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June 23, 1954 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-06-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28,1054

?AG? TO17R~ TIlE MICHIGAN IJAILY WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23. 1954

Bank School
Attracts Top
Financiers
Nurses Discuss
Care of Aging
People from several walks of
life have invaded the University
campus this week to take advan-
tage of various conferences being
offered.
The b u si n e s s administration
school, in cooperation with the
Michigan Bankers Association; be-
gan a School of Banking Sunday
which will last until July 17. The
first part of the course, which
is based on a study of banking,
general principles of economics
and business practice, will be open
to first-year students. Bankers who
have already worked off their
freshman training will attend the
conference from July 15 to 17.
The school's curriculum includes
the major areas of finance, ac-
counting and business law, in ad-
dition to supplementary lectures
and seminars in such fields as real
estate appraisal.
Public Utility
In conjunction with this confer-
ence, the business administration
school also started a program for
public utility executives Sunday,
lasting until July 16.
The four-week course is intend-
ed to provide an expanded point
of view and an interest in broader
problems of business for execu-
tives from all across the country,
and is aimed at helping persons
in upper management levels be-
come better equipped to undertake
top management problems.
Care for the Aged
In- keeping with the national in-
terest in the growing number of
people over 65 years old, the pub-
lic health school started a special
course in "Nursing Care for the
Aged" yesterday lasting through
Friday.
Discussions will center around
the physiological changes in the
aging, emotional needs of older
persons and their recreational
needs.
Linguistics Talk
The first in a series of summer
lectures sponsored by the Linguis-
tic Institute will be held at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow in the Rackham
amphitheatre.
Prof. Bernard Bloch of Yale
University and editor of Language
will give a lecture on "Linguistics
as a Science."
FOUNTAIN
PENS
Authorized Fountain Pen
Safes and Service
for
PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS
SHEAFFER FOUNTAIN PENS
Watch our advertising for the new
Parker ball point Pen.
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone NO8-7177

Summer School Brings 'U' Back to Life

Art Displays
Show Work'
Of Painters
Three women painters, Irene
Rice Pereira, Kay Sage and Doro-
thea Tanning, will be featured
this month in an exhibit at the
University Museum of Art, Alum-
ni Memorial Hall.
The exhibit, which opened Sun-
day and will run through July'
25, is part of the summer session
program, "Woman in the World
of Man."
Light is the element that gives
human meaning to the four-di-
mensional world, according to
Miss Pereira. As a non-objective
painter, her pictures deal with
geometric design in which light
plays a dominant part.
Miss Pereira will visit the cam-
pus late in the summer to give a
program lecture enttiled, "Wo-
men and Dimensions in Art," and
to participate in a panel discus-
sion of "The Artist's Values and
Perspectives."
The other artists, both associ-
ated with the surrealist move-
ment, deal with subject matter in
special symbolic ways.
Shown concurrently with this
exhibit will be a display of draw-
ings, water colors and prints from
the University's own collections.
One is -concerned with "Woman
as Subject" and the other with
"Woman as Artist."
Museum hours are 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. weekdays and 2 to 5 p.m.
Sundays.

Panel Discussion Slated
For Scientists, Journalists

In cooperation with the Inter-
national Nuclear Engineering
Congress, the journalism depart-
ment will hold a panel discussion
on the subject "I Don't Want To
Be Quoted by the Press."
The panel will discuss the prob-
lems facing journalists and scien-
tists in preparing releases on
scientific subjects for mass com-
munication. Moderator for the
panel will be Prof. Wesley H.
Maurer, chairman of the journal-
ism department.
Students are invited to attend
the discussion at 8 p.m. tomorrow
in Rackham Lecture Hall. No ad-
mission will be charged.
Members of the panel are Paul

Block, Jr., publisher of the To-
lego Blade and co-publisher of the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; Allen V.
Astin, director of the U. S. Bur-
eau of Standards; Watson Davis,
director of Science Service and
Jerome Luntz, editor, nucleonics.
Others are Duane Roller, edi-
tor, scientist and connected with
the Scientific Monthly, and John
J. Grebe, in nuclear research and
development of the Dow Chemi-
cal Company.
Scientists estimate that the
maximum age to which a human
being can live is between 112 and
115 years.

-Daily-Marj Crozier
SOME SEEK SUN
MEET YOUR PRESIDENT:
Hatchers Invite Students,
Faculty to OpenHouse

-Dalny-Mara urozier
OTHERS CONTEMPLATE ACADEMICS
Guatemalan War Battle
Of AiWaeCensors

HENRY H.
S'TEVENS, Inc.
DISTANCE
MOVING-
173 roadway Rift
,Flint, Michigan Lit. 4
Phone Flint Menageg
Collect 4-1686
Intertat.Rates.
We own, operate and schedule our own fleet of vens
for direct service without transfer,

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'1

President and Mrs. Harlan H.v
Hatcher will again hold open
houses at their home at 815 S. Uni-
versity, tomorrow and Friday eve-
ning from 8 to 10 p.m.
All summer sesion students are
invited to attend an informal re-
ception tomorrow, with the Wo-
men's League Council as hostess-
es. Dawn Waldron, '56Mu, will
sing several selections to provide
entertainment for students get-
ting acquainted with the Hatch-
ers.
Hostesses Named
Pouring at the tea will be Miss
Gertrude Mullhollan, Dean De-
borah Bacon, Associate Dean Sar-
ah L. Healy,rAssistant Dean Elsie
R. Fuller, Mrs. Edith M. Wheeler,
Mrs. Charles Davis, Mrs. Harold
M. Dorr and Prof. Ella McNeil.
Others serving refreshments
Sales Start
.For Russell
Tickets are now on sale for the
appearance of the international
concert comedienne, Anna Russell.
Miss Russell will come here July
19 in conjunction with the special
summer program, "Woman in the
World of Man."
Among the sketches Miss Rus-
sell will perform are "Local Cele-
brities Attending the Art Show"
and "How to Get Along in a
Crowded 'Street Car."
Miss Russell has appeared on
television and as soloist with sym-
phony orchestras in Rochester,
Cincinnati, Toronto and New Or-
leans.
Tickets, which may be obtained
through mail orders, are priced
at $1.50, $1.00 and 50 cents.

will be Dr. Mabel Rugen, Dr. Mar-
garet Ble ,lMrs. Edd Miller and
Mrs. Kathleen Mead.
Faculty Invited
On Friday evening Prof. and
Mrs. Harold M. Dorr will assist
President and Mrs. Hatcher in
the receiving line for an informal
reception for members of the sum-
mer faculty, honoring the visiting
faculty at the University.
Hostesses for the faculty tea
will include Mrs. Wilbur K. Pier-
pont, Mrs. Marvin L. Niehuss, Mrs.
Erich Walter, Mrs. Robert L. Wil-
liams, Mrs. Arthur Brummage and
Mrs. Edd Miller.
Mrs. Stanley Fontanna, Mrs.
Burtin D. Thuma, Mrs. G. G.
Brown, Mrs.THarlan Koch, Mrs.
A. C. Fertenberg, Miss Rhode Red-
dgi, Mrs. Henry F. Vaughan, Mrs.
Blythe E. Stason, Mrs. Willard
Olson, Mrs. Frederick H. Wag-
man, Mrs. Walter V. Marshall and
Mrs. Peggert will pour.
The Hatchers have numerous
teas throughout the year for stu-
dents and faculty, and last year
held a series of departmental op-
en houses for student and faculty
members of all the various de-
partments on campus.
Coeds and men are urged to at-
tend the Hatcher tea on Thurs-
day to get acquainted with the
President and other summer ses-
sion students,
CUSTOM
HAIRSTYLING
for Ladies
No Appointments Needed
6 Stylists
Air Conditioned
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theater

WASHINGTON UR) - One of the
world's strangest wars is being
bought in Guatamela.
Five days after it started, nei-
ther side has reported a single
one of its soldiers killed in action
on any battlefront.
Up to now, the bloodiest battles
apparently have been those de-
scribed on the radio. Both the gov-
ernment and the anti-Communist
invader forces have been busy on
the airwaves.
There have been reports, second-
hand through British Honduras,
that the Guatemalan army chiefs
are claiming to have inflicted
heavy casualties. These reports
didn't mention that their side was
suffering casualties itself.
Perhaps the world will have to
wait first-hand reports to get the
true story of what is going on
Private Schine
Back at Gordon
AUGUSTA, Ga. (R-Pvt. G. Da-
vid Schine, controversial figure in
the McCarthy-Army hearings, is
back at Camp Gordon.
Schine was assigned to a new
detachment where he will be with
a military police Reserve Officers
Training Corps summer encamp-
ment unit.

down in the little Central Ameri-
can republic.
Censorship, the upheaval caused
by an emergency, and a govern-
ment never famed for its efficien-
cy have not permitted a clear sto-
ry of events to get out of Guate-
mala.
Several elements usually neces-
sary for success have not appeared
in the reports reaching the out-
side world.
Regardless of the source and the
extent of financial backing, and of
the amount and quality of war
weapons, the reports indicate the
attackers are ill-equipped to fight
a war.
Another element usually neces-
sary in the overthrow of a govern-
ment in power is a widespread
uprising of popular support inside
Guatemala itself. Normally, such
help means overwhelming support
from the civilian population and,
more important the cooperation of
the army.
The radio announcements of the
"liberation" forces have claimed
somehdefections, but apparently
they have not been numerous.
The farther from Guatemala, the
worse the war appears. Not even
the government of Guatemala, nor
the regime of President Jacobo Ar-
benz Guzman, have issued such
baleful accounts of things.

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11

WELCOME TO SUMMER SCHOOL
FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY
302 South State Street
THE HOME OF FAMOUS BRANDS

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Ann Fogarty dresses a
Dalton cashmere sweaters
Canterbury nylon sweaters
Evan Picone skirts

Arthur Jay suits
Haymaker skirts
Beaumart golfers
Kernberly knitwear

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Founded 1915 Phone NO 8-7831 State and Williams Sts.

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and others too numerous to mention
WE INVITE YOUR CHARGE ACCOUNT

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