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June 27, 1953 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-06-27

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r

PAGEr O T~

THE MICHIGAN DIAY'

ATURDAY, JUM 27, 1953

I

'CURING HAMS' AT SALINE:

-,- I

Union Service, Tradition
Influence Life on Campus

Soybean

ill Becomes

Theater
* . * *

* * *

* * *

* * *

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DINNER FOR A TROUPE OF ACTORS AND FRIEND

Group Plans
Experiments
With Staging
By GAYLE GREENE
Where George Washington Car-
ver once experimented with soy-
beans, a former University student
is "curing hams," readying them
for the first production of the Sa-
line Mill Theatre.
In an old five floor, wood panel-
led factory, once a soybean mill,
later a school house and a labor-
atory, the drama group has par-
titioned dormiories, offices, work-
shop and set up housekeeping. A
spacious warehouse behind the
mill has been converted into an
arena theater.
THE MILL located on Michigan
112, will be the scene of four co-
medies this summer in which the
director Warren Pickett will em-
ploy flexible staging, varying the
circle-in-the-round with conven-
tional semi-circular and diagonal
staging.
Bell, Book and Candle by
John Van Druten will open the
season July 3 and run through
July 18.
Pickett, who received his mas-
ters degree in theater from the
University, has imported a com-
pany of professional actors from
Detroit, several of them veterans
of Wayne University's Theater
and the Detroit World Theater.
"ARMS AND the Man," "The
Importance of Being Earnest" and
"Angel Street" are tentatively set
for later production.
Pickett expressed hopes that
interest from summer audiences
will warrant continuing activi-
ties this fall.
With only three of the five
floors of mill space devoted to of-
fices, workshop and dormitories,
he plans to build a Rathskepper
in the basement but has yet to
come up with any ideas for utiliz-
ing an odd assortment of machin-
ery lying around the grounds.
A large showcase overlooking
the highway, now displaying a
powerful generator will be used
for show displays.
EMPTY soybean storage rooms
would make an excellent apart-
ment, Picket mused, except there's
no ventilation, he added. One of
the actors suggested the genera-
tor might be converted to a cof-
fee machine.
While planning these rehabili-
tations, rehearsing for the first
production, installing lighting and
setting up canvas chairs, the
group takes time out to pose for
publicity stills, coach the blackcat
Piwacket for its role in "Bell,
Book and Candle" and ride up to
the dormitories on a precariously
creaky freight elevator.
Admission to the shows will be
by membership card or payment
of a guest fee at the door.
Opera Tryouts
Set for Monday
Tryouts will be held for the op-
era chorus of "Tales of Hoff-
mann" at 7 p.m. Monday in Rm.
214, Hill Auditorium.
This year's opera calls for a
large chorus to provide such char-
acterizations as tavern singers,

puppets and Venetian gondoliers.
No acting experience is neces-
sary. The opera is to be present-
ed Aug. 6, 7, 8 and 10 in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.

Steeped in more than 40 years
of tradition and service, the Mich-
igan Union has become an integral
part of campus life.
Built to provide a meeting place
for faculty, alumni and students,
and to furnish a University social
and recreational center, the Union
provides bowling alleys, pool and
ping pong tables, browsing library,
barber shop and swimming pool to
its members as well as guest rooms,
a dining room and a cafeteria to
alumni, faculty and students and
their guests, but not to the general
public.
* * *
THE UNION was the first orga-
nization to conduct a rooming
service and was instrumental in
initiating of an employment bu-
reau.
One of the long-standing tra-
ditions of the Union is that no
women can enter the Union by
the front door, but must use
Age of Universe
To l e Discussed
Prof. George Gamow of the
physics department of George
Washington University will speak
on "The Age of the Universe" at
2 p.m. Monday in Rm. 1400 Chem-
istry Bldg.
Part of a four-week symposium
on astrophysics, sponsored by the
physics department, the lecture is
open to the public.

the north entrance. This tradi-
tion was broken last yecr during
the panty-raid, but siace then
only occasionally by sone unin-
formed coed.
An annual event, begin in the
very earliest days of the Union is
the carving of a table ip in the
tap room by senior men. The tables
are then varnished and used or
else hung up on the wall. Michigan
football glories have thus been re-
corded for many years.
The Student Offices in the Un-
ion, which are not open this sum-
mer, sponsor more than fifty ac-
tivities a year. Men's orientation,
the guide service, free Union mov-
ies and weekly dances are carried
on under their auspices.
Awards Granted
To Four Students
The College of Architecture and
Design has awarded scholarships
to four students for the academic
year 1953-54.
Denis Charles Schmiedeke re-
ceived the Harley, Ellington and
Day Scholarship which provides
$1,000 for a different student each
year for five years, beginning in
1950.
Three students were presented
Arthur C. Tagge Scholarships .o
$325 each. They are Nancy J. Da-
vis, Gerald E. Harburn and Ralph
U. Price.

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-Photos by Chuck Ritz
THE CAT GETS IN THE ACT 7

SUMMER PLAYBILL:

Speech Department To Give
The 'Madwoman of Chaillot'

AND HERE'S MY BEST PROFILE

FI

Calendar of Events

TODAY-
The International Center will
hold a welcome reception for sum-
mer foreign students and visiting
faculty at 8 p.m. in the Rackham
Assembly Hall and Terrace.
Receiving guests informally will
be Esson M. Gale, Director of the
International Center, Prof. Har-
old M. Dorr, Director of the Sum-
iner Session and members of the
International Center Board of
Governors.
Seven Sinners, second of this
week's Cinema Guild films starts
at 7 p.m. in the Architecture Au-
ditorium.
With a later showing at 9 p.m.
and a Sunday showing at 8 p.m.,
the movie will conclude the first
week of the Cinema Guild's new
policy of showing two movies a
week.
MONDAY-
First film in the summer sym-
posium on Popular Arts will be
shown at 7:30 p.m. in Auditorium
A, Angell Hall.
Among a series of seven week-
ly free public showings, the De-
velopment of the Narrative will
include "Washday Troubles," "A
Trip to the Moon," "The Great
Train Robbery," "Possibilities of
a War in the Air" and "Queen
Elizabeth."
There will be a symposium on
X-Ray Diffraction at 9 p.m. in
Rm. 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
P. P. Ewald, of the Brooklyn
Polytechnic Institute will discuss
" Fourier Transformation and X-
Ray Diffraction of Crystals" fol-
lowed by William N. Lipscomb of
the University of Minnesota who
will lecture on "Experimental
Studies of Crystal Structures."
The Conference of American
and Canadian Slavicists will

meet at 9:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. In
the East Conference Rm. of the
Rackham Bldg.
* * *
"Plato and Aristotle as Critics
of Poetry and Drama" will be dis-
cussed by Prof. Robert S. C. Lev-
ens of Merton College, Oxford
University at 4:15 p.m. in Audi-
torium A, Angell Hall.
Under the auspices of the De-
partment of Speech and Classical
Studies, the talk will be the first
of a two-part lecture series given
by Prof. Levens.
The second, concerning "Women
of Greek Tragedy," is scheduled
for Tuesday.
* * *
James Berry, Grad., will present
a piano recital at 8:30 p.m. in
Rackham Assembly Hall.
* * *

Gardenias
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - (JP) -
The attorney for Francis M.
Hines, 44 years old, passed out
gardenias to the judge and jury
Thursday and Hines was ac-
quitted of drunken driving
charges.
Hines, a florist, was booked
for operating his car under the
influence of alcohol May 30
after his auto, loaded with
gardenias, was involved in a
highway accident in Somer-
ville.
His attorney brought a doz-
en gardenias into Middlesex
Superior Court, and asked
Judge Paul G. Kirk and jury
to smell them.
"Notice how much they smell
like alcohol," he suggested.
The jury found Hines inno-
cent.
Gas Committees
To Meet Monday
LANSING-(I)-The Michigan
legislative committee probing gas-
oline prices has a date to meet the
congressional committee on the
same subject in Washington Mon-
day morning.
At an emergency meeting of the
state committee yesterday, chair-
man William S. Broomfield (R-
Royal Oak) completed arrange-
ments for the Washington trip.
Broomfield said he will ask the
congressional committee to hold
a joint hearing with his group,
probably in Detroit, where, he
said, gasoline prices are the high-
est of any of the nation's top 10
cities.

Drama Critics' Award winner,
"The Madwoman of Chaillot," is
scheduled to be the first presenta-
tion of the speech depart-
ment's Summer Playbill will open
Wednesday.
Featuring Prof. Clarabel Baird
of the speech department ih the
title role, the play concerns an ec-
centric countess who mingles with.
the riff-raff of the Paris streets.
* * *
DISCOVERING a plan whereby
she can save all humanity in one
afternoon by sending the rogues
and knaves of that city marching
through a secret door into obliv-
ion, the "madwoman" successfully
eliminates evil in the world.
Also featured in the play are
Bette Ellis, Grad., Gwen Arner, '54,
Lois Banzet, Grad., Joel Sebastian,
'54, and William Taylor.
"The Madwoman" is directed
by Prof. Valintine Windt of the
speech department.
The drama has been adapated
from its original French by Mau-
rice Valency.
One of a series of three plays, a
musical comedy and an opera
League Summer
Dances To Open
The first of this summer's series
of Saturday night League all-
campus dances will be held from 9
to 12 p.m. today in the League Ball
room, with Al Townsend and his
orchestra providing the music.
Townsend, who led a 14 piece
band here in 1946 and 47, has also
played for Henry Bussy and Gene
Krupa. The band leader, who did
full-scale arrangements for Kru-
pa will also be playing his own
arrangements at the League this
summer.
Admittance to the dances,
which are informal and either
stag or drag, will be $.50 per per-
son and $1.00 per couple.
State Bills Signed
LANSING-VP)-Gov. Williams
today signed appropriation bills
totaling more than $395,000,000
leaving only two money bills on
his desk for action by Saturday's
deadline.
The measures signed today in-
cluded $7,720,187 for construction
at state instituions and colleges.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 AM.: Informal Discussion Group, Pine
Room, Topic, "The Christian Student and the
World Struggle"'
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship, "The Key to
Christian Prayer," Dr. Large preaching.
3 :00 P.M.: Student group meet in Wesley
Lounge for picnic meeting at Wampler Lake.
Swimming, volley-ball and picnic lunch. All
students welcome.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation rooms, open daily.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: "God's Strange Work."
7:30 P.M.: "Give Ye Them To Eat."
Wednesday 8:00: Prayer Meeting.
A Friendly Church where the Word is preached.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
William S. Baker, University Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00: Henry Kuizenga
preaching, "World Perspective."
Sunday Evening 5:30: Picnic Supper followed by
discussion of "The Christian Imperative Ex-
pressed through Church Music" led by Prof.
James Wallace.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
North Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Commentary.
9:50 A.M.: Student Breakfast, Lounge of Parish
House.
11:00A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
6:30 P.M.: University Students' Program, Lounge
of Parish House.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evensong. In the Chapel.
During the Week:
Monday (St. Peter's Day) 7:00 A.M.:
Holy Communion.
Wednesday 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
Friday 12:10 P.M.: Holy Communion.
4:00 to 6:00 P.M.: Tea in the ,lounge of the
Parish House.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service, Sermon by Rev.
Press, "The Church at Work."

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
June 28-Christian Science.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from.11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M.: Bible Class.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service.
Sermon by Dr. Yoder.
7:00 P.M': Meeting-Dr. George Mendelholl,
speaker. "What is the Value of the Old Testa-
ment?"
Tuesday, 7:30 P.M.: Seminar-"World's Greatest
Literature." This week: Book of Job.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service with Holy Communion.
Sermon by the pastor, "As Ambitious, Yet
Contented," first in the summer session series
on "Paradoxes in Christianity."
Sunday at 6:00: Suoper-Program, with talk by
Air Force Chaplain Theodore Kleinhans, 30th
Air Division, Willow Run, on "The Challenge
of the Chaplaincy."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Sunday at 8:00 P.M.: The Adult-Student Discus-
sion Group presents the first in a series of six
discussions on the Bible, to be led by Leroy
Waterman, Professor Emeritus of Semitics and
formerly on the Editorial Board of the Revised
Standard Version. Topic for the first discussion:
the Book of Amos. Refreshments will be served.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 AM.
Sunday at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Basement of Chapel.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director

.

scheduled by the speech depart-
ment for its summer season, the
play will run until July 4.
Season tickets for the entire
summer season are on sale daily
at the Lydia Mendelssohn box-
office. Theyare priced at $6.00,
$4.75 and $3.25.
Tickets for individual perform-
ances of "The ?madwoman of
Chaillot" will go on sale Monday.
They are priced at $1.20, 90 cents
and 60 cents.

t

Everyone Welcome
to a
BIG PICNIC TODAY
at the Island
FUN * GAMES * FOOD * FIRESIDE FELLOWSHIP
Meet at LANE HALL at 5:30 P.M.
Sponsored by Michigan Christian Fellowship
(Chapter of Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship)

;:
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TUESDAY-
The summer season of face
recitals will open at 8:30 p.m
Rackham Lecture Hall, w
Prof. Emil Raab, violinist,o
Prof. Benning Dexter, pianist,
present a program of sonatas
violin and piano.

ulty
. in
hen
and
will
for

A(

Dean Goes East
Dean E. Blythe Stason of the
Law School will take part in a
pre-trial conference before an ex-
aminer of the Federal Communi-
cations Commission Monday in
Washington, D.C.
The American Bar Association
and the FCC Bar are putting on
the demonstration through the
Section on Administrative Law of
which Dean Stason is chairman
of the program committee.

11 - I * * * * * * * * * -11

BANK BY MAIL
You can avoid Summer heat and

conjestion by utilizing our

"Bank By

r

Mail" system.
so easy to use.

It's completely safe and

The Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill Street
invites you to its

Come in and inquire

about the

I1 many advantages atI

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