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August 07, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-08-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'AGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 1953

i

Legal Snarls
Stall State
RoadGroup
LANSING-()-Legal compli-
cations loomed yesterday as a
road-block to Michigan's newly-
organized turnpike authority.
Members of the authority, crea-
ted to plan and construct toll
roads in the state, indicated they
would be interested first in push-
ing ahead a Detroit-Toledo toll
road with a possible extension to
Saginaw.
BUT STATE Highway Commis-
sioner Charles M. Ziegler warned
that there may be opposition to
the project along communities
downriver from Detroit.
The city of Monroe, he said,
already has agreed with the state
to float bonds for a freeway. And
there is a legal question of whether
Monroe and other communities
will now agree to a toll highway.
The authority agreed to ask the
attorney general to explore the
possibilities of a ,legal snarl. And
it was indicated if the Detroit-
Toledo road is delayed the author-
ity may start considering a De-
troit-Chicago toll road.

--Daily-Chuck Ritz
ACTOR-TEACHER TAYLOR
* * * *
Actor Taylor Stresses
Children's Theater Need.

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By PAT ROELOFS
You mnight call him a chameleon.
He's appeared on campus this
summer as a sewer man, Roose-
velt, a drama producer, a member
of the British cockney set aid an
innkeeper. And he's not an im-
poster.
WILILAM TAYLOR alias "Uncle
Bill," is an annual summer school
member of the University speech
department. He received both his
undergraduate and Masters de-
grees in speech here.
Discussing his roles of the pre-
sent summer (he has had a ma-
jor role in every speech depart-
ment production in this summer
session), "Uncle Bill" probably,
enjoyed playing Roosevelt in
"Knickerbocker Holiday" most
"because it got a good review."
His singing voice, however, ac-
cording to orchestra directors, is
"unclasified" . . "I can only
sing the melody somewhere be-
tween tenor and bass," he said.
Formerly a high school drama
and English teacher in Oxford,
his home town, Taylor this fall
will take over the new drama work-
shop program in Ann Arbor High
School.
* * *
DISCUSSING THE importance
of educational theater, Taylor be-
lieves there is a strong need for
dramatic programs in the second-
ary education systems, including
children's theater at the elemen-
tary level.
"But only qualified teachers
should be allowed to teach the-
ater courses, not those who have
majored in other fields," he em-
phasized.
"Only when schools realize that
theater should be artistic and edu-
cational," he continued, "and not
merely a means of organizing class
projects, will high schools abandon
the traditional productions like the
Aaron Slick From Punkin Crick
sort of play, and put on legitimate
productions."
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY speech and
play production program offers
excellent training for qualified in-

structors in drama, according to
Taylor who remarked that the
"discipline and wholesome en-
vironment here are conducive to
producing good teachers."
Changing the subject to his
avocations, the versatile actor-
teacher said, that travel is his
hobby, mostly in this country,
but "Uncle Sam did send me to
Europe" a few years ago. "I hate
television" Taylor remarked, al-
though he felt this attitude was
unlike most people interested in
the stage because TV is fast be-
coming a major area in which
dramatic talent can be exploited.
Recalling recent drama criti-;
cisms and newspaper reviews, "Un-i
cle Bill" as an actor said his main
gripe is the literary discussion
many reviewers, believe important+
to a review, whereas-really the per-
formances and production as a
whole are what the players them-
selves, and probably the readers
are looking for.
* * * -
RETURNING TO the subject of
drama teachings, the actor stated
that "high school dramatic in-
structors should be as superior as
college instructors." He went on to
point out that, although the final
performance of a high school play
is not on the college level, the
growth of the actor from the time
he is given a part 'to the actual
production is just as apparent or
even more so in the high school
student than the college student.
And on this closing observation,
the stage manager handed "Uncle
Bill" a tray of beer mugs and sent
him before the audience as an inn-
keeper in "Tales of Hoffmann."
'State Fair' Marks
Final 'U'_Showing
The SL Cinema Guild's final
showings of the Rodgers and
Hammerstein musical "State Fair"
will be at 7 and 9 p.m. today in the
Architecture Auditorium.
"The Maltese Falcon" will be
shown at 7 and 9 p.m. tomorrow
and at 8 p.m. Sunday.

Rufus
NEW YORK - (A') - Rufus
the Restless Hornbill was aloft
over Lower Manhattan for a
second day.
The confusion was utter and
delightful.
Traffic was blocked in the
streets. Hundreds of New York-
ers passed up lunch to chear
and applaud Rufus, who did ev-
erything but take a bow.
A $200 red-necked hornbill
from Siam, he escaped from
a pet shop Wednesday morning.
Famfly S een
In Relation
To Economy
The unique features of Ameri-
can family structure are closely
related to our economy and occu-
pational structure, Prof. Talcott
Parsons, Chairman of the Har-
vard University Department of So-
cial Relations said yesterday.
Speaking to a near capacity
crowd on "The American Family,"
Prof. Parsons told his audience
that there are two distinct char-
acteristics of the American family.
* * *
THE FIRST is the lack of an
extensive kinship group beyond
the small family of parents and
children, and the second is the
fact that the function of the fam-
ily in this country is reaching
"rock bottom," he said.
However Prof. Talcott said he
does not believe that the family
is disappearing as an institu-
tion.
Tighter solidarity of kinship re-
lations beyond the immediate f am-
ily cannot exist in a highly mobile
society, the Harvard professor de-
clared.
One of these characteristics
must be forfeited and in our so-
ciety close relationship with a lar-
ger family group has been sacri-
ficed, he said.
"I DON'T THINK this ris an
individualistic society," he told his
audience. Most of our industrial
achievements require a great deal
of organization the Professor ex-
plained.
Americans have resisted central-
ization in the name of subgroups
rather than individuals, and one
of our most important subgroups
is the family, he commented.

VISITING LECTURER:
A kzinSees Little Chance
For Israeli-Arab Peacej

By ELSIE KUFFLER
"Unfortunately, there is little
chance of an early peace and re-
conciliation between Israel and
neighboring Arab states," Prof.
Benjamin Akzin, visiting professor
in the political science department
said.
Prof. Akzin, who teaches at the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem,
Israel, explained that the leaders
of the Arab states have not yet be-
** *

"and it ought to give Jews af
chance to show how good orbad
they are when they are on their
own."
COMPARED TO the record of
other nations, Israel has proved it-
self in the first five years of its
existence worthy of the chance, he
continued.
Prior to his invitation to Jer-
usalem in 1949, when the Hebrew
University instituted its law
school and inaugurated a politi-
cal science department in the
liberal arts college, Prof. Akzin
had lived in the United States
since 1932.
After having taught in this
country and serving in the Library
of Congress, Prof.. Akzin (who
holds doctorates from the Univer-
sities of Vienna, Paris and Har-
vard) now teaches political science
and constitutional law and in ad-
dition serves as Dean of the law
school of the Hebrew University.
THE KINDLY professor was
"appalled" at first by conditions
under which students and profes-
sors worked at Israeli's only uni-
versity. But he soon came to ad-
mire the superior results achieved
against such overwhelming ob-
stacles as lack of books and labor-
atories, inadequate housing and
teaching in rented buildings, he
said.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)

THE BEST IN RECORDED MUSIC
Required course for lovelier curves!
WARNER -WONDERFUL'

.Y

..a-
::;
::i:::
>;sr'
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'I I

PROF. BENJAMIN AKZIN
... Israeli law expert
* * *
come reconciled to the idea that
a Jewish state should exist at all
and make no secret of their desire
to liquidate it as soon possible.
* * *
"AS A matter of fact" he added
somewhat wistfully, "a great many
others beside Arabs, having be-
come accustomed to the fact that
Jews, alone of all peoples have no
state oftheir own, are still shock-
ed by the idea. Only time will
make them change their attitude."
Concerning the effect of the
formation of Israel on the sta-
'tus of the Jews in America, Prof.
Akzin commented that the "ex-
istence of a Jewish State should
affect that status no more than
the independence of Ireland or
Sweden or Liberia should affect
the status of Americans of Irish,
Swedish, or Negro ancestry."
However, it should help the Jews
o those countries where they are
oppressed the professor added,

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'1

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"State
"Back.
and 9

Fair" in Technicolor. Cartoon:
Alley Uproar." Showings at ?
p.m., Architecture Auditorium.

1,

The Fresh Air Camp Clinic: Dr. Ralph
Rabinovitch will be the psychiatrist.
Students with atprofessional interest
are welcome to attend. Main Lodge, Uni-1
versity of Michigan Fresh Air Camp,
Patterson Lake, eight o'clock.
Corning Events
Lutheran Student Association (Na-
tionalLutheran Council) Hill and For-
est Ave. Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Bible Class;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Informal Meeting.

-' CAMPUS -
211 S. State St.
Phone 9013
DOWNTOWN
205 E. Liberty St.
Phone 2-0675

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DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING

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Sunbathers Swarm to Meeting
At Battle Creek Nudist Camp

(ir----

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8 Nickels Arcade

By MILFRED PRYCE
Special to The Daily
BATTLE CREEK-Volleyball is
what you might call the national
sport of nudists . . . at least at
Sunshine Gardens Resort," said
Elmer Adams, co-director of Mich-
igans largest nudist camp.
Celebrating the annual conven-
tion of the camp, approximately
300 people have poured in from
all over Michigan and the sur-
rounding states.
THE CAMP, dedicated to "the
healthy body-and sun, light, and
air" is located about eight miles
from Battle Creek, on a 140 acre
plot containing a private lake.
It is surrounded on three sides
by an innocent looking fence which
is actually wired for sound so that
any mischievous person climbing
over can be detected in the main
office. The fourth side of the camp
is bordered by a swamp.
"The average age of the mem-
bers is around 35 although wej
have children as young as three
and men as old as 80," Ad-j
ams remarked. "Sunshine and

Health," one of the nudist per-
iodicals, said that about 90% of
all nudists are family members.
Adams said that many single
people stay at his camp, which is
open all year. "We usually- have
two or three marriages a year of
couples who spent some time at
the camp."
NEXT SPRING we might even
have a completely nude wedding.
This will be the third such wedding
in the United States and the first
in the state of Michigan. Of course
this is highly speculative."
There are several strict rules to
which all nudist camps subscribe.
No liquor or swearing is permitted.
Smoking is frowned upon, but only
because it constitutes a fire haz-
ard.
Located in the basement of Sun
Valley Lodge are 500 parakeets.
Adams calls parakeet raising his
"winter occupation."
"However," he added, "many
people come up here in the winter
time to our monthly indoor par-
ties or just to rest."

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