100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 08, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-08-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGUST S,1953

Who's Whose Best Friend

A HOT DAY, A HOSE, A DOG, AND A CHARITABLE
YOUNGSTER ALL COMBINED TO PROVIDE THIS
CHARACTERISTIC SUMMER PHOTO

LOOK and LISTEN
With DONALD HARRIS

\ mi'

Gertrude Stein's first printed
book of stories, "Three Lives," has
been chosen by William G. Rogers,
literary editor of the Associated
Press, for discussion on CBS Ra-
dio's - "Invitation to Learning,"
11:35 a.m. tomorrow.
Prof. Lewis Leary of Columbia
Three Student
C
Concerts Set
Three students will give con-
certs tomorrow and Monday.
Edward Skidmore, Grad., will
present a Double Bass recital at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Auditorium
A, Angell Hall.
Skidmore will be Assisted by Wil-
bur Perry, pianist, Nathalie Dale,.
violinist, David Ireland, violist, and
David Baumgartner, violincellist.
The program includes works of
Marcello, Hindemith, and the
Quintet in A major, Op. 114,
"Trout" of Schubert.
MARY ANN SMELTZER will
present a piano recital at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in Auditorium A,
Angell Hall.
Miss Smeltzer will play works
of Scarlatti, Copland, Bach, and
Beethoven. Admission is open to
the public without charge.
* * s
J, RUPERT NEARY, Grad., will
present a clarinet recital at 8:30
p.m. Monday in Rackham Assem-
bly Hall.
Neary will be assisted by Carol
Van.Asselt, pianist and James Hel-
ler, violinist. The program includes
works of Mozart, Bozza, A. Longue,
Jeanjean, Strawinsky, and Mason.
Admission is open to the public
without charge.

University will join Rogers in the
discussion. Rogers is the author
of "When This You See" a memoir
of Gertrude Stein.
* * *
GREGOR Piatigorsky will be
cello soloist and Joseph de Pas-
quale viola soloist in Richard
Strauss' "Don Quixote" with the
Boston Symphony Orchestra con-
ducted by Charles Munch, in a
broadcast from the Berkshire Fes-
tival at Tanglewood, Mass., on CBS.
Radio's "World Music Festivals,"
at 2:30 p.m. tomorrow.
Sir Cedric Hardwicke and Di-
ana Lynn co-star in "Best Sell-
er" on "G.E. Theater" at 8:00
p.m. tomorrow on CBS Televis-
ion.
"Best Seller" is the story of an
English novelist who is brought
to this country by his publisher for
a personal appearance tour to ex-
plain his philosophy, which is even-
tually changed when he meets aj
beautiful blond. .
TRUE D. MORSE, Under-Secre-
tary of Agriculture, will be "Man
of the Week" on the CBS Tele-
vision public appairs program, 4:30
p.m. tomorrow.
Three orchestral programs from
the eighth annual Brevard Music
Festival, held at the Transylvania
Music Camp at Brevard, N. C. will
be heard on CBS Radio at 4:30
p.m. Saturdays, Aug. 15, 22, and
29.
On Aug. 15 the American violin-
ist Joseph Fuchs will be soloist in
the first movement of the Brahms
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra
in D major. James Christian Pfohl
will conduct the festival orches-
tra in Beethoven's Egmont Over-
ture and a selection from Handel's
Water Music.

Study Palsy
At Summer
Workshop
Speech therapists are being
trained in the care and treatment
of cerebral palsied children at the
Speech Clinic in what is consid-
ered a pioneer venture in the field.
The program is intended pri-
marily for speech therapists who
presently devote their time to
cerebral palsied children or who
expect to specialize in CP work.
THE ANN ARBOR program has
lead to the expected establishment
of such clinics in three or four key
Michigan cities in the fall and
winter. These clinics will be for
the benefit of'parents and profes-I
sional therapists, as well as medi-
cal men and public health workers
in general.
The local project has been a
cooperative -undertaking of the
University and the United Cere-
bral Palsy Association of Michi-
gan, Inc. The latter has pro-
vided funds for five speech ther-
apists in the training 'program,
while ten additional students
presently enrolled in speech
courses are also participating.
Special scholarships provided by
UCPA pay the tuition fees and
living costs for those attending
the course. Additional funds are
made available by UCPA for lec-
turers brought to Ann Arbor for
the program.
The program is under the direc-
tion of Prof. D. E. Morley of the
speech department.
* * *
THE CURRICULA of the train-
ing course has included Anatomy
and Function of the Vocal Appa-
ratus, with 4 credit hours; Speech
and Language Therapy for Dys-
phasics, 2 credit hours; and a
Seminar in Speech Therapy for
the Cerebral Palsied, 2 credit
hours.
The anatomy course has been
given at the Medical School five
days a week, with emphasis on
acquainting the students with
the detailed anatomy of t'he or-
gans used in producing speech.
Lecturers, recitations and sup-
ervised disection of the human
cadaver have been included.
The dysphasia course has been
given at the Speech Clinic four
days a week. It has emphasized
the present objectives and meth-
ods of treatment in dysphasia and
has given an opportunity for ob-
servation and participation in
therapy work with parents in the
Speech Clinic's Dysphasia Divi-
sion.
The seminar in speech therapy
also has been conducted at the
Speech Clinic, with occasional field
trips, including a number to Rack-
ham School in Ypsilanti, where
the therapists have had an op-
portunity to work directly with
cerebral palsied children.
The summer program will con-
clude on August 15. The proposed
statewide program for the fall and
winter will include a panel of fore-
most professional staff executives
at the University.

By ROBERT HEWETT
(Editor's Note: The young Repub-
lie of Indonesia has been without a
government since June 3 when Com-
munists joined with the Nationalist
party in Parliament to bring about
the downfall of Premier Wilopo's cab-
inet. AP Correspondent Robert Hewett
tells in the following story the diffi-
culties Indonesia is running into
three and a half years after winning
independence from Holland.)
JAKARTA - (P) - The train
chugged slowly through the moun-
tains of West Java, past terraced
rice fields and tea plantations amid
the most beautiful scenery in the
world.
Abruptly, the stillness was ripped
by the ugly rattle of machinegun
fire. Little, brown-uniformed men
charged from ambush as the train
lurched to a stop before a crude
barricade.
A few Indonesian ai'my soldiers
in the train tried vainly to fight off
the attack. Passengers who re-
sisted were shot. When the raiders
withdrew after looting the train,
the toll was 9 killed, 37 wounded.
FANATICAL Darul Islam troops,
fighting to establish a strictly
theocratic Moslem state in newly-
independent Indonesia. had struck
again.
For four years Darul Islam's
disciplined army of about 5,000
armed men-supported by thous-
ands of followers-had virtually
ruled West Java. Led by a fiery
46-year-old Moslem, Katosuwir-
jo, Darul Islam has fought 40,000
Indonesian army troops by hit-
and-run raids and run its own
"government" in an area roughly
150 miles long and 40 miles wide,
not far from the capital of Jak-
arta. Last year Darul Islam was
responsible for an estimated
2,000 deaths and loss of more
than $12,000,000 in burned vil-
lages, looted estates and attacks
on rail and road transport.
A few days after the attack de-
I scribed, 15,000 demonstrators in
Jakarta demanded more drastic
action against Darul Islam.
They demonstrated also the
growing power of the numerically-
small Communist party. In the last
year the Communists have exploit-
ed economic and political unrest
and, working through Red China's
embassy, have outdone all other
parties in propaganda.
ELSEWHERE in the capital,
rival party leaders in the badly-
split Parliament were trying to
patch together their fifth govern-
ment since independence was won
from the Dutch three and a half
years ago.
The Darul Islam attacks, Com-
munist agitation, the jockeying
for power in a Parliament which
has never faced an election-
these are the growing pains of
the largest, and potentially the
richest, nation in South East
Asia.
The Japanese invasion smashed
forever the facade of "western
white superiority" built up in 300
years of Dutch rule over Indo-
nesia's'"0,000,000 brown skinned

people. In 1945, a rag-tag but de-
termined nationalistic army pro-
claimed independence for the 18.-
000 islands scattered across the
tropical South Seas.
Four years of on-again, off-
again revolutionary war followed
until the Dutch, under pressure
from the United Nations, trans-
ferred sovereignty to the Indon-
esian Republic on Dec. 27, 1949.
TODAY INDONESIA'S dreams
of prosperity and happiness under
independence are being frustrated
by fanatical Moslem guerrilla war-
fare and clever maneuvering by
Moscow-trained Communists.
Caught in the middle are su-
per-nationalistic politicians who
duck responsibility and flirt with
both extreme right and left in a
dangerous game for political ad-
vantage.
It's a gloomy situation disturb-
ing to foreign friends (both Asian
and Western) and is drawing in-
creasing criticism from any re-
sponsible Indonesians.
Don't get the idea that the new
nation is in chaos. It isn't.
TOURISTS ARE still drawn to
the isle of Bali to watch the sa-
rong-clad dancers. Happy-go-
lucky Indonesians still tap their
rubber trees, sail their little fish-
ing boats, plow their rice fields.
Earnest young students are go-
ing in increasing numbers to
schools and colleges, trying to
catch up on the desperate need
for doctorsengineers, farm spec-
ialists and technicians in dozens of
fields.
In Jakarta the night-time cur-
few was lifted recently for the
first time in 11 years. Security
in many parts of the island na-
tion is back to normal.
But economically, Indonesia is
limping along. Insecurity is only
partly responsible for such condi-
tions as a 99 per cent drop in sugar
production, 44 per cent in tea. The
more responsible political leaders
are exhorting the people to work
harder and drop the idea that
"freedom from the Dutch means
freedom from toil."
POLITICALLY, the chornic in-
stability of government was re-
flected by the resignation on June
3 of the coalition cabinet headed
by Dr. Wilopo, a leader of the Na-
tionalist party.
The cabinet's downfall was
engineered by Wilopo's own Na-
tionalist party with the enthus-
iastic support of the 16 Com-
munist members of Parliament.
No single party controls the 210-
man Parliament and the Com-
munist bloc holds the balance
of power.
Indonesia's Parliament, split up
among 18 or 19 parties, resembles
in many ways the French National
Assembly - with the difference
that parliamentary elections have
never been held in Indonesia. Thus
the parties themselves are often
split and there is little party soli-
darity or responsibility.

(Continued from Page 2)
Concerts
Student Recital: Edward Skidmore,
student of double bass with Clyde
Thompson, will present a recital in
partial fulfillment of the requirements
for the Master of Music at 8:30 Sunday
evening, August 9, in Auditorium A,
Angell Hall. He will be assisted by Wil-
bur Perry, piano, Nathalie Dale, violin,
David Ireland, viola, and David Baum-
gartner, cello, in a program of works by'
Marcello, Hindemith and Schubert.
The general public is invited.
Student Recital: J. Rupert Neary,
clarinetist, with Carol Van Asselt, pi-
anist, and James Heller, violinist, will
present a recital in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree of
Master ofgMusic at 8:30, Monday eve-
ning, August 10, 'in the Rackham As-
sembly Hall. It will include the works
of Mozart, Bozza, A. Longue, Jeanjean,
Strawinsky and Daniel Gregory Mason.
His recital will be open to the public
without charge.

Moslems, RdsDisrupt
Young Indonesian Land'l

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

r
.o
a ...... ................_................ ..............
....... z M ,...... ............. ....................-.................... ...............,............................................. ....... .:.: ... .........:.: ... ..... ..
......................... ................Y *.. ..... ... ..... . .... .............................................. .......................-.................................................. :::
Q ..:...: ' ::::: ... ......:...................................................................................................................
................... c>._..... ,... " D JA K A R T A ..:,.,. .........................................................,..............,......................................................................... .......,......................
......................................................................................... ..................................
tl ay ..........................................................
B O G O R ..r .,,, / P U R W A K A R T A ::::::::.::.::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::...::: ::::::::":::,.. ......
asasa:ataa::;ttssata::aa::at::::: a:aasast:asa:° ;::aa:asasasat:....
,. .u, T J IR EB 4 N ...:........:.....:......................................._:....;.....:...:.... PA II W " J E
................... PEKAtONGAN ITT:
BANDUNG , BLORA> TUBAN
:" :::::::::::::aa t:aaaaa:aa
°UCiCABUMI ALaNG"" 1 ADt1RA
...... S R G OADoNE
«. ........................ ". E M A A N G R
.........................................
;s BANGKALA
..................................................................... AE
A A PAMEiCASAN
. ..................................................................... " a . t S U R AB AJA
........................................................
.................. GENTENG w
,..: ::....::......:............:...........::......:...:.................. T i A JA S r '
:::::::::::::
.................::":"::::::::;::-;::;:::::: :.:::::-_.- M AG ELANG .,SURAK RTA 1al i
.... ,n
PASURUAN
G _.. .... Pr_:
":::::::':" :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::-::::::::"-::':::::::::::;:::'::::::::::::::"::::::::::::::::::::::::'::::'::::::::.:::::::::::::::. :ata:ataat::;:.:::::... , O N O O G K O lR l e ,,, ,. " , ,
...........................................................
OJOKJAKA Ate,;
a
R E S . A
iEcci , IN
...... .. .- " V
;.MAEATA TULUNGAGUNG
f ,
" n~u"
::::; o ::.:: ::::::::::::::::aria:aaa¢saasatasaatatta:ataatta:aaaaa;atsa aaatatstaraaattaataaaattasa:asas a°:::.. ,. LU MA D JANG n
.............:............... PA T.iIIA N --,. ± i >
'CEtEB£5 ""a"" ,
" . ataattaasa:aaas: as tattsa:aaa aa; a:at::a:::::.a : :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::" .
...-: ,;c9rs :::. ::..::::: ..................:.:.................::.....:.:...::.:..::.::: :.: ......:::...:.
" :.-:.
........ .. ::.: ::::a :::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;-:.":::::::: ::::::::::":::::::-:::::::...:::::::::::. .;,;cS A N JU W A N G I
r N EW .... .:aaa;t::attta : :" :::::::::::::: :::::::::::::.. _... .. ......._..................,.............. :...
: asaataaaa :a:aa
U M A : :: " :a:ataaa:aaa :' :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::::.:::::::::::"::::::::::::::':::":'.. _ .:::::
r l A .............. ..............o ..c A ...:..........:::..:::..:..::.:::::::::::..: ::::::: ,
" ............ .................................:.......................:. :......... ................. .t.................. ...................., s.. "rs
yrs. y , ........................................................_.._........................................................................................... ..... _ ,
_ ....................................................................................................................................................:..
......................................................"............................,..,............,.,...................................................................... ?vi
a lit ,lea .r ) ARV iS. ...............:.................................................. ..........................._......,...._.............................................~.....-,...............................................,....................................................-..............«
..:.........:....:..:........................:...:..... :.:.:_:... ...........................................s.........,:.....,...;......:....:.:::::.::.::::::::r:::"::..::...:;.........
. . ....:........... ::r..o......°":f:.":z................ .......,......., .... ... .. __.. ::_ -
.. lSTRAt ...:....: ...:
~ N ' < :::::......:::::::::::::: o :.,,.... ..,....,.. . ... .............:......t.... T o0 s:: " ; A PO R sOX1M A TELA M C tJ.M
Iseatian f.7rea 3AVA ' '"al's"' :,' '' ' - .....: .._ M:JeW ...
- ::.:.:..... ..........................
Tom:

I

y
,,.*

Carillon Student Recital, Tuesday,
August 11, at 12 noon, by Lois Batche-
lor, Betsy Gidley, Fred Fahrner and
Richard Harper. The recital will include
Bach's, Prelude 1, from 8 short pre-
ludes and fugues, Children's Suite,
played by Lois Batchelor; Mozart's,
Minuet from Don Giovanni, Couperin's,
Andante, Folk Airs, played by Betsy
Gidley; Handel's, Sonata for a musical
clock, Fesch's, Tempo di gavotta e,
double di tempo, played by Richard
Harper; Price's Rhapsody for Two Car-
illonneurs, No. 4, First performance,
played by Lois Batchelor and Betsy
Gidley, Gow's Caller herrin', and
Price's. Victory Rhapsody for Large
Carillon, played by Fred Fahrner.
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Alumni Memorial
H~all. Popular Art in America (JTune 30
-August 7):
General Library. First Floor Corridor.
Incunabula: Books Printed in the Fif-
teenth Century.
Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Gill-
man Collection of Antiques of Palestine.
Museums Building, rotunda exhibit.
Steps in the preparation of ethnolo-
gical dioramas.,
Michigan Historical Collections. Mi-
chigan, year-round vacation land.
Clements Library. The good, the bad.
the popular.
Law Library. Elizabeth II and her em-
pire.

Architecture Building. Michigan Chil-
dren's Art Exhibition,
University High School. Childrens'
Books from Fifty Countries.
Events Today
Tonight in Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre, PROMPTLY AT 8:00 p.m., the
Department of Speech and School of
Music wil present Jacques Offenbach's
fantastic opera, The Tales of Hoff-
mann. Music direction is by Josef Blatt
with the stage direction by Valentine
Windt and the choreography by Betty
Pease. LATE COMERS WILL NOT BE
SEATED UNTIL AFTER THE PRO-
LOGUE.
SI, Cinema Guild Summer Program:
Humphrey Bogart, Sidney Greenstreet
in Dashiell Hammett's "The Maltese Fal-
con"-Cartoon: Disney's "Donald and
Pluto." Showings, 7 and 9 p.m. Archi-
tecture Auditorium,
Coming Events
Lutheran Student Association (Na-
tional Lutheran Council) Hill and For,.
est Ave. Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Bible lass;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Informal Meeting.
Sunday, August 9. SL Cinema Guild
Summer Program: Humphrey Bogart,
Sidney Greenstreet in Dashiell Ham-
mett's "The Maltese Falcon"--Cartoon:
Disney's "Donald and Pluto." 8:00 p.m.
|Architecture Auditorium.

, --
.-'

Q

..,

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL-
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "As Losing Life, Yet Finding It." (last
in summer series on "Paradoxes in Christianity)
Sunday at 6:00: Lutheran Student Club (Gamma
Delta). Supper and Program. Showing of two
recently produced religious movies.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
William S. Baker, University Pastor
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Mr. Mitchell
preaching, "Religion without Applause."
5:30 P.M.: The Summer Student Fellowship will
have a picnic supper. George Mendenhall,
Asst. Prof. of Near Eastern Studies, will speak
on Biblical Archeology.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
10:00 A.M.: Student Bible Class studies "The
Book of Daniel."
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship. Sermon Topic,
"Good and Faithful Servants."
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M.: Bible Class.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service
7:00 P.M.: Informal Meeting.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: "God And The Nation."
7:30 P.M.: "Who Is My Neighbor?"
8:00 Wednesday: Prayer Meeting.
A Friendly Church where the Word is preached.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8:00 A.M., 10:00 A.M., 11:30 AM.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7;30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Walter S. Press, "The Use of'Our Capabilities."
11:30 A.M.: Broadcast of the Sermon over WHRV.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland v. Wangdohl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
10:45 A.M.: Morning worship, "The Expanding
Horizon" Rev. Wangdohl, preaching.
2:30 P.M.: Student group meet in Wesley Lounge
for picnic outing at nearby lake. Swimming,
volley-ball, picnic supper. Vesper worship ser-
vice, leader Norman Frisch. All students wel-
come.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation rooms, open daily.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Commentary.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
11:00 A.M.: Church School (Summer Term, thru
6th grade)
8:00 P.M.: Evensong, St. Michael's Chapel.
During the Week
Wednesday, 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion; Friday,
12:10 P.M.: Holy Communion.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING Lane Hall
11:00 A.M. Sundays. Visitors welcome.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
August 9.-Spirit
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free readina room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.

'p

x.-

_\

You'll Say

t

I

"Next Week is the Last of Their Yearly Clearance
and the Values are Marvelous."

il * * * * * * * * * * *_Il

WOOL SUITS-All can be worn for Fall
and Winter. Sizes 9 to 15, 10 to 40,
121/2 to 241/2. ot25.00 and 39.95
Originally 49.95 to 79.95.
SPRING COATS - Shorties and Long,
pastels and darks. . . at 25.00 to 39.95.
at 5.00
Group of Dresses (mostly cotton)
Better Slacks and Playtogs . . . Better
Blouses of nylon, orlon, silk or rayon ...
Costume Jewelry (genuine zircon set
rings) . . . Nylon gowns and slips-. .
Orlon, wool and better Cotton Skirts...
Jackets.

WONDERFUL BUYS in Dresses . . .
Many dark crepes and failles included.
Sizes 9 to 15, 10 to 44, 121/2 to 241/2.
Originally 10.95 to 39.95,.
Now from 5.00 to 19.98.
at 2.95
GROUP OF BLOUSES (Nylons, rayons,
better cottons) .. . Handbags (patent
plastics, straws, bamboos) . . . Taffeta
Petticoats, Cotton Skirts, Shorts, Pedal
Pushers, Slacks, Halters, Weskits, Nylon
Bras, Hats, Costume Jewelry.
at 1.00
Cotton Bros Nylon Hose. Hots, Gloves.

For Worry-f ree Trips, Use
TRAVELERS CHECKS
* * *I
Travelers Checks offer both convenience and
safety for your vacation trips. You can cash
them almost anywhere - Hotels, Restaurants,
and Stores - and because only YOU can cash
them, you can enjoy away-from-home secur-
ity, too.
* * *

11

11

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Thursdays: 7:30 P M , Bible Study.
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth."
WXYZ-ABC Network

If

11

at 1.49 I

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Street
Leonard A. Parr, Minister

4$1

II

III

I i

I

11

11

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan