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July 22, 1954 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-07-22

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FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY M. 1954

pnhIlt THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. JULY 22, 1954

CAN NEGRO AND WHITE LIVE TOGETHER?
Africa's Major Prbe:Racial Co-Existence

Nunn Gets
Cataloging
(_ rnl v lnt

Role of Speech Education
In General Curriculum Told

I

JOHANNESBURG (A)-Can the
white man work and live with the
colored to develop the vast riches
of Afria and lead its people along
the lines of free Western civiliza-
tion?
This vital question is an imme-
diate, burning issue to 5,000,000
whites now living among nearly
200,000,000 Africans-mostly pri-
mitive blacks-on a continent
nearly, four times the size of the
United States.
Great world social forces are
steadily pushing the African issue
to the forefront in London, Paris,
Lisbon, Brussels and Madrid-the
centers of African colonial rule.
Ninety per cent of Africa's sur-
face and 75 per cent of its people
are ruled today fr6m these Euro-
pean cities. This illustrates the
continent's importance in a day
when "imperialism" and "colon-
ialismh" are fighting words. It
should be noted however that in:
some cases there are varying de-
grees of self-government.
There are rumblings in widely
scattered parts of the dark conti-
nent--from the area north of the
Sahara inhabited chiefly by Arabs
down to the Cape, where South
African Prime Minister Daniel Ma-
Ian is trying to restrict the voting
rights of more than a million half
castes.
French Decline
Decline of French prestige be-
cause of the Indochina debacle
may soon bring new disorders in
North Africa. There is pressuresfor
speedy solution of Egyptian de-
mands that 80,000,Britishtroops
pull out of the.Suez canal zone.
Nationalism, demands for irde-
pendence,. cries for equal treat-
ment are part of the brew in this
African ferment. In some areas
like theGold Coast and Nigeria
(whose 30,000,000 people consti-
tute nearly half the population of
the British colonial territories),
full self-government may be only
a year or more away.
Britainn and Egypt, which to-
gether rulebthe million-square mile
Sudan on the upper Nile, last year
guaranteed self-determination to
the Sudanese. BrLitish administra-
tors are being withdrawn gradu-
ally.;
The pot is boiling over in other
places,
Mau 'Mau "land freedom arm-
ies" have been fighting for more
than 20 months in Kenya in an
arnti-white rebellion. Shortage of
land for the native blacks is one
reason.7 -Next door in neighboiing
Ugada, known as "the pearl of
Africa," black political leaders de-
manrnd an African government by
Washington and Moscow, rival
centers in. today's battle of ideas,
are watching closely, lending a
hand- now and then.
American Influence
American capital is helping to
mine uranium riches of the Congo
and South Africa and to produce
rubber and iron ore in Liberia, the
little African republic founded in
1822 by freed American slaves.

:::" ::::::::::::::::::Is firm, paternal rule of backward blacks, ; ,
plus advancement for the civilized, the;
.......................... solution for Africa's race problem?
:,"rEgypt demands
French brace for - 1 -British pull
reaction after A[GERIA out of Suez.
*i nohia ./ LIBYA :EGYPT'r
\ndochinc
Val .. I :::ill Sudan, nearing
i ndependence, favor
.-I r i Egypt or Britain?
I.
FRENCH WEST AFRICA.
, tT" R A THE SUDAN
t.. UTRAL ~ i*. -'~~t .*
-NIGERIA "" QUATORIAL"a
Ia t AFCA:ETHIOI
. BERIAA CAM[ROONS :
1' ~ KEMYA
Will oldest African #G
republic promote Mau Mu st ill
"AfricaforAfricons'? .C Gon morch.
. .......................}- .. .it go beyond
Independence expected.in , year .:Kenya?
or two. Con handful of educated "
,::::blacks provide needed leadership? :~QL
Black members of parlioment
in Britain'"s new centrol state::::.r
......... .. ......1
............ seek removal of color bar, SG TI ET ....-.
MAP POiiiNTSiUTREiiNL UNIEN OF AFRICAR
MAP PONTS OU REGINAL PR LEMS O UTAFRIAFRC

Arab kingdom. Mostly sandy des- ! (1, AA3 N.t (fib
ert, Libya is not self-supporting
and the British help subsidize it G. Raymond Nunn, associate
in return for military advantages, catalog librarian in the General
Liberia, where one must have! Library of the University, has ac-
Negro blood to vote, depends to a icepted an appointment as chair-

large part on the Firestone Rub-
ber plantations, iron deposits now
producing 1,750,000 tons of ore
yearly, and on American technical
assistance. Foreign shippers, at-
tracted by low taxes, registered
one sixth of the world's new ship-
ping in 1953 under the Liberian
flag.
The Union of South Africa sup-
plies nearly half the world's gold
and claims to have the world's
biggest uranium resources. It is the
center of world diamond produc-
tion. With all this it has its prob-
lems too: chiefly apartheid and
the struggle to segregate white
skins from colored. The Union
hints every now and then it will
leave the commonwealth.
Nearing Independence
The areas nearing independence
are the Gold Coast, Nigeria and
the Sudan. Last month the British
suggested British Togoland be in-
tegrated with the Gold Coast,
which is rich not in gold but co-
coa. Nkrumah, first Negro to be-
come prime minister of a British
colony, is American educated (at
Lincoln University in Pennsylvan-
ia and the University of Pennsyl-
vania). He led his people toward
freedom, using non-violent means
such as a general strike. The Gold
Coastedepends on cocoa for reve-
nue but has great bauxite re-
serves which require electric pow-
er and thus foreign investment.
A new constitution goes into ef-
fect in Nigeria soon under which
the British will grant self-govern-
ment to any region that wants it
in 1956.
Elsewhere, African demands for
a political voice are dealt, with dif-
ferently. In British Ras-,, Africa,
including Tanganyika-still two-
t.'irds uninhabitable because of
the tsetse fly-some negroes have
been appointed to legis~atille coun-
cils. White authorities in Tangan-
yika, Kenya and Uganda do not
want to see them elected.

man of the Special Committee on
Cataloging Oriental Materials of
the Division of Cataloging and
Classification of the American Li-
brary Association.
This committee was set up to
review and amend library catalog-
ing codes for publications in Far
Eastern and South Asian lang-
uages, collections of which have
grown rapidly in U.S. research
libraries since the war.
A native of Enr'land and well on
his way to becoming a U.S. citizen,
Nunn is a graduate of the London
University School of Librarianship
and the London School of Orient-
al iio African Studies. He was
granted a Master of Arts degrec
i Far Eastern languages by the
University of Michigan this year
and has passed frs preeiminary
examinations for a Doctor of Phil-
oso:hy degree.
During the last three years, he
ha,- been connc teJ with the de-
velopment of the Far Eastern col-
lectiGns in the General Library in
::c'oiation with members of the
Jata-es Center and the Depar.-
ment 2af Far Eas;,,rn Languages.
Documentary
To Be Shown
"Passion for Life," a documen-
tary film of feature length, will
be shown at 4:15 p.m. and 8 p.m.
today in Aud. B. of Haven Hall.
The film presents a picture of
village life inrasFrench mountain
community in Provence. It con-
cerns the story of a young ex-
soldier who goes to a village to ex-
pound democratic principles.
The film is in French with Eng-
lish sub-titles.
Admission to the event is free:
The movie is the climax of the
summer film festival sponsored by
I the education school.

h Paul W. Briggs, Superintendent
of Bay City Public Schools, spoke
yesterday under the auspices of
the speech department on the sub-
ject, "A School Administrator
Looks at Speech Education."
Briggs said that to understand
the role of speech education in the
public school it is necessary to see
how speech fits into the general
curriculum. Speech is of great im-
portance to education, he contin-
ued, since a nation to be strong,
must be vocal.
The superintendent believes that
there are three main responsibili-
ties in teaching speech. The first
is remedial work with the handi-
capped child, teaching him to
communicate with the world. The
second responsibility is to the av-
erage child. The third and major
area of importance is to the child
orio
I N W
Littlec
wing
Sizes
0
SD R ESSE
SUITS
Sizes
The tir
Pull-on
Earring
ON FOREST
JUST OFF SOUTH UNIVEI

who excels in speech. This child
should be given additional oppor-
tunity to develop, he said.
There is a new trend in speech
education, toward its introduc-
tion in classes from kindergarten
through high school. Briggs feels
that the child should be taken
through a series of planned speech
experiences.
Briggs named a few of the prob-
lems facing the teachers of speech
today. He said that there was a
lack of general understanding of
the potential of speech education.
There is also a lack of vision in
interpreting this potential to
school administrators.
Certain basic experiences for
children are obligations of a dem-
ocracy. Of these experiences, the
ability to express oneself ably
ranks at the top in importance.

A
'I

SMART-

s

PACKABL E-
FTUBBABLE-
dress up or down our
2-piece beauties.
HITE AND PASTELS
collars - jewel necks -
sleeves.
s 10-18 at 14.95 to 39.95
ther wool knits, too.
ES .......... from 25.00
.. .49.95.
121/2 to 221/2 - 10-40
ny ribbon hot.....3.95
cotton gloves......3.95
gs and bracelet. . :1.00 ea.

American experts supply technical
aid in some areas. There are im-
portant U.S. strategic air bases in
Morocco and an American airfield
in Libya. An American military
mission was assigned to Liberia in
1951 and a similar mission was
sent recently to help train Haile
Selassie's forces in Ethiopia.
The Communists, striving for a
foothold, provide money and men,
too-to finance political agitation,
foster unrest and build common
fronts with awakening African
nationalist movements. In Asia,
the communist cry is "out with
foreign imperialists." Here it is
"Africa for the Africans." They
don't add their intention is to in-
stall a Communist brand of im-
perialism.
Another world capital watches
too. New Delhi, center of an In-
dian nation bursting with excess
population, hopefully eyes the
vast reaches of Africa across the
Indian ocean. Hundreds of thous-
ands of Indians today crowd the
seaports and inland cities of East
Africa, down as far as Durban in
South Africa.
The South African government,
suspicious and fearful of its grow-

ing Indian population, last month of South Africa. All have their
asked India to close down the of- separate problems:
fice of the Indian high commis- Egypt has an army junta striv-$
sioner to the Union. This consti- ing for economic stability and at-
tuted a break in diplomatic rela- tempting to provide a better life
tions between members of the Bri- for millions of fellaheen. Crooked
tish commonwealth. politicians are itching to regain
Hemingway Revisited 'control and communists are stir-
Africa has changed tremendous- ring up trouble among the masses.
fivtlikr thA rAt fNrth Afric

,yl
m

ly in the last 50-in the last 10
years. Air travel more than any1
other fact is responsible. There are
.airfields, not more than several
hundred miles apart, all over the
continent.
Symbolic perhaps is the infor-
mation that the ice cap on mount
Kilimanjaro is fast melting away.
Lions, leopards, elephants and
giraffes are being pushed back
steadily into narrow game pre-
serves. You can still "bring them
back alive" but it's a much tamer
and more luxurious sport nowa-
ways. But one can still see digni-
fied blacks with pierced, dangling
ear lobes, or wearing massive cop-
per wire anklets, even on the
streets of Johannesburg, a modern
skyscraper city that gold built.
The black population of Africa
is on the increase and whites fore-
see a future when they will be
even more outnumbered.
For the most part the blacks are
without education. There is only
a handful of capable leaders, like
Prime Minister Kwame Nkrumah
of the Gold Coast. That's why
white leadership is necessary now.
Separate Problems
The five independent countries
in Africa today are Egypt, Ethi-
opia, Libya, Liberia and the Union

Egypt ie e rest o2worm Arca
is chiefly Arab, as opposed to Ne-
gro.
Ethiopia is self-supporting, with
coffee, gold and new, unproved
uranium wealth. The country is
primitive and feudal and lacks
educational facilities. Although a
black-run empire for centuries,
Ethiopia still needs scores of for-
eign advisers. The United Nations
recently gave neighboring Eritrea,
Italian pre-war colony, to Ethio-
pia as a federated state. Eritrea isj
broke.
Libya was also Italian. The Unit-
ed Nations set this up as a new

i
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RSITY

t
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11

OM E T P I T14 G

CONTINUATION
of our
PRE-INVENTORY SALE
Lady Hathaway Shirts
(selected group)
20% off
Sizes 10to 18

FROA

THE

7 r

k!

Student SupplieS
TYPEWRITERS
REPAIRED
"..,,,RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT

17

All
Soles
Finili

SUMMER STORE HOURS:
Monday thru Friday 9:00 to 5:30
Saturday 9:00 to 1:00

No
Lay-
Aways

I

Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago
Tape Recorders
MORRILL'S
314 S. State Ph. NO 8-7177

1

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a H
+T ' D , , r a X r
inky} 7. t+ M J 4f{ wt
it.
i M R d ? 3 ° + .*fl"'J .X a 3 "4 * 4te F :y a Y{".
v f a fl i+4:' '{. ? icy, f
X Ai
{
f .y t 1
"w :} }: " '" ' of r

81

CONTINUATION
of our
PRE-INVENTORY SALE.
20% to 50% off
(selected groups)
Sport Shirts, Bermuda Shorts,
Neckwear, Straw and Felt Hats,
Cotton Hose, Dress Shirts, etc.

4.
:}
}
lo

Who ever said this is a
man's world? Not while
we girls can take over
the boys' entire shirt col-
lection for our very own!
Here, all in cotton
broadcloth ... Far Left:
Shapely Classic's calico
print with plunge
neckline. Turquoise, ton,
red or green. Sizes
10to 18. 4.95.
Center Left: Haymaker's
wide-stripe shirt in
gold, rose, brown or
black. Sizes 10
to 16. 6.50.
Center Right: Provincial
print shirt by Shapely
Classic in turquoise,
gold, green or red.
Sizes 10to 18. 4.95.
Far Right: Haymaker's
multistripe shirt in brown
olive or charcoal,
Sizes 10 to 16. 6.50.

,
,:.

PURCHASE

r:I

CAMERA SHOP

sponsors
FREE GRIAFLEX
Camera Clinicand
Demonstration
Visit our store any time be-
tween 9 A.M. and 6 P.M. on
Friday, July 23rd. Bring your
camera and your photographic
problems.
Mr. Barron Stilson,
Photographic Technician
GRAFLEX, Inc.
- . will be at our store to dem-

5'.

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r

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I

fill

11

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1111

11

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