100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 08, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

v

PAGE FOUR TH E MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY t 'R5

U

'U' Sponsors
Latin Study
Workshop
By ELSIE KUFFLER
English . . is it a corruption of
the Ancient Latin tongue?
No, says Prof. Waldo E. Sweet
of the summer program in lin-
guistics, English and Latin each
have their own individual system
of grammar. In fact, English in
some respect has an even more
complicated system.
* * *
TO HELP do away with this
common misconception and many
others resulting from erroneous
teaching of Latin, the University's
Latin Workshop, under the direc-
tion of Prof. Sweet, is advocating
a new approach to the teaching of
the language.
This new approach is based
on the 100-year old science of
linguistics which deals with an-
alysis o languages. According to
Prof. Sweet, before the science
of linguistics had been fully de-
veloped, it had been assumed
that all languages conformed to
a "universal grammar"
This rule was especially applied
to English and Latin. With the
aid of linguistics however, it has
been discovered that English is
basicly structurally different from
Latin. While Latin indicates the
doer of the action in a sentence by
the form of the noun or the de-
clension, English declines declen-
sions, so to speak, using word order
instead.
THE SYSTEM of comparing
English to Latin in teaching the
latter is therefore ineffective be-
cause Latin is dissimilar to Eng-
lish in so many ways. To replace
this system, the Latin Workshop
advocates contrasting the differ-
ences in the languages.
In order to carry out this
method in the classroom, the
Workshop is engaged in prepar-
ing teaching material that will
best exemplify its new philoso-
phy toward the nature of lan-
guage and the way it should be
taught.
The Workshop is also training
teachers in the utilization of tape
recorders, records, slides, film
strips, and oral work. Many of
these new techniques resemble
those used by the army in teach-
ing modern languages.
* * *
THE TWO CHIEF aims of the
Latin Workshop are to prepare
teaching material for teachers
trained in the new light of teach-
ing Latin and to eventually in-
culcate into textbooks those teach-
ing devices which are found def-
initely beneficial.
Working on a grant from the
Carnegie Foundation, the Latin
Workshop is composed of 21 teach-
ers who will employ its findings
and products this year in their
classes.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
Physical Education Department. Or-
chestra and chorus are under the di-
rection of Paul Miller, Grad., Music.
The entire production is under the di-
rection 'of Professor. William P. Hal-
stead of the Department of Speech.
La p'tite causette meets today from
3:30 to 5:00 in the wing of the north
room of the Michigan Union cafeteria.
All students and Faculty members in-

terested in speaking or learning to
speak French in a friendly atmosphere
are cordially invited.
8:08p.m.yPresbyterian Summer Stu-
dent Fellowship will meet to study,
"The Unfolding Drama of the Bible"
by Bernhard Anderson.
Coming Events
Summer Session French Club. Meet-
ing on Thursday, July 9, at 8:00 p.m.
in the Michigan League. Professor Ben-
jamin F. Bart, of the Romance Lan-
guage Department will speak on: "Un
hiver en France." French songs, games
and a social hour. All students and
Faculty members interested are cor-
dially invited.
Hillel Foundation: "Music Calling"
on Thursday, July 9, 1953 at 8 p.m.
Classical music on the Hi-Fi System.
Refreshments. All students welcome.
There will be a weekly tea in the
form of a garden party at the Madelon
Pound House, 1024 Hill Street, from 4:30
to 5:30 Thursday afternoon, July 9.
Thursday Lunch Discussion at Lane
- Hall. Dr. Amiya Chakravarty, visiting
professor from U. of Kansas and Cal-
cutta will be resource person, talking
on "Modern India" 12:15 noon. Call res-
ervations to 3-1511, Ext. 2851. Everyone
welcome.
Overseas Teachers, DA Civilians, peo-
ple interested in government service
overseas are invited to have dinner in
the Michigan League Cafeteria on
Thursday, July 9, going through the
line from 5:30-6:00 and meeting at a
table marked Overseas Personnel. Tele-
phone 3-1511 Ext. 360 for more infor-
mation.
Classical Studies Coffee Hour. Thurs-
day. July 9. 4:00 nm., in the Musum nf

Beat the Heat

Events
The Symposium on X-Ray Dif-
fraction will continue with a talk
by P. P. Ewald of the Brooklyn
Polytechnic Institute on "Fourier
Transformation and X-Ray Dif-
fraction by Crystals" at 9 a.m.
today in 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
Prof. William N. Lipscomb of
the University of Minnesota will
follow with a talk on "Experimen-
tal Studies of Crystal Structures:
The Structure Factor and the Re-
ciprocal Lattice" at 10 a.m.
* * *
"Variescripts: Sampling Meth-
ods and Preliminary Counts" will
be discussed by Prof. MacCurdy
Burnet of the Maryland State
Teachers College at the Lin-
guistic Luncheon Meeting at
12:10 p.m. today in the dining
room of the Michigan League.
"Galaxies: Their Composition
and Structure" will be the topic
discussed at the Symposium on
Astrophysics by Walter Baade, Mt.
Wilson and Palomar observatories
at 2 p.m. today in 1400 Chemistry
Bldg.
"Gene Function" will be dis-
cussed by G. W. Beadle of the
California Institute of Technol-

f

Today
ogy at 4:15 p.m. today in 1300
Chemistry Bldg.
Also as part of the radiation
biology symposium Prof. Roberts
Rugh, of Columbia University
will lecture on Effects of Ioniz-
ing Radiations on Vertebrate
Embryonic Growth and Devel-
opment" at 8 p.m. in 1300 Chem-
istry Bldg.
At 8:30 today in Hill Auditorium,
Richard Harper will give an organ
recital.
The program will include works
by Buxtehude, Bach, Langlais, Al-
ain, and Durufle.
Art Exhibition
A University student and an
Ann Arbor resident recently had
paintings selected for exhibition
in the 18th Annual Mid-Year Show
of American Art now being held at
the Butler Art Institute, Youngs-
town Ohio.
Works by Jamie Ross, Grad.,
and William Lewis are among the
311 paintings in the show, which
represents 30 states and the Dis-
trict of Columbia.

1 T
1 tit .P
v f
S
WcNe Campus ivear

(

J ULY

4

eave it to us to concoct a glorious sale in

the middle

of Summer, with

wardrobe,

sparkers to round out your summer dresses.
Sizes 9 to 15,

0 4

Travel-wear . .. Sports fare
. .. cool dresses for every-
where. All reduced to a mite
in care and price.
Hurry in while our selection
is big and bubbling with
right-ems for now or for
next year.

10 to 44,
121/2 to 29 t/.
Just off
So. University
ON FOREST . . .
Patrons Parking
Lot In Rear

NO MATTER how hot it gets in Chicago these youngsters on the
west side don't mind it. Their enterprising mothers set out large
wash tubs filled with cool water and the happy youngsters splash
away to their hearts' content. Many an overheated adult pauses
on his way and views the scene with envy as Chicagoans swelter
with the temperature in the nineties.
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING QUICK RESULTS

Just rrived!
tlExquisite Evening Bags v
with Matching Belts 0
0 INDIA ART SHOP
330 Maynard

READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

I

.
i

ON SALE TO..DAYk!

- .I

1

including

names,

home

addresse
I phone

S and
numbers

r.

Ann

Arbor

addresses

and

of

Summer

Session

students

Only

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan