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June 22, 1954 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-06-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"wft-lE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 SDAY, JUNE 22, ]954

TEIE MICHIGAN I)A.L .TU.SDAY,.JUNE U,,1..

Regents Accept $240,800 in Grants

HEARINGS REVIEW:

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(Continued from Page 1)
Ernest N. May, Wilmington, Del-
aware, has given $500 for the Isola
Denman Robinson scholarship fund.
The Regents accepted the offer
of Harold M. Sapero and Samuel
Shapero, 2515 Cadillac Tower, De-
troit, that $500 will be provided by
the Samuel and Harold M. Shapero
Foundatio to establish an annual
scholarship of that amount in the
Law School. The dean of the Law
School will designate the recipient
or recipients from students enter-
ing the freshman, junior or senior
law classes who demonstrate sup-
erior scholarship by the grades re-
ce' =d are serious scholars and
are in real financial need.
Parke, Davis and Company, De-
troit, has given $450 for the com-
pany's fellowship in pharmaceuti-
cal chemistry.'
From the University Club of De-
troit, the Regents accepted $258.94
for the club's endowment fund and
$228.79. for the Union Opera As-
sistance fund.
The Erie and Kalamazoo Rail-
road Company, Pontiac, has given
$200 "for the preparation of a his-
tory of the railroad by a student
of t3 Univer-"y under the direc-
tion of Prof. Lewis G. Vander
Wilde," director of the Michigan
Historical Collections.
Cooley Foundation
From F. Charlton Mills, Jr., 965
Wayside Road, Cleveland, the Re-
gents accepted $200 for the Morti-
mer E. Cooley Foundation r" En-
gineering fund.
Dr. Carl J. Her'-elmann, Lin-
coln, Nebraska, has given $200 to
assist in the expenses of the Uni-
versity's Aleutian expedition this
summer. The fund will be admin-
istered by Theodore P. Bank, II,
field director of the expedition,
and is to be used for dental sur-
veys and research.
Several members of the Medical
School have donated services which
have been credited to departmen-
tal funds as they have designated:
$150 has been, credited to the Oph-
thalmological Research fund with
Dr. Harold F. Falls contributing
$25, Dr. F. Bruce Fralick, $100,
and Dr. John W. Henderson, $25;

the Pathology Department Travel
Fund-Expendable Account has been
credited ,vith $50 for services do-
nated by Dr. Carl V. Weller; and
the Department of Internal Medi-
cine, Contingent Fund, has been
credited with $156.25 for services
donated by Dr. Cyrus C. Sturgis.
The Detroit Alumni Chapter of
Alpha Omega fraternity, Detroit,
has given $100 for the chapter's
loan fund.
Leaves of Absence
Ten leaves of absence were also
approved by the Regents for the
1954-55 term.
Prof. Paul Henle of the philoso-
phy department was granted a sab-
batical to go to the University of
Paris under a Fulbright research
fellowship.
Prof. Cyrus Levinthal of the phy-
sics department was given leave for
the year to accept a fellowship
from the National Foundation of
Infantile Paralysis to work in the
Pasteur Institute in Paris on virus
research.
The U. S. Public Health Service
has awarded Prof. Robert Mc-
Cleary of the psychology depart-
ment a special research fellowship
for research on the neural mech-
anisms involved in the learning
process.
Prof. Haller Jones of the College
of Architecture and Design will
study art education programs in
the New York area.
A Fulbright grant will enable
Prof. Wiley Hitchcock of the
School of Music to do research in
Italy.
Other leaves were granted for
part time periods.
Prof. H. R. Crane of the physics
department will supervise a Naval
Ordinance Research project. Prof.
Robert Thrall of the mathematics
department will conduct opera-
tions research for the U. S. Army
and Prof. Charles Dolph of the
mathematics department will serve
as a research mathematician.
. Prof. Richard Blackwell of the
medical school will direct the Vi-
sion and Optics Division of Project
Michigan.

The National Science Founda-
tion has awarded a grant to Prof.
Leonard Tornheim of the mathe-
matics department for research on
the geometry of numbers.
Botany Expedition
A leave for the fall semester was
given to Prof. Pierre Dansereau of
the botany department. He will
take part in a botanical expedition
to the Ivory Coast.
Henry Smith Carhart Professor
of physics, George Uhlenbeck will
be -a visiting professor of theoreti-
cal physics at the University of
Leiden.
A leave for the second semester
was granted to Prof. John Carow
of tlhe forestry school.
Prof. Preston Slosson of the his-
tory department will be the Haynes
Foundation Visiting Professor at
the University of Redlands.
The appointment of two visiting
professors was also made at the
Regents meeting.
Prof. Daniel Wit of the Univer-
sity of Cincinnati will join the po-
litical science department for the
1954-55 term.
Prof. Howard Wilensky of the
University of Chicago was appoint-
ed assistant professor of sociology.
Emeritus Titles
Emeritus titles weie conferred
on five members of the University
faculty. They are:
Jose Maria Albaladejo, assistant
professor emeritus of Spanish; Al-
fred Lynn Ferguson, professor em-
eritus of chemistry; Arthur Hack-
ett, professor emeritus of voice; Al-
bert Easton White, professor emer-
itus of metallurgical engineering
and director emeritus of the Engi-
neering Research Institute, and
Alvalyn Eunice Woodward, assist-E
ant professor emeritus of zoology.I

No Final Action Taken
On Faculty Suspensions

(Continued from Page 1)

do not feel that the invocation of
a right guaranteed every citizen by
the Constitution is grounds for
firing," the statement added.
As soon as the suspensions were
announced the carefully planned
machinery of the procedures set
up to handle such cases began to
move.
The procedures were established
in May, 1953 by a joint faculty-
administrative group. The proce-
dures were then approved by the
Faculty Senate, a body composed
of all University faculty members
with the rank of assistant pro-
fessor and up.
Special Sub-Committee
Under the new procedures the
Senate Advisory Committee, the
executive body of the Faculty
Senate, appointed a special Sub-
committee on Intellectual Freedom
and Integrity.
This committee is the final ap-
peal board for faculty members
However, their cases will not
go to this committee unless the
President recommends dismissal.
If dismissal is recommended the
faculty members have five days
in which to request a hearing be-
fore the Sub-committee. This com-
mittee then makes its recommen-
dations to the Board of Regents
which will take the final action.
According to a report from the
Senate Advisory Committee, that
committee has not "attempted to
define or recommend in advance
the specific criteria by which the
suspended faculty members should
be judged."

Meanwhile, to assist him in
making a recommendation to the
Senate Advisory Committee, the
President has asked three com-
mittees to investigate the cases of
the three suspenaed men.
Two of these committees have
finished their investigation. They
are the executive committee of
the literary college and the exec-
utive committee of the medical
school.
The committee which is now
meeting and discussing the case
with the President is an ad hoc
committee appointed by the Sen-
ate Advisory Committee. This
committee consists of five faculty
members chosen from the entire
faculty.
If after consultation with this
committee and University officials
the President decides to take no
action against the three faculty
members, they will be reinstated
Russian Study
ProgramSet

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