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July 01, 1953 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1953-07-01

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41

TWO

- THE MICHIGAN D1AILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 1953

Vriters Convene Today,
)iscussPoetry,Fiction

Professor Says Women
Important in Greek Plays

4

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Well known writers will be on,
hand today and tomorrow to dis-;
,uss various aspects of writing
from poetry to detective ficion as
part of the Symposium of Writing
sponsored by the English Depart-
ment.
In order to discover how it can
aid prospective writers to "find
themselves" the University is of-
fering a full program of lectures,
discussion groups, and clinical ses-
sions devoted to manuscript anal-
ysis.
SUCH WRITERS as Prof. John
Muehl and Prof. Allan Seager both
of the English department, Ken-
neth Millar and Leslie Frost will
offer their suggestions to young
writers.
According to Prof. Robert F.
Haugh of the English Depart-
ment, Chairmen of Committee,
the object of the symposium is
"to bring together writers for the
purpose of stimulating discus-
sion, forathe exchange ofrtech-
nliques and methods for the
communication of enthusiasm
and the sharing of experiences"
The first item on the agenda
today will be registration and cof-
fee hour a 9:30 a.m. in Rm. 1006
Angell Hall followed by an open-
ing greeting by Prof. Arno Bader,
Chairman of the Hopwood Com-
mittee.
AT 10:30 a.m. the Sy'nposium
will hear its first lecturer, Prof.
Mueh who will speak on writing
non-fiction.
Prof. Allan Seager of the Eng-
lish Department will be the
luncheon speaker at 12:15 p.m.
at the Union. He will discuss
"The Writer as Thinker." There
will be a charge of $1.75 to at-
tend the luncheon.
A manuscript session on fiction
Hidden Radio
JazzesSleep
ELGIN, Ill.-(P)-Ralph D. Cla-
born went to bed at midnight. But
not to sleep.
Somewhere in the dark of night
a radio was emitting music and
long commercials.
At 4:20 a.m. yesterday Claborn
rose and telephoned a complaint
to the police.
Policemen drove over to the
neighborhood; turned off the
motor of their squad car and lis-
tened. They heard nothing but
the stirrings of early birds. So they
went away.
At 5:20 Claborn rang up the po-
lice again.
"Can't something be done about
that radio?" he pleaded. "It's still
going."
The two officers drove to Cla-
born's home, investigated, and
?again heard nothing.
"Wait until. I put on my trou-
sers and slippers," Claborn said,
"and I will help you find it."
As Claborn reached down for
his slippers, the music seemed
louder.
He looked underneath his bed.
There, still giving out with tunes
sweet and hot, was a portable
radio that belongs to Claborn's
two children.

will follow in the afternoon at
2:30 p.m.
* * +
"THE SOCIAL Meanings of the
Detective Novel" as derived by'
Kenneth Millar will be the last'
item on today's agenda at 4:15
p.m. in Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
Tomorrow, Kenneth Millar
will again speak "On Writing
Popular Fiction" at 9:30 a.m. in
the Hopwood room. Following
him at 11 a.m. will be a manu-
script session on poetry.
Because acquainting the writers
with the University facilities is
another important objective of
the symposium, members have
been invited to hear talks by Col-
ton Storm of the Library and by
F. Clever Bald of the Michigan
Historical Collection at 2 p.m. to-
morrow in the William Clements
Library.
The final event in the Writing
Symposium will be a talk by Les-
lie Frost, daughter of poet Robert
Frost. Miss Frost will speak on
"Modern Poetry Looks at the Mo-
dern World" at 4:15 p.m. in Audi-
torium A, Angell Hall.
June Exits
In Hot Finale
By The Associated Press
Summer turned on the steam
heat in much of the nation yes-
terday.
Temperatures of 90-plus were
recorded at many points. It was
humid, too, in a long hot belt that
extended from California through
the Southwest and Midwest and
reached into the East.
* * *
READINGS were in the 80s and
low 90s in the East, topped 90 in
St. Louis, Chicago, Milwaukee,
Omaha, Denver and Indianapolis
and were over the 100 mark in
Blythe, Calif., and Tucson, Ariz.
Phoenix, Ariz., had 109 and
LaJunta, Co., 101.
June, a hot month in many
areas, ended with a final blast of
heat.
** * *
MAYOR ALEX Clark of Indian-
apolis senk an order over the po-
lice radio to all uniformed cops
to remove their neckties and un-
button the top buttons on their
shirts.
It has been the most torrid
June on record in most Texas
cities. Dallas, for example, had
14 days of 100 or higher maxi-
mums during the month. It us-
ually has 11 such cverheated
days in an entire year.
Rains in the eastern half of
Texas have moderated tempera-
tures a bit.
* * *
BUT THE showers did not put
an end to concern over the drought
in Texas and other states in the
arid area.
The best rains in several months
were reported in some sections of
Western Oklahoma yesterday. The
fall amounted to more than an
inch at several points. It was not
a drought-breaker but farmers
were elated by the lift the mois-
ture gave the dying crops.

By ELSIE KUFFLER
"It is striking what a large partt
women play in Greek tragedy,"1
prefaced Robert S. C. Levens, Pro-
fessor of Classics at Oxford Uni-
versity yesterday in speaking of;
Women of Greek Tragedy."
Prof. Levens went on to say that
the Greek tragedians only had two
outstanding male characters with
women dominating the scene al-
most entirely contrasted to Shake-
speare who characterized very few
women.
ACCORDING TO Prof. Levens
this is even the more surprising
because the women of Athens in
5 B. C. were "in a position of
social inferiority," and there were
no women on the stage.
The reason for this peculiar-
ity explained Prof. Levens was
the fact that Greek tragedians
based their plots on Homeric
epics and others of the Homeric
period in which women were
not so secluded.
In the Homeric age of royalty
and warfare "Women had a great
deal at stake, and they were the
great sufferers," he said. "This
had the effect of making their per-
sonal relationships a matter of
great intensity," thus enabling
such playwrights as Euripedes and
Aeschylus to create moving and
emotional characters like Cas-
sandra, Clytemnestra, and Medea.
ONE REASON for depicting wo-
men so prolificly in plays, was
that, "The dramatists realized wo-
man's emotional strength, her ten-
acity of purpose, her authority,
and her ability to make a grown
man feel like a little boy."
To ilustrate some of her hus-
band's points and to give the
audience a very real experience,
Daphne Levens gave dramatic
readings from "Agememnon" by
Aeschylus portraying both Cas-
sandra and Clyemnestra.
She also read selections from the
"Trojan Women" by Euripedes and
from "Medea" by Sophocles. The
EventsToday
"FOURIER Transformation and
X-Ray Diffraction of Crystals"
will be discussed by P. P. Ewald
of the Brooklyn Polytechnic In-
stitute at 9 a.m. in 1400 Chemistry
Bldg.
Following this there will be a
lecture on the "Experimental
Studies of Crystal Structures" giv-
en by William N. Lipscomb of the
University of Minnesota at 10 a.m.
* s -
PROF. WILLIAM P. Halstead,
professor of speech will lecture on
"Through Europe by Stage" be-
fore the speech assembly at 3 p.m.
today in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater.
" e ese
"GALAXIES: Their Composition
and Structure" will be discussed
by Walter Baade, astronomer,
Mount Wilson and Palomar obser-
vatories at 2 p.m. in 1400 Chem-
istry Bldg. He will be followed by
Dr. George Gamow of George
Washington University who will
discuss Evolution of Stars and
Galaxies" at 3 p.m.
* * *
PROF. T. C. Rosenbloom of the
University of Minnesota will dis-
cuss "A Mathematical Approach
to Syntax" before the Linguistics
Luncheon Meeting at 1 p.m. in
the League dining room.

Medea monologue was given in the
original Greek after which Prof.
Levens jokingly pronounced that
it is possible to learn Greek in one
year as Mrs. Levens had only be-
gun its study last September.
State .Deficit
55 Million
For 1952-3
LANSING - (IP) - Michigan's
state deficit for the 1952-53 fiscal
year yesterday was estimated at
$55,000,000.
Fiscal officials said, however,
that it would be at least two
months before they determined ex-
actly how much the state is in the
red.
The state treasury and auditor
general's departments said the
state books would be kept open
for another 30 days until all bills
and revenue collections are in-
cluded. They said another 30 days
would be required to complete an
accounting of the fiscal year end-
ing yesterday.
The $55,000,000 estimate was
reached by subtracting additional
revenue obtained in the past two
months from the $90,000,000 pre-
dicted deficit which faced the leg-
islature- this year.
The largest revenue item was
the $35,000,000 supposed to be ob-
tained by shifting the due date of
the corporation franchise tax from
August to May. Officials said this
shift has not yet produced all the
revenue that was expected but
that part of the loss was offset by
incrpased sales tax collections.

Zabin

Leaves

To Report Home
NEW YORK-- (AP) --Georgi N.
Zarubin, Soviet ambassador to the
United States, left by plane yes-
terday for Russia "to report to
my ministry."
He was the second Soviet en-
voy to the West to leave for Mos-
cow yesterday. Jacob Malik, the
Kremlin's ambassador to Great
Britain, left London by air for
talks in Moscow.
Zarubi'n was asked before he
left here if his trip stemmed from
a sudden decision.
"No, rio, no," he replied.
NA TO Schedules
Air War Games
FONTAINBLEAU, France -()
-Some 1,800 Allied airplanes will
engage in air war games over
Western Europe during the last
nine days in July.
All types of warplanes from
nine of the 14 NATO nations will
take part in the exercises.
Regular air forces from Bel-
gium, Canada, France, The Neth-
erlands, the United Kingdom and
the United States will be joined
by those from Greece, Portugal
and Italy.
The games are aimed at exer-
cising Allied air forces in both
tactical and defense roles and,
also the national air defense sys-
tems of Belgium, France, The Ne-
therlands and Britain.

E
The Daily Official Bulletin Is a
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3510
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceeding publication (be-
fore 11 a.m. on Saturday).
WEDNESDAY, JULY 1. 1953
VOL. LXIII, No. 7S
Notices1
Saturday, July 4, is an official holiday.
Classes will be held as usual on Friday,
July 3.
There will be a short meeting of the
Graduate Student Council on Thurs-
day, July 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the West
Conference Room of Rackham Build-
ing.
There will be a meeting, Thursday,
July 2, at 5:00 p.m., in the undergrad-
uate office of the League for all girls
interested in working on publicity, dec-
orations, and refreshments committees
for Beach Ball, thesLeague's Big sum-
mer dance.
Veterans eligible for education bene-
fits under Public Law 550 (Korea G. I.
Bill) must report to Office of Veterans
Affairs, Room 555, Administration
Building before 5 p.m. July 6 if they
have not already done so. Failure to
check through that office may result
in receipt of no, or only partial allow-
ance for the Summer Session.
Waitresses: The Duck Lake Resort
near Albion, Michigan is seeking wait-
resses for summer resort employment.
Room, Board, $5 a day, plus tips is
renumeration. Call Lillian Wells, Tem-
ple 13548, Detroit, Michigan for further
information.
Teachers for Alaska: Various teaching
positions open in Palmer and Anchor-
age, Alaska for degree teachers, start-
ing in September, 1953. Call Bureau of
Appointments, University Extension 489
for further information.
Teachers for Presbyterian Church
Schools: The Board of National Mis-
sions of the Presbyterian Church in
the U.S.A. are seeking teachers in many
different fields for positions through-
outrtheUnited States and Alaska.
There are positions open In mission
schools, hospitals, health and Com-
munity centers, Jr. Colleges and other
organizations connected with the
Church. Call Bureau of Appointments,
University Extension 489 for further
information.
Lydia Mendessohn Box Office is
open from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. today.
Season tickets for the Department of
Speech summer play series are still
available at $6.00-$4.75-$3.25. Tickets
for the individual plays are also on
sale now at $1.20-90c-60c for the plays
and $1.50-$1.20-90c for the musical
comedy and opera. The Department of
Speech summer play series includes
The Madwoman of Chaillot, Knicker-
bocker Holiday, The Country Girl, Pyg-
malion and The Tales of Hoffman.
Come and take your ballroom lessons
at the League for the lowest cost pos-
sible. $2.50 for 6 lessons for men. Girls
admitted free. 7:00 p.m. Instructor Mrs.
Doris Martinak.
Test your skill against the experts by
participating in Duplicate Bridge to-
morrow night. Arrive promptly at 7:30
p.m. and a mere 5c per person for ad-
mission will be charged.
Student Organizations planning to be
active during the summer session are
reminded to register before July 3.
Forms for registration are available in
the Office of Student Affairs, 1020 Ad-
ministration Building. Use of the Daily
Official Bulletin for announcement of
meetings and use of meeting rooms in
University Buildings will be restricted
to officially recognized and registered
student organizations.
EMPLOYMENT REGISTRATION
A meeting will be held at 3:00 p.m.
today in Room 25 Angell Hal, for all
seniors and graduate students who are
interested in registering with the Bur-
eau of Appointments now for employ-
ment either after graduation, after mil-
itary service, or for future promotions
in any of the following fields: educa-
tion, business industry, technical, and
government. Registration material will
be given ot at the meeting.
Those students who have previously
registered with the Bureau of Appoint-
ments for employment and who are still
on campus are requested to contact the
Bureau as soon as possible at 3528 Ad-
ministration Building in order to bring

their records up to date. This action is
necessary for effective service.
REGISTRATION OF SOCIAL EVENTS
Social events sponsored by student
organizations at which both men and
women are to be present must be ap-
proved by the Dean of Students. Appli-
cation forms and a copy of regulations
governing these events may be secured
in the Office of Student Affairs, 1020
Administration Building. Requests for
approval must be submitted to that of-
fice no later than noon of the Mon-
day before the event is scheduled. A
list of approved social events will be
published in the Daily Official Bulletin
on Thursday of each week.
Exchange and Guest Dinners may be
held in organized student residences
(operating a dining room) between 5:30
p.m. - 8 p.m. for weekday dinners and
between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. for Sunday
dinners. These events must be an-
nounced to the Office of Student Af-
fairs at least one day in advance of
the scheduled date. Guest chaperons are
not required.
Calling Hours for Women in Men's
Residences. In University Men's Resi-
dence Hails, daily between 3 p.m. - 10:30
p.m.; Nelson International House, Fri-
day, 8 p.m.-12 p.m.; Saturday 2:30 p.m.-
5:30 p.m. and from 8 p.m.-12 p.m.; Sun-
day, 1 p.m.-10:30 p.m. This privilege ap-
plies only to casual calls and not to
planned parties.
(Continued on page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Men's gold wrist watch (Sante
Fe). Big reward. Call Detroit TR.
4-3538.
LOST on or near campus. Family heir-
loom sterling silver bracelet, 4 links.
1% inches wide. Flower and leaf de-
sign. Call Laurie Cumings, 2-0018.
Reward.
FOR SALE
'53 VOLKSWAGEN - German peoples'
car, $150 below cost. '48 English
Thames, small panel truck, $200 total.
Ph. European Products, 2-9780.
4x5 SYNCH. PRESS CAMERA - Flash
gun, case, cut film holders, coupled
range finder. Also 4x5 Solar enlarger,
F4.5 lens. Both like new. Must sacri-
fice. Phone 2-3245.
REFRIGERATOR, electric stove, 8mm
movie camera, shotgun. All in excel-
lent condition. Ph. 2-3245.
1952 CHEVROLET - Light green two-
door, perfect condition. Very clean.
Radio and heater. Complete service
record available. Best offer. Ph. 2-3246.
M to F (9 to 5).
PARAKEETS $6 and $8. Ganaries-fe-
males and undetermined sex $1.95.
Singers $7.95 and up. Mrs. Ruffins,
562 S. Seventh.
CUSHMAN MOTOR SCOOTER with side
car. New costs $465. Sale price $250.
1301 Prescott. 3-2740 (after 5).
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
FOR RENT
LARGE, COOL double rooms and one
single room available for male stu-
dents in house 5 minutes from cam-
pus. Ice box privileges. Call 3-0849.
DELUXE 2-room furnished apartment.
Private entrance, semi-private bath,
between Ypsi and Ann Arbor. No
children, 6 month lease. $67.50 per
month. Phone 2-9020.
HOME on Whitmore Lake for month of
August. Call Whitmore Lake 2835.
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS. Roomettes and Apartments by
day or week for campus visitors. -
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
liam. Phone 3-8454.
ROOM AND BOARD
MEALS FOR MEN-Good food. 1319 Hill.
Phone 2-6422
PERSONAL
SUMMER STUDENTS-Plan your own
course of piano lessons with fine pri-
vate teacher; brush-up series for ed-
ucation students; fundamentals for
beginners; repertoire and technique
for the advanced pianist. Ph. 2-3541.
Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
---V2 miles out Washte-
nw -- right on U.S. 23
for 1 mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10A.M. - 11 P.M.

RAD IOS - PHONOS
New and used and all guaranteed.
Phono needles - portable batteries.
We repair all types of radios, phonos,
and T. V.
Summer Special
Phono Jack and switch installed free
in your radio with purchase of V.M.
Triomatic Changer Attachment.
ANN ARBOR RADIO & TV
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
12 blockseast of East Eng. ,

HELP WANTED
STUDENT to wait tables for meals.
1319 Hill. 2-6422.
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.

BUSINESS SERVICES

'I

BUSINESS SERVICES

WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dryand wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
HOME TYPING SERVICF-Reasonable
rates. Call Mrs. Conner, 2-7605.
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED-Small ice chest for boat.
Contact: L. Connick, 217 N. Ingalls.
MISCELLANEOUS
COOL OFF by subscribing to several
of the 2002 periodicals we handle.
Phone Student Periodical, 6007.
ALTERATIONS ladies garments. Prompt
service. Ph. 2-2678 mornings if possible.

S

A FEATHER IN OUR HAT!
We're proud to present Greer Garson
in her new M-G-M picture
"SCAN DAL AT SCOURIE"
co-starring *Xalter Pidgeon. It's a
delightful marital comedy in
Technicolor with warmth and
good humor. You'll like it.
M-G-M
GREER C \'WALTER f V

I

"SCANDAL .
AT
*01" by
TECHNICOLOR
wth
AGNES MOOREHEAD
DONNA CORCORAN

r

Cinemna SL, qid4

SOc until 5 P.M.
Evenings 70c

NOW!O
Continuous from 6:30 P.M.
3 SHOWS NIGHTLY
Thursday - Friday - Saturday-
Complete Shows at 6:30, 8:00, 9:30 P.M.
FEATURE FIFTEEN MINUTES LATER
Sunday at 8:00 as usual
fil .1

Stay Cool and
Comfortable
-UPM

50e until 5 P.M.
Evenings 70e
Inc. Tax
__b NOW

Q

I

I-

At The Music Center. .

COLE PORTER'S

I

CA

-CA

I

C

THURSDAY and FRIDAY
At 6:30 - 8:00 - 9:30 P.M.
Continuous- Performances
MARLENE JAMES
DIETRICH STEWART
in JOE PASTERNAK'S Jaunty and Amusing Chronicle
"DE TRY
RIDES AGAIN"

Tr

Broadway's SMASH HIT MUSICAL on Records!
with the

.,;

ORIGINAL BROADWAY CAST

JACK CARSON - MISCHA AUER - CHARLES WINNINGER
BRIAN DONLEVY - UNA MERKEL - BILLY GILBERT
"Good fun every minute of it." - New York Times
EXTRA! TECHNICOLOR CARTOON
ALSO "THE LOON'S NECKLACE" IN COLOR
Coming SATURDAY and SUNDAY
J. ARTHUR RANK PRESENTS
"A PASSPORT

Here's the brilliant ORIGINAL CAST of CAN-CAN, singing Cole
Porter's saucy lyrics and lovely melodies . . bringing you all the
gaudy impertinence of yesterday's Parisian night life! Here are your
front-row seats to the exciting meeting of Broadway and Montmartre!
In the CAN-CAN score: 14 delightful songs including such popular
hits as
SC'EST MAGNIFIQUE
'oI AM IN LOVE
* IF YOU LOVED ME TRULY
" ALLEZ-YOUS-EN
* IT'S ALL RIGHT WITH ME
" I LOVE PARIS

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