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July 07, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-07

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PA" MUMT~

THE MICHIGAN VAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 1953

Knickerbocker Props TaxIngenuity

REVEILLE OR REVELRY:
-token Deferment Cut
Perplexes Draft Bait
By LARRY SUKENIC

* * 4'

* * *

.* * *

* * * *

By FRAN SHELDON
Transformation of a normal bi-
ped into a peg-legged colonial ty-
coon tends to create considerable
problems for the prop man of any
production.
In the speech department's pres-
entation of "Knickerbocker Holi-
day," this problem has been tack-
led with both foam and sponge
rubber, ironing board covers,
leather straps and hunks of wood.
ONE OF NUMEROUS staging
difficulties encountered in this
show, the present finished product
is the result of considerable re-
search.
The eight pound wooden
stump in which Anthony Georgi-
las, Grad., thumps his way
through the Maxwell Anderson-
Kurt Weill musical comedy is
the end product of four differ-
ent attempts, the first three of
which were either "too loose, too
uncomfortable, or too bouncy."
With his left leg strapped up,
around and behind him, Georgilas
explained that unless the wooden
limb fit nearly perfectly it would
prove "too uncomfortable to keep
on."
Using the present instrument,
however, he is able to go up and
down stairs and ramps, stomp
around even do a jig with com-
parative ease.
THE RATHER unusual hanging
called for in the script in which
James Umphry, Grad., is suspend-
ed from his waist for is full min-
ute was solved by a wide con-
cealed leather belt that works on
a pully arrangement.
' Sentenced to be hanged for his
misdeeds, Umphry will be hauled
up from below by a number of bur-
ley cast members.
Arrows that appear to have
come from hostile Indians in the
far distant off-stage complete this
Sprop man's nightmare. They will
pop suddenly into view, the result
of a hidden crew member and a
spring arrangement guaranteed to
make the quivering shafts really

-Daily-Lon Qui
FINISHED PRODUCT OF PROPMAN'S INGENUITY

Events Today

THE SPEECH and the Preacher'
Conferences will continue with
workout sessions at 9:30 a.m. and
group instruction at 1:30 p.m.
Prof. G. E. Densmore, chairman
of the speech department, will
give a talk entitled "The After-
Dinner Speech" at 11 a.m. and
Rev. W. P. Lemon will speak on
"Preaching to This Age" at 3:15
p.m., both in Rackham Amphi-
theater.
THE FIRST SERIES of choral
demonstrations sponsored by the
School of Music will be concluded
at 11 a.m. in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.
Prof. Maynard Klein of the
music school will be the conductor.
Participation in the siuaing is
open to the public.
PROF. GEORGE Gamow of
George Washington University will
continue his lecture series on "Evo-
lution of Stars and Galaxies" to-
READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

day at 2 p.m. in 1400 Chemistry
Bldg. Following him will be Prof.
Gerard P. Kuiper of the Univer-
sity of- Chicago who will discuss
"The Origin of the Solar System"
at 3:30 p.m.
"AN EVALUATION of Plastic
Analysis Applied to Structural De-
sign" will be the topic of a talk
by Prof. Bruce G. Johnston of the
engineering college at 4 p.m. in
311 West Engineering Bldg.
* * *
THE RADIATION biology sym-
posium will continue with a lec-
ture on "The Use of Radiation in
Studies of Gene Action" given by
Prof. G. W. Beadle of the Cali-
fornia Institute of Technology at
4:15 p.m. in 1300 Chemitry Bldg.
ALAN GOWANS of Rutgers Uni-
versity, visiting assistant profes-
sor of the fine arts department
will give a gallery talk on "Amer-
ica's New Folk Art" at 4:15 p.m.
in Auditorium D, Angell Hall.
* * *
PROF. Paul L. Garvin of George-
town University will speak on "An
Empirical Analysis of Linguistic
eaning" at 7:30 p.m. in Rackham
Amphitheater.

Stress Ideas
Not Grammar
Says Speaker
"To avoid anxiety neurosis,"
students should concentrate more
on ideas when writing and speak-
ing rather than the thousand pit-
falls of grammar, the Conference
of English Teachers was told yes-
terday.
According to Joseph Blumenthal
of Mackenzie High School in De-
troit, the study of grammar should
be simplified so that it remains
a means instead of becoming an,
end in teaching English.
GRAMMAR should be taught in
non-technical terms with very lit-
tle nomenclature used in the be-
ginning grades, Blumenthal said.
He blasted "word by word
identification of parts of speech"
as an anachronism.
Blumenthal debunked the state-
ment about liberal battlecry of
"anything goes." He added, how-
ever, that many usage rules are
"dead letters" and drew an an-
alogy between clothes and' lan-
guage in determining usage. In
each case, he said, appropriate-
ness to the occasion should be
stressed.
To English teachers worried
about lack of teaching matter re-
sulting from de-emphasis and
simplification of grammar, Blu-
menthal pointed out: all that will
be left for English teachers tc
teach are the real important

With President Eisenhower considering a token cui in college
draft deferments and a draft call of 23,000 men scheduled for July,
the lowest Selective Service quota since last June, the student under
Selective Service finds himself uncertain about his future.
The token cut in college deferments now before President Eisen-
hower would affect only a small percentage of this year's freshmen
and seniors who plan to go on to graduate school.
* * . * *
ALTHOUGH NO OFFICIAL word has been received by the Uni-
versity about any change in the grades necessary on the Selective
Service college qualification test, this year's freshman will have to
receive a grade of 72, rather than 70, or stand in the upper one-
third, rather than the upper half of his freshman class according to
the National Manpower Council recommendations in line with the
token cut in deferments.
Under the council's proposal seniors who plan to go on to
graduate school will have to score 80 or higher on the test, rather
than the present 70.
Discussing the lowered draft call for this month, spokesmen for
the University have pointed out student deferments will not be af-
fected in any way. Because of the low quantity of available man-
power more students will have to be called up to fill the quota, they
say.
AS TO THE POPULAR charge the draft is cutting into the supply
of scientists, doctors, and engineers, University spokesmen pointed
out there is no deferment discrimination in the various fields
of study being pursued by the student, but the only criteria for de-
ferment has been and still is, scholastic standing and college qualifi-
cation test scores.
University spokesmen commenting on the proposed token
cut in draft deferments now before the President stated that they
do not expect any unusual change in the male student enrollment
because of this, but added that any change in the deferment pro-
cedure would affect students on probation or those with low
scholastic averages primarily.
Present procedure in student deferment, calls for any student
pursuing a full-time course who is ordered for induction to receive
one deferment, class I-S, until the end of his academic year if he has
never been deferred before.
A STUDENT MAY receive only one such classification and this
only at the time he is ordered for induction.
After the I-S classification expires the student may request a
II-S student deferment if he meets the necessary scholastic re-
quirements or receives a sufficient grade on the, college qualifi-
cation test.
The II-S classification may be renewed at the discretion of the
student's local draft boards hinging on the student's scholastic stand-
ing, test score, or manpower needs of the draft board.
FOR STUDENT
TEMPTING, GOOD SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
TRYREPAIRED
T RY
ANGELO'S LUNCH
formerly Rainbow Waffle Shop SOLD
1100 CATHERINE
OPEN 7:00 A.M. - 8:00 P.M. Fountain Pens repaired by
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CLOSED MONDAYS Webster-Chicago
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-Daily-Lon Qui
SUSPENSE A LA SUSPENSION
DAILY OFFICIAL ~BULLETIN

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Women's Golf
Clinic To Open
Approach shots and putting will
be discussed for the first of three
golf clinics sponsored by the Wo-
men's physical education depart-
ment to be held from 7 to 8 p.m.
tomorrow at Palmer Field.
Golf clubs will be available at
the Women's. Athletic Bldg.
Other clinics on the agenda for
the summer session include one on
uphill and downhill shots July 15
and a second on the use of long
irons and woods July 22.
A beginning golf class for wo-
men has been added to the slate
of summer recreational classes.
Meeting regularly at 3:30 p.m.
Mondays and Wednesdays, classes
will start tomorrow.

(Continued from page 2)
Events Today
Square Dance at Lane HaU, 7:30-10:00
p.m. Everyone welcome.
Lydia Mendeissohn Box Office is open
from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. today. Tick-
ets for individual performances of the
Department of Speech summer play
series are available: Knickerbocker Hol-
iday and The Tales of Hoffman, $1.50-
$1.20-90 cents; The Country Girl and
Pygmalion, $1.20-90 cents-60 cents.
Director Sales
Start Tomorrow
Summer Session Student Direc-
tory sales will begin tomorrow at
book stores as well as five other
locations on campus.
Directory listings include the
names of all students and visiting
faculty on campus, their local ad-
dresses and phone numbers and
their home address.
Price of the directory has been
set at fifty cents.

Coming Events
Knickerbocker Holiday, the hilarious
musical comedy by Maxwell Anderson
and Kurt Weill, opens tomorrow night
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre at
8 p.m.
Summer Session French Club. Meet-
ing on Thursdiay, July 9, at 8:00 p.m. in
the Michigan League Professor Benja-
min F. Bart, of the Romance Language
Department, will speak on 'Un hiver
en France." French songs, games and a
social hour. All students and Faculty
members interested are cordially invit-
ed.
La p'tite causette meets Wednesday
from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. in the wing of
the north room of the Michigan Union
cafeteria. All students and Faculty
members wishing to speak or to learn
to speak French in a friendly atmos-
phere are cordially invited.

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things.
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The index of good quality table-a ratio of high sugar to low nicotine

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But when it's on sale at a sensational prce like
this, the rules say,
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Smtart styles for wear this summer and all year.
In lovely pastels and navy. Not every style in
every color and size, of course. They'll go like

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