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July 21, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

PAGE FOUR.~

T H E MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, .TULY 21, 1951

Area Study
Maps Wage
Differences
College may seem all work and
no play at times, but it generally
pays off in the long run according
to a report on family income re-
leased by the Survey Research
Center.
The Detroit Area Study, asso-
ciated with the Survey Research
Center, shows that generally the
better-educated the family-head,
the higher the family income.
* * *
MORRIS AXELROD, Director of
the study points out, however,
this may be because higher in-
come families are more likely to
send their children to college than
lower income families.
Supported- by the Ford Foun-
dation, the Detroit Area Study
is a continuing research pro-
gram to uncover facts about the
social characteristics of the area
through the use of modern social
science methods.
During February and March,
1,253 families were interviewed,
with the family income study be-
ing only one of the many sta-
tistical reports compiled from in-
formation gathered in the inter-
views.
THE DETROIT Area Study re-
port also shows that the median.
Detroit family's income is $5,028,
a rise of 10 per cent from 1951.
Parallelling nationwide trends,
the rise indicated that Detroit
maintained its relatively high fam-
ily income.
Two or more working adults
in over 31 per cent of the fami-
lies may have something to do
with the high family income.
In fact, 46 per cent of all fam-
ilies with incomes of $5,000 and
up have more than' one adult
wage-earner, not taking into ac-
count those working who are un-
der 21.
* * *
MANAGERS, officials, and pro-
prietors show the highest median
income, th6 lowest being service
and unskilled workers. Skilled
workers receive higher pay than;
clerics and kindred workers and
professionals are second in fam-
ily income to the managerial
group.
Where the heads of families
'have reached the graying age,
incomes are considerably high-
er. However, after the age of
60, there is a sharp drop. -
A description of the Detroit
Arepa Study's program may be ob-
tained from its annual publication,
"A Social Profile of Detroit." The+
1953 addition will be issued this
summer.

SHAKESPEARE-ON-THE-AVON:
Canadian Festival Stars Guinness

Special To The Daily
STRATFORD, Ontario - Can-
ada's Stratford-on-the-Avon has
never had the theatrical activity
of its namesake across the At-
lantic.
Today, however, on the banks
of a rather muddy Avon, what
townspeople call "a modern Globe
Theater," has been erected in the
form of a huge tent, housing a
Shakespearean Festival scheduled
to run through Saturday, Aug-
ust 15.
A COMPANY of professional
Canadian actors have converged
upon this Pon-theatrical town,
bringing with them housing and
transportation problems as well
as a boom in the tourist trade.
Director Tyrone Guthrie of
the Old Vic Theater in London
is the guiding hand behind
"All's Well That Ends Well" and
"Richard III," staged on alter-
nate nights.
The slight bald comedian of
"Lavender Hill Mob" fame, Alec
Guinness has journeyed to this
railroad shop village of 18,000
people to play a controversial in-
terpretation of Richard III and
the King of France in "All's Well
That Ends Well."
IRENE WORTH, also of the Old
Vic, is Helena in the comedy and
Margaret in "Richard."
Critics and audiences seem to.
agree that the staging and cos-
tuming are compensation for
the heat and humidity inside
the tent.
Pomp and pageantry, a battle
with several dozen participants
and the elaborate costuming by
Tanya Moiseiwutsch convene on
a fixed wooden stage of several
planes and elevations which be-
comes dungeon, castle, tower or
battlefield for "Richard III" and
background for the company's
modern dress . version of "All's
Well That Ends Well."
Study Surveys
Stock Values 1
Once considered on a par with
gambling, the purchase of com-
mon stocks has "become an inte-
gral part of our economic life," a
University Business Study on
"Common Stock Values and
Yields" reveals.
Written by Prof. Wilford J. Eite-
man, of finance department, and
Frank P. Smith, director of the
Bureau of Business Research, the
report was published by the bu-
reau.
Main topic of the text is a study
of common stocks as long-term in-
vestments, with particular empha-
sis placed on yields.]

l.7

* * *

Dance Clinic
Theory and practice of square
dancing will be combined in a
clinic sponsored by the Sum-
mer Session institute for dan-
cing today.
From 3 to 4 p.m. at Water-
man Gymnasium the institute
will provide a clinic for callers
followed by a discussion from
4 to 5 p.m. on the availability
of resource materials on square
dancing.
An all - community dance
from 8 to 10 p.m. at Palmer
Field tennis courts will climax
the days events.

Ieach Ball Set
Amid palm trees, fishnets. life
preservers and umbrella covered
tables, the Beach Ball, the
League's high spot in summer
dance activities will take place
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday in
the League Ballroom.
Al Townsend and his orchestra
will provide the music for the in-
formal dance, only late permis-
sion dance of the season.

FIRST LESSON FREE
TONIGHT AT 7
in 6 WEEKS d
TYPING OPTIONAL
Over 200 Schools in U. S. will assist you in review or placement
ENROLL TODAY before Summer enrollments are closed.
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded 1915 Phone 7831 State & Williams St's.

q igantic C/earance

Band Meeting
Will Continue
A panel discussion on the high
school marching band, at 10 a.m.
today in the Vandenberg Rm. of
the League, will be the featured
meeting as the National Band
Conductors Conference Workshop
goes into its second day.
James Dunlop, conductor of the
Pennsylvania State College Band
will lead the discussion.
An exhibit of band uniforms, in-
struments and other items per-
taining to bands, is on display
throughout the week-long confer-
ence in the second floor of the
League.
Music for the marching band
will be discussed at 9 a.m. in the=
Vandenberg Rm.
At 1 and 4:15 p.m. today in Hilli
Auditorium, the Summer Session
Band will conduct reading sessions:
under the direction of Prof. Wil-
liam D. Revelli and James Neil-
son, guest conductor.
At 7:15 p.m. in the Vandenberg
Rm., George Cavender, assistant
conductor of the Michigan bands,
will lead a discussion on "Justj
How Do You Chart Your Shows"!
and percussion pointers for the!
Marching Band.
Slated for tomorrow at the
Workshop will be a concert by the
Cass High School Band, Harry
Begian conductor, at 8:30 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium.
Admission. to all events in the
five day meeting is open to the
public without charge.

7
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AND CORONETS-Alec Guinness portrays the murderer king,
Richard III in Stratford, Ontario's Shakespearean Festival.

Events
The Conference on Speech Com-
munication in Business and In-
dustry will continue with a lec-
ture by L. Lamont Okey, of the
speech department on "Communi-
cation for Informative Purposes"
at 9 a.m. in East Conference Room
of Rackham.
Following at 10:45 a.m. will be
a talk by Prof. Hayden K. Car-
ruth of the speech department on
"Communication Designed to Per-
suade."
The luncheon at 12:15 p.m. will
feature an address by L. Clayton
Hill of the Business Administra-
tion School.
"PRESENT STATUS of Pris-
matic Roof Construction" will be
discussed by Prof. Lawrence C.
Maugh of the Civil Engineering

YE
OF

SRS
THE

HE

LL

Today
Department at 4 p.m. in 311 West
Engineering Bldg.
* *
PROF. FELIKS Gross of Brook-
lyn College, authority on Eastern
Europe and the Soviet Union will
be here this week to lecture and
meet with two classes in the po-
litical science department.
A member of the Polish delega-
tion to the Quebec and San Fran-
cisco Conferences and to UNRRA,
Prof. Gross will speak on the "Fu-
ture of Central and Eastern Eur-
ope" at 4:15 p.m. in Auditorium
D, Angell Hall, under the auspices
of the sociology and political
science departments.
THE REV. J. Frazer Mclusky
will speak on "Techniques of Adult
Education" at 4:15 p.m. in the
Lane Hall Library,
The Scottish Minister is in the
United States for an eight. week
period on an exchange plan be-
tween the National Council of
Churches and the British Council
of Churches.
GORDON E. PETERSON of Bell
Telephone Laboratories will lec-
ture before the Linguistic Forum
on "The Acoustical Structure of
Speech at 7:30 p.m. in Rackham
Amphitheater.
Golf Sessions
End This Week
The women's physical education
department is concluding its sum-
mer activities this week with a
golf clinic and a session on the
green.
The last of three golf clinics
will be held at 7 p.m. tomorrow in
the use of long irons and woods.
The group will meet at the Wo-
men's Athletic Building and go
out to Palmer Field for the golf
session.
For the Second Annual Ladies
Day on Thursday, the first nine
holes of the University Golf
Course have been reserved and
teeing off will begin at 2 p.m.
Ryukyu Students
Enter 'U' in Fall
Five students from the tiny
East China Islands of Ryukyus
will enroll at the University this
fall for a year's study under the
student exchange program spon-
sored by the Army Department.
The five, chosen from thousands
of applicants on the basis of com-
petitive examinations and per-
sonal interviews will study educa-
tion, naval engineering, sociology
and English.
Participants in the exchange
program agree to work in some
public service activity for at least

f4
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SUMMER STORE HOURS
Monday, Noon 'til 8:30 P.M.
Tues. thru Fri. 9:30 to 5:30
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Greeting Cards
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