100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 29, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, JUNE 29, 1954 '

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, JUNE 29, 1954' THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THRFI~

ROBERTS TOP IN CONTROL PITCHING:
AUla, Snider Lead Major L

eague. Batting Race

In

W imbledon

WIMBLEDON, England (R -
Jaroslav Drobny and Budge Patty,
old-time tennis travelers, made
Wimbledon's seeded list look up-
side down Monday with quarter-
final upsets of Lew Hoa.. and Vic
Seixas.
The efforts of these two, seeded
11th and 7th, respectively, in what
amounts to the world champions
of amateur tennis, greatly en-
hanced Tony Trabert's chances of
adding the Wimbledon title to his
American championship.
Trabert, the top-seeded player,
breezed past the first Australian
obstacle in his paths, Mervyn Rose,
6-2, 6-2, 7-5 to lead the way into
the semi final round. Only one
other Australian was left to oppose
him as 19-year-old Ken Rosewall
eliminated his countryman, Rex
Hartwig, 6-3, 3-6, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1.
Beaten Soundly
The day's big news, however,
was that Hoad, the second-seeded
player, and Seixas, the defending
~ champion who was rated fourth,
had the daylights whaled out of
them by a couple of players who
r aren't supposed to provide much
opposition.
Drobny, a Czech-born Egyptian
who makes his home in England,
trounced Hoad, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3, when
he had been expected to lose in
straight sets.
Defending champion Seixas, a
good looking Philadelphian, lost to
Patty, 7-5, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2. Patty, 1950
Wimbledon champion, is a native
American. But in recent years he
has spent most of his time in Paris
or playing tennis all over the
world.
MEajor League
Stndings
ry AMERICAN LEAGUE

All in all, it was one of the
most surprising men's quarter
finals Wimbledon has had since
World War IL While all this was
going on, the girls were playing
their round of 16 according to
form. Here's how it went:
Little "Mo" Wins
No. 1 seeded Maureen Connolly
of San Diego, Calif., took two love
sets from Britain's Angela Buxton.
No. 2, Doris Hart of Coral Gables,
Fla., defeated Nicla Migliori, Italy,

71'urne
6-1, 6-1; Shirley Fry, Akron, Ohio,
beat Pat Ward, Britain, 6-3, 6-1;
Louise Brough, Beverly Hills,
Calif.,Nbeat Barbara Bradley,
Reno, Nev., 6-1, 6-1, and Mrs. Mar-
garet DuPont, Wilmington, Del.,
defeated Christiane Mer celis, Bel-
gium, 6-1, 8-6. They're 3, 4 and
5 in the seedings.
Mrs. Betty Pratt, of South
Orange, N.J., No. 8, became the
sixth American semi finalist with
a 6-4, 3-6, -3 victory over Britain's
Joan Curry.

NEW YORK (A'1 - Just a decade
ago the major league batting
champions were a Cleveland In-
dians' infielder and an outfielder
for the Brooklyn Dodgers. It looks
now as though history may be
repeated in 1954.
In 1944 Cleveland shortstop, Lou
Boudreau, now the manager of the
Boston Red Sox, won the American
League batting title with a .327
average and Brooklyn outfielder
Dixie Walker was the National
League leader at .357.
Ten years later, as the season
approaches the halfway point, sec-
ond baseman Bobby Avila of the
Indians tops the American League
batting parade with a .371 mark
and outfielder Duke Snider of the
Dodgers is setting the pace among
National League batsmen at .368.
Figures include games of Sunday.
Rosen Second
Avila holds a comfortable 31-
point edge over runnerup Al Rosen,;
also of Cleveland.
Rosen leads the league in home
runs with 14.
Nellie Fox of the Chicago White
Sox, in third place with .331, con-

tinues to rise and now has chal-
lenged Rosen for runnerup honors.
Don Mueller of the New York
Giants is second to Snider in the
National League scramble at .365.
The 27-year-old Brooklyn flychaser
slipped seven points in going 7-
for - 22. Mueller, meanwhile, in
advancing from third place, gained
one point as he went 10-for-27.
Stan Musia) or te Cards re-
mains ahead in the runs batted
in department with 72, but he has
relinquished the home run derby
lead to Willie Mays of the Giants.
Mays has 24, while Musial is dead-
locked with Hank Sauer of the
Cubs with 23 apiece.
NEW YORK - Robin Roberts
of the Philadelphia Phillies and Ed
Lopat of the New York Yankees,
trol pitchers, again are making
the batters work to get on base
this season.
Roberts has issued only 18 bases
on balls in 149 innings for a per
game average of 1.09, the lowest
in the majors.
One of the great control artists
of modern times, tl: 27-year-old
righthander s lifetim performanc

is exemplary. In 248 games, cov-
ering 1,819 innings, Robin has
given up 401 walks for a 1.98 per-
centage per nine - inning game.
Over-all, he has a 124-80 won-lost
recordand is 10-7 this year.
Lopat, 36, and ir, his 11th major
league year, has the bst control
mark in the American League this
season, having allowed 15 bases on
balls in 91 frames for a 1.48 av-
erage. He has won seven games
and dropped three.!
Paul Minner of the Chicago Cubs
is runnerup to Roberts this season
with a 2.20 mark. The tall left-
hander has permitted 24 bases on
balls in 98 innings. He is 5-5 on
the won-lost list.

Murry Dickson of the Phillies
with 2.47, Bob Miller, also of Phil-
adelphia, 2.51, Fred Baczewski,
Cincinnati, 2.62 and Russ Meyer,
brooklyn, 2.70 are other National
League pitchers with excellent con-
trol slates.
Gromek Second
Detroit's Steve Gromek, making
a fine comeback with nine vic-
tories against six defats, is sec-
ond to Lopat in the American
League. He has given up only 21
walks in 115 innings for a 164 per
game average.

- .7

_i

New pumps are being installed
on the Colorado River Aqueduct
in California to increase its capac-
ity 70 per cent.
Los Angeles' 32-story city hall
employs 109 janitors.
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
B Cat
I BARGAIN PRICES

4

II

Bolt Wins Insurance City
Golf Open on Last Green

11

COLLEGIATE-CUTS
A SPECIALTY!!
WELCOME STUDENTS
Q 9 Haircutters
r No Waiting
* Air Conditioned
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theater

I

AQUALU NGS
SWIM FINS and MASKS
UNDERWATER CAMERAS and CASES
WHITE'S
SKINDIVER SUPPLY COMPANY
Telephone HA 6-8169 anytime 7970 "G" Street
Dexter, Mich.
Hours: 8:00 to 5:00-Nights and Week-ends by appointment

WETHERSFIELD, Conn. iA-
Tommy Bolt, fighting desperately
to protect a one-stroke lead, won
the Insurance City Open Golf Tour-
nament 18-hole playoff Monday
when Earl Stewart conceded on
the final green in a heavy shower.
The anti-climactic ending disap-
pointed a crowd of some 2,500 who
had seen Bolt wallop out a three-
stroke lead .with birdies on three
opening holes, only to have Stew-
art slice it to one stroke as the
ace performers reached the 18th
tee.
The 32-year-old Stewart, who
had birdied the 16th, had the honor
for the tee shot on the decisive
final and proceeded to sock it out
of bounds by about 18 inches. He
had to play another drive, which
counted as his third stroke, and
his next shot landed off the green
to the left of the trap.
First Big Victory of Year
Meantime Bolt, scoring his first
major PGA tourney victory since
winning the Miami Beach four-ball
with Dick Mayer last March, was
on the green in two, within easy
range of a par 4. Stewart pitched
to the pin on his fifth shot, and
quickly picked it up.
That was it.
For the colorful Bolt, a trans-
planted Texan from Halworth,
Okla., the action was worth top
money of $2,400., Stewart, also a
Texan, collected $1,800. They had
finished the 72-hole tourney Sun-
day in a tie with 271 each.
Just before the battle ended, Bolt
had walked off the final tee in
63 strokes, one less than Stewart,
who probably is playing the PGA

circuit -for the last time-he wants
to settle down with his family.
In an interview later, Stewart
explained that he picked up "sincej
there no longer was any doubt'
about the outcome."
Power Beaned
PHILADELPHIA W)-Vic Pow-
er of the Philadelphia Athletics
was struck on the head by a pitch-
ed ball Monday night and carried
from the field in the first inning
of an exhibition baseball game
with the Philadelphia Phillies at
Connie Mack Stadium.
Power came to bat against Phil-
lies bonus hurler Tommy Qual-
ters with a man on first and one
out. The first pitch struck him on
the head.
Power was taken to Presbyterian
Hospital and after examination
by doctors was admitted for fur-
ther observation. The physicians
said he was conscious and in good
condition.
Power came to the A's last Dec.
16 in the 13-man trade with the
New York Yankees.
MICHIGAN'S
ULTRA MODERN
SHOP
AI R CONDITIONED
6 BARBERS
Special Attention Given
Ladies' & Children's Hair Cutting
U of M BARBERS
715 N. University
T.V. For Your Enjoyment

111t

JIIL

i i r rrwi

.
l
;
4
i
I
}
i
I
I
1

1

W
Cleveland ...46
Chicago ....45
New York ...44
Detroit.....29
Washington 29
Baltimore ...27
Philadelphia 26
Boston ......24
NATIONAL
W
New York ..45
Broklyn ....44
Philadelphia 35
Milwaukee ..33
Cincinnati,. .33
St. Louis ....32
!Chicago .....23
Pittsburgh ..23
sBB
PROBABLE;

L
22
24
26
36
38
42
41
41

Pct.
.676
.652
.629
.446
.433
.391
.388
.369

GB
1'
3
151,
161/2
191/
191/
201/

A

Very

Limited

Number

LEAGUE
L Pct. GB
23 .662 ,..
24 .647 12/
30 .538 8%
33 .500 11
35 .485 12
35 .478 121%
42 .354 201
46 .333 22s

will

D54

EIISiflS

in

be

on

sQie

at

the

Student

PublicatioflS

Bldg.

I

Only

$700

j

Bo

1I

i

SA

E

i a

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan