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July 18, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-18

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PACE POtT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY S, 1953

a nu.ur a. v va . . e.._. .. . a ._ --
___-_

REVISITS ALMA MATER:
Lippman Discusses University Theater
__ A? * - * *

By PAT ROELOFS
Gray - mustached southerner,
Prof. Munroe Lippman, here on
a three week visit to his alma ma-
ter claims to have spent half his
life at the University.
Claiming 'that he is apparently
unable to leave "dear Ann Arbor"
permanently, he is back this sum-
mer to direct the Speech Depart-
ment's forthcoming production of
"Country Girl."
A MICHIGAN man, Prof. Lipp-
man received his A.B., M.A. and
PhD degrees in speech at the Uni-
versity.
Now chairman of the Depart-
ment of Theater and Speech at
Tulane University, he manages
to return frequently to direct
summer session speech depart-
ment productions. His last pro-
duction here was in 1950 when
he did "The Time of Your Life"
by William Saroyan.
Prof. Lippman is also director
of Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Car-
-re, famous community theater in
New Orleans. During the past year
he has directed such Broadway
favorites as "Stalag 17," "Come
Back Little 'Sheba" and "Berkeley
Square.".
COMMENTING on the Clifford
Odet's drama "Country Girl,"
Lippman said that this play, un-
like the majority of Odets' plays
which are "socially significant,"
is about personalities the play-
wright has known. He beleives
that Odets has portrayed these
people in effective theatrical
terms.
"I'd rather have aplaywright
pull you up in your seat, than
expose the audience to a dull,
well written play," he continued,
and this he believes is Odets
strong point as a playwright.
"Odets writes with color and;
poetry," Prof. Lippman pointed
out.
Discussing the differences in
University and professional theat-
er, and the role of college thea-
ter direction as a basis of profes-
sional preparation, director Lipp-
man commented that the main
task of, the theater in a liberal
arts college is to give the univer-
sity community access tonvarious
types of plays in many centuries
of playwriting. In this way, the
participating students also re-
ceive some basis for professional
stage work.
* *
COMPARING Tulane and the
University speech and theater stu-
dents, Prof. Lippman reminded
local spectators that because of
the size of the University, aspir-
ing young actors don't get into
the act until their junior year,

-Daily-Chuck Ritz
'COUNTRY GIRL' TALKS WITH DIRECTOR LIPPMANN
* * * * * *

and carry on with graduate stu-
dents.
At Tulane, on the other hand,
because of a smaller enrollment,,
freshmen are able to perform in
student productions and receive
on stage training for four or more
years.
The attitude of. actors at the
University, is excellent, according
to Prof. Lippman; "They are all
conscientious workers."
Joining Prof. Lippman in his
three-week Ann Arbor visit are
Mrs. Lippman and the family
poodle Gigi. Speech students re-
port that Gigi has accompanied
her master to "Country Girl"
rehearsals. "She interrupts,"
Scotch Minister
To Speak Hsere
A Scotch Minister, the Rev. J.
Frazer McLuskey, will be in Ann
Arbor Monday through Saturday
to give two lectures, take part in
a luncheon discussionk pandrtalk
with summer session students.
He will speak at 4:15 p.m. Tues-
day in Lane Hall Library on
"Techniques of Adult Religious
Education" and at 4:15 p.m. Fri-
day on "The State of Religion in
Britain."
The former Chaplain of the
University of Glasgow will also
take part in a luncheon discussion
on "Wartime Experience in France
with the Underground Move-
ment" at 12:15 p.m. Thursday.

Lippman laughs, "so I have td
leave her home."
Prof. Lippman concluded a con-
versation with reporters by hint-
ing that box office sales are now
open for "Country Girl" tickets,
the play opening on Wednesday
night in Lydia Mendelssohn the-
ater.
U.. Refuses
SoapyDefense
Conference
LANSING -(P) - Secretary of
Defense C. E. Wilson has rejected
Gov. Williams' request for a con-
ference on Detroit's future in de-
fense production, the Executive
Office said.-
The office said Wilson denied
published reports that the De-,
fense Department plans to bypass
Detroit on future defense con-
tracts. Wilson asserted that,
therefore, the conference would
be unnecessary.
WILLIAMS SAID he was glad
to get Wilson's denial, but he
thought the conference should
have been held. The Governor
said the State Employment Secur-
ity Commission reported about 14,-
800 factory workers will be af,
fected by defense contract cut-
backs now in the making.
"Under these circimstances,"
Williams said, "it seems to me we
should be given every opportunity
to know what faces Michigan in-
dustry and to take the necessary
steps to cushion the economic

Iook and/i4teth
By DONALD HARRIS
The weekend's schedule on Ra-
dio and TV is not as full as other
weeks mainly because too many
regular shows are on vacation,
but there are a few musical, poli-
tical and theatrical programs on
the agenda.
Senator William Knowland (R-
Cal.) heads the guest list on CBS:
Radio's "Washington U.S.A." from,
5 to 5:30 p.m. today.
Mutual Security Director Har-
old E. Stassen will be "Man of
The Week" on the CBS Television
public affairs program, 4:30-5:00
p.m. tomorrow.
* * *
SOPRANO Camilla Williams
will sing a group of classical and
modern songs as guest soloist on
CBS Radio's new Sunday series,
"The Music Room" from 9 to 9:15
a.m. tomorrow. The concert by
the Grant Park Symphony Or-
chestra from 10 to 11 p.m. Wed-
nesday on CBS Radio, will feature'
Patricia Neway, soprano, in arias
by Bizet and Beethoven.
Madeleine Carroll and Gary
Merrill star on "Willy's Thea-
tre Presenting Ben Hecht's Tales
of Fhe City," on CBS Television,
7:30-8 p.m. Thursday. For this
broadcast Hecht has written the
tale of a famous Broadway bea-
uty who scores a hit in a splay
by her former husband.
Norman Cousins, editor of the
Saturday Review of Literature, has
chosen Albert Schweitzer's "Out
of My Life and Thought" for dis-
cussion on CBS Radio's "Invita-
tion to Learning," 11:35 to noon,
Sunday, July 26.
9 * *
A STAR-STUDDED guest roster
-Isabel Bigley, Bill Hayes, Joan
McCracken, Farley Granger, Rose-
mary Clooney, and Van Heflin-'
will greet Ed Sullivan on his re-
turn after a five week vacation to
"Toast of the Town" on CBS
Television, 7 to 8 p.m. Sunday,
July 26.
Cuyler To Discuss
Stanley Pro grain
A discussion of the program to
be played Tuesday by the Stanley
Quartet will be given by Prof.
Louise Cuyler of the music school
at 4:15 p.m. Monday in Auditor-
ium D, Angell Hall.
Prof. Cuyler will discuss Prof.
Ross Lee Finney's Quintet with
Piano (1953) which will be played
for the first time by the Stanley
Quartet.

SL Movie
SL Cinema Guild will feature
Alec Guinness and Stanley Hol-
loway in "Lavender Hill Mob"
today and tomorrow.
The movie concerns a mou-
sey bank clerk, played by Alec
Guinness, who conceives and
engineers a mammoth plot to
steal and smuggle a hoard of
gold bullion out of England to
France.
Performances are today at
6:30, 8, and 9:30 p.m. and to-
morrow at 8 p.m. only.
Hip Ailment
Rietires Taft
For Sessionl
NEW YORK-(A)-Sen. Robert
A. Taft, hospitalized with a hip
ailment, yesterday gave up any
prospect of getting back into the
legislative harness before the pre-
sent term of Congress ends.
But the Ohio Republican is ex-
pected to continue in close touch
with affairs at the Capitol.

New Clinic
Organized
For Dancing
You can add square dancing to
the ever increasing list of Sum-
mer Session institutes.
Whether you dance, call, or are
just plain interested in square
dancing, the Summer Session in-
stitute for square dancing has
programs of general interest sche-
duled for every Tuesday.
FROM 3 TO 4 P.M. there will
be a clinic for callers, with em-
phasis on phrasing, sounding
equipment, latest calls and the
technique of teaching.

FROM HIS bed in New York
Hospital, the 63-year-old sena-
tor sent out word that he doesn't
intend to get back to Washington
by the time Congress winds up its;
session late this month or early
next.
Nine days ago, Taft under-
went an operation. A hospital
bulletin yesterday said "no com-
plications of any kind have de-
veloped," his condition is "good,"
and bandages and stitches will
be removed next week.
But the hospital,.noting that no,
date has been set for Taft's de-
parture from the hospital, said:
* * *
"SEN. TAFT does not intend to
return to his duties at this ses-
sion of Congress, which apparent-
ly will end in August."
The Republican target for ad-
journment is July 31 or Aug. 1.
Taft, troubled by a bad hip for
several months, gave up active
Republican floor leadership of the
Senate to Sen. Knowland of Cali-
fornia last June 10, but retained
the title of majority floor leader.
Board Outlaws
Pets at MSC
EAST LANSING-(P)-A col-
lection of pets, accumulated since
the war, is going to be gradually
eliminated at Michigan State Col-
lege.
The State Board of Agriculture,
college governing body, approved
a resolution requiring new tenants
at the married students housing
project to pledge that they would-
n't bring pets on campus.
* * * ;
STUDENTS WHO now have
pets will be allowed to keep them.
Karl H. McDonel, board sec-
retary, said the problem had got-
ten out of hand since with the
influx of veterans after the war
the married students were al-
lowed to have pets.
"Nearly every family has one
cat or dog," he said. "Some of
them have more. Not little dogs
either-big ones. And some of
them are raising dogs."

The availability of resource
materials, such as books, rec-
ords, and magazines will be dis-
cussed from 4 to 5 p.m. Both of
these meetings will be held at
Waterman Gymnasium.
An all-community square dance
will top off the evening from 8 to
10 p.n). at the Palmer Field ten-
nis courts. In case of rain, the
dance will be held in the Women's
Athletic Bldg.
* * *
THE INSTITUTE is sponsored
by the department of physical ed-
ucation for men in cooperation
with the department- of physical
education for women. It is open
to both men and women.
In charge of the event are Ar-
thur Carty of Detroit, and How-
ard Leibee of the department of
physical education for men.
Ac tress Dies
TANNERSVILLE, N.Y.- ()--
Maude Adams, whose "Peter Pan"
established her as one of the
greatest actresses in the history
of the American stage, died Fri-
day at the age of 80.

Variety will keynote the next
three faculty concerts sponsored
by the music school,, as local au-
diences will be able to hear on
three successive days woodwind
music, early organ works, and a
world's premiere.
Playing at 4:15 pm. tomorrow
in Hill Auditorium, Prof. Robert
Noehren, University Organist, has
programmed six works all written
between the years 1180 and 1707,
along with two contemporary
pieces.
* * *
OPENING WITH a Trio: Orga-
num Triplex, by Perotin Le
Grand, Prof. Noehren will then
play works of Sweelinck, Scheidt,
and Buxtehude. Paul Hindemith's
Sonata No. 1, and Heinrich Ka-
minski's Toccata will comprise the
contemporary part of the pro-
gram.
At 8:30 p.m. Monday in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall, the Univer-
sity Woodwind Quintet will, of-
fer a change from the concert
series, which thus far has shown.
off predominantly string colors.
Although the composers to be
played are rarely performed in
Ann Arbor, each has made many
contributions to woodwind liter-.
ature.
THE PROGRAM consists of six
works. Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme
by Bartos, Perischetti's Pastoral,
Weis' Serenade, and Mortensen's
Quintette.
Hartley's Divertissement and
Thuille's Sextett are to be per-
formed.
The members of the Quintet
are Nelson Hauenstein, flute;
Lare Wardrop, oboe, Lewis Coo-
per, bassoon; Ted Evans, French
horn; Albert Luconi, clarinet.

FACULTY TO PLAY:
Varied Concerts Planned
For Campus Audiences

Wilbur Perry, pianist will assist
the group.
The world's premiere of Prof.
Ross Lee Finney's Quintet with Pi-
ano (1953) will highlight the sec-
ond concert of the Stanley Quar-
tet at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
s* *
THE SOLOIST in this work will
be Prof. Marian Owen, pianist.
Also on the program is Beetho-
ven's Quaret in C minor, Op. 18,
No. 4, and Mozart's Quartet in D
major, K. 575.
Admission to all concerts is op-
en to the public without charge.
German Films
Slated Monday
Legend and fantasy will be the
theme of the fourth in a series of
motion pictures depicting the de-
velopment of the movies, to be
shown at 7:30 p.m. Monday in
Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
Featured on the bill will be
two German-produced films of the
'20's: "The Treasure," directed
by G. W. Pabst and starring Wer-
ner Kraus as a bellwright ruined
by his lust for gold, and "Nosfera-
tu," directed by F. W. Murnau.
Max Schreck stars in this 1922
"unofficial" version of Braun Sto-
ker's "Dracula."
A supplementary program to
the symposium on Popular Arts in
America, the movies are open to
the public free of charge.

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1429 Hill Street

DAILY

OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

invites you to its

Soviet Authority
To SpeakTuesday
An authority on Eastern Eur-
ope and the Soviet Union, Prof.
Feliks Gross of New York Uni-
versity Graduate School and
Brooklyn College will be at the
University Tuesday to discuss the
"Future of Central and Eastern
Europe."
Sponsored jointly by the soci-
ology and the political science he-
partments, Prof. Gross will speak
at 4:15 p.m. in Auditorium D, An-
gell Hall.

OPEN HOUSE

on

(Continued from Page 2)
La p'tite causette meets Monday July
20 from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. in the wing of
the north room of the Michigan Union
cafeteria. All students andgFaculty
members interested in speaking or
learning to speak French in a friendly
atmosphere are cordially invited.
Popular Arts Films. Legend and Fan-
tasy: The Treasure and Nosferatu,
Monday, 7:30 p.m. Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.

Sunday, July 19, at 8:00 P.M.

MUSIC

i DANCING

0 REFRESHMENTS

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BRING YOUR FRIENDS * EVERYONE WELCOME

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NOW IN ANN ARBOR
HORTHAN Uses ABC's Day and Evening
Easiest and Quickest System
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TYPING OPTIONAL
Over 200 Schools in U. S. will assist you in review or placement.
ENROLL TODAY before Summer enrollments are closed.
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded 1915 Phone 7831 State & Williams Sts-

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service with sermon by the pas-
tor, "As the Word of Men, Yet The Inspired
Word of God." (4th in summer series on
"Paradoxes in Christianity").
Sunday at 2:30: Meet at Center for Lake Outing,
Picnic Supper, Outdoor Vesper Service. Phone
3-5560 for information.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
William S. Baker, University Pastor
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Dr. Kuizenga
preaching "The Incidental Virtue."
2:00 P.M.: Summer Student Fellowship meet at
the Church for outing and picnic at Silver Lake.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
10:00 A'M.: Student Bible Class studies "The
Book of Job."
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship. Seftnon topic "The
Test of [deeds."
6:00 P.M.: }Roger Williams Student Guild: Will
leave for a picnic. A Worship Service will be
held.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M.: Bible Class.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service-Sermon by Rev.
Yoder.
4:00 P.M.: Leave Center for Picnic at Hagen
Home on Traver Road.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: "And God Remembered."
7:30 P.M.: "The Failure of Unbelief."
Wed. 8:00: Prayer Meeting.
A Friendly Church where the Word is preached.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8:00 A.M., 10:00 A.M., 11:30 A.M.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)

8:00 A.M.:
9:00. A.M.:
10:00 A.M.:
House.
11:00 A.M.:
11:00 A.M.:
12:15 P.M.:,
6:00 P.M.:.
Lounge.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Theodore Smale, "Whole-Hearted Religion."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Informal discussion group, "The
Christian Student and the World Struggle"
The Political Struggle.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship, "The Second
Prayer to Memorize" Dr. Large, preaching.
3:00 P.M.: Meet in Wesley Lounge for picnic
outing at nearby lake. Swimming, volleyball,
picnic supper and evening Vesper service. All
students welcome.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine

11

Holy Communion.
Holy Communion and Commentary.
Student Breakfast, Lounge of Parish
Church School (thru 6th grade).
Morning Prayer and Sermon.
After-Service Fellowship.
Student Buffet Supper and Speaker,
8:00 PM.: Eensong St. ichae' hpl

PR-UNVR ALE

11

of

MEN'S FOOTWEAR

8:00 P.M.: Evensong, St. Michael's Chapel
During the Week:
Wednesday, 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion; Friday,
12:10 P.M.: Holy Communion; Friday 4:00-
6:00 P.M.: Student Tea in Lounge of Parish
House.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING Lane Hall
11:00 A.M. Sundays. Visitors welcome.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School,
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
July 19-Life
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.

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THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Thursdacev 730 P.M . Bible Study.

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