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August 04, 1953 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-08-04

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(

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, AUGUJST 4, 1953

-w

Mangrum Wins Tam Golf Crown
Shoots 67 on Final Round; Major League Standings
orld Meet Next at a AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
W T Pt. G"R W L Pct .GB

(CIAssIFEEDS

t,

_

SLUGGERS-The Chicago Cubs have the two top home run
hitters in the National League in Hank Sauer (left). and Ralph
Kiner (right). The two led the league last year in round-
trippers. Kiner was traded to the Cubs early in the season, and
the Bruins now possess a right-handed one-two batting punch
that ranks with the strongest in the National League in recent
years.
Stanky Inks Longest Contract
Ever Given to Cardinal Pilot

CHICAGO - (,P) - Lloyd Man-
grum, jaunty 39-year-old grand-
pappy, yesterday pocketed the
$3,420 -top prize at Tam O'Shanter
by winning the All-American golf
crown with a pressure-jammed
last round of 67.
His 72-hole total of 275 was 13
strokes under par 36-36-72 for the
6,9 15-yard layout.
MANGRUM, the Tam's tourn- F
ment circuit representative, thus
started what he hopes will be an-
other grand slam at the club.
In 1948, he captured both the
All American and following
"world championship" meets, a
combined effort worth $25,000.
The Tam O'Shanter $90,000
"World" tournament starts
Thursday with the winner re-
ceiving $25,000.
Yesterday's victory came with a
closing nine-hole score of 32 that
was climaxed by sinking a 23
foot chip from the back fringe of
the 18th hole for a birdie 3. The
triumph put Mangrum ahead of
Ben Hogan for the season's mon-
ey-winning lead, boosting his
jackpot to $18,786.
MANGRUM also stayed ahead
in the PGA race for Vardon Tro-
phy honors by averaging 70.1
strokes through 60 competitive
rounds this season.
Mangrum's final 35 - 32 - 67
smothered great finishes by his
rivals and gave him a three-
stroke margin over Ted Kroll of
New Hartford, N.Y., and defend-
ing champion Sam Snead.
Kroll birdied the last two holes
for a 34-33-67 while Snead eagled
the 515-yard 15th with a five foot
putt and birdied the 17th for a
36-32-68. Each totaled 278 and
bagged $2,180.
Walter Burkemo, the current
PGA champion from Franklin,
Mich., folded on the 'final nine
after being tied with Mangrum at
63 holes and ended with 34-36-70
for 179, fourth place worth $1,700.

Frank Stranahan won his sixth
straight All American men's ama-
teur title, beating out Tam's club
champion, John Levinson, 288 to
291. Each fired final 70s.
*: * *
PATTY BERG won her third
All-American women's open golf
tourney yesterday and a $1,000
top prize by a one-stroke margin
over another seasoned pro, Louise
Suggs.
Miss Suggs, registered from Chi-
cago, finished with 35-41-76, two
under Tam O'Shanter's 38-38-76
women's par, for a 72-hole total
of 308.

New York
Chicago
Cleveland
Boston
Washington
Philadelphia
Detroit
St. Louis
S*

67
63
60
57
49
43
38
35

34
40
42
48
55
59
64
70

c.
.663
.612
.588
.543
.471
.422
.372
.333

5
12
19% ,
2 4 1
293
34

Brooklyn
Milwaukee
Philadelphia
St. Louis
New York
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh

67
59
55
55
52
49
36
33

35
44
44
45
46
55
62
75

U.
.675
.573
.556
.550
.531
.471
.367
.306

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 11, St. Louis 3
Chicago 1, Washington 0
Only Games Scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at New York (night)
St. Louis at Boston (night)-
Chicago at Philadelphia (night)
Cleveland at Washington (night)

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 8, Philadelphia 3
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 0
Brooklyn 1, Milwaukee 0
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Chicago
Brooklyn at Milwaukee (night)
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
Philadelphia at St. Louis

Yankees Murder Browns Again, 11-3;
Pieree Blanks Senators for ite Sox

8%
10l/
11
13
19
29
37

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1 96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, sanforized. whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.00. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One wool rug $65. Two large walnut
veneer buffets. $15 each. One small
folding steel cot $10.00. Large daven-
port with green leatherette, $15. Two
doll high chairs, $2.50 each. Phone
2-9020.
CANARIES and Parakeets. Bird supplies
and cages. 526 S. Seventh at W. Mad-
ison. Mrs. Louise Ruffins.
TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE-New ranch-
style house and 2 lots, 10 min. drive
from Ann Arbor. Priced for quick sale
at $9,700. Very reasonable terms. Ph.
2-3245.
B&L MICROSCOPE-Monocular auto-
matic stage lens 3.2. 10, 43, 97. Eye
pieces 5 and 10. Carrying case. Excel-
lent condition $180. Call 3-4849.
TRAILER-2-wheel, metal sides, com-
plete with hitch, ready for your mov-
ing, vacationing, hauling, etc. Phone
25-7843.
FOR RENT
BACHELOR QUARTERS for Fall. Large,
comfortable single room for two grad
students. Private entrance, bath, gar-
age, refrigerator. Located in quiet
residential neighborhood. Telephone
2-7886.
DELUXE Bachelor Apt. Private entrance.
Semi-private bath. Between Ypsi and
Ann Arbor. $67.50 a month. Ph. 2-9020.

ST. LOUIS-(A')-Eddie Stanky,
the peppery little St. Louis Cardi-
nal manager, yesterday signed a
new three-year contract, the long-
est ever given to a Red Bird pilot.
Stanky was also given a major
voice in the operation of the Card's
farm system.
* * *
AUGUST A, Busch, Jr., said
Stanky's new contract, expiring in
1956 meant that "We intend to re-
build our ball club around him."
Busch said from now on the
emphasis throughout the Cardi-
nal farm chain will be on pro-
ducing outstanding young play-
ers for the parent club, with
Stanky calling the signals for
minor league managers and di-
rectors.
The new contract was under-
stood to call for the same salary
Stanky has been getting-$40,000
a year..
BUSCH SAID the Cardinals,
now 11 games out of first place,
still have faint hopes of the Na-
tional League pennant. But he said
for the remainder of the season
Stanky has been asked to experi-
ment with new players and com-
binations of new players.
He said he and Stanky were
aware the policy would involve
GOLFERS
Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
-21/2 miles out Washte-
now - right on U.S. 23
for 1 mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10A.M.- 11 P.M.

risks in close games, but they
were willing to take the gamble
for the future of the club.
Promising young players will be
brought up to the Cardinals im-
mediately for a tryout, Busch in-
dicated, instead of serving long ap-
prenticeships in the minors.
* * *.'
STANKY SAID the accent on
youth doesn't mean such veteran
players as Stan Musial, Enos
Slaughter and Red Schoendiest
would be sidetracked.
"Men like these," Stanky
said, "are the backbone and nu-
cleus of our team. We're going
to build around them."
The 35-year-old Stanky came
to the Cardinals as manager in
1952 from the New York Giants.
He had played on three pennant-
winning clubs in the previous five
years, the Giants, Brooklyn Dodg-
ers and Boston Braves.
'Little Mo' Stars
Against British
RYE, N.Y. - (Y') -- America's
dominant women tennis players,
with Maureen (Little Mo) Connol-
ly and Doris Hart uroviding the
one-two punch, swept to their 17th
straight Wightman Cup victory
over Great Britain yesterday with-
out loss of a set.
The final score was 7-0, the sixth
shutout since the last war and
the 25th triumph for Uncle Sam's
nieces against four defeats in the
woefully one-sided international
series dating back to 1923.
Although Misses Connolly and
Hart were the individual standouts,
figuring in six of the seven points,
it remained for Shirley Fry of Ak-
ron, Ohio, to score the clinching
decision with a 6-2, 6-4 win over
Mrs. Jean Quertier Rinkel, Brit-
ain's best woman player.

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - The New York
Yankees crushed the lowly St.
Louis Browns yesterday with an
18-hit attack against three hap-
less hurlers.
Scoring early and often, the
Yankees routed their one-time
nemesis, southpaw Bob Cain, in a
four-run fourth inning, and con-
tinued their slugfest against right-
handers Marlin Stuart and Mike
Blyzka.
* *
FOUR OF the Yankee hits were{
garnered by Pitcher Whitey Ford,
who shut out the Browns in all
but the eighth inning when the
tail-enders collected four of their
11 hits to score all their runs. It
was Ford's 12th victory against
four defeats.
The Yankees didn't hit any
homers but they ripped off four
triples and three doubles. Hank
Bauer cracked two triples and
drove in three runs. Irv Noren
and Ford collected four hits each.
Yogi Berra rapped a double and

single. Phil Rizzuto and Billy was the only Cincinnati hit dur-
Martin got the other triples. ing the inning as catcher Toby
* * * Atwell also erred and had a
WHITE SOX 1, SENATORS 0 passed ball charged against him.
WASHINGTON - Billy Pierce, Andy Seminick's two-run homer
surviving a ninth inning threat, over the left center field wall, his
pitched a two-hitter last night to 12th, hiked Cincinnati's advantage
give the Chicago White Sox a 1-0 to 4-0 in the fourth. The itedlegs
victory over Washington. scored their fifth and final run
Pierce fanned nine in winning in the sixth when Seminick
his 13th game and took over the doubled off the scoreboard and
major league strikeout lead from Roy McMillan's bloop single sent
the Phillies' Robin Roberts with him home.I
124. Two of the hits that Nuxhall
* * * gave up came in the first inning
THE WHITE SOX scored their with one out.
run in the ninth without benefit * * *
of a hit off Johnny Schmitz, who CARDS 8, PHILLIES 3
yielded six hits previously. ST. LOUIS - The St. Louis Car-
Tom Wright was hit by a dinals, successful with an early-
pitched ball and Red Wilson inning attack, stopped a ninth-in-
sacrificed. Third baseman Ed ning Philadelphia drive to take an
Yost fielded Wilson's bunt and 8-3 decision from the Phillies last
fired to shortstop Jerry Snyder night.
at second base, but Wright Vingar Bend Mizell went into
crashed heavily into Snyder. The the ninth with only three hits
shortstop dropped the ball and against him but Connie Ryan
while Snyder remained prone spoiled the shutout with a two-
in front of second Wright raced run home run.
to third. Sherman Lollar, bat- --
ting for Jim Rivera, got Wright DID YOU KNOW: that Michi-
across with a long fly to Jim gan has made three appearances
Busby in center field. in the Rose Bowl, winning all three
Snyder left the game with a se- against West Coast opposition?
verely injured left shoulder and The first victory came in 1902 and
was taken to Georgetown Hos- was by a score of 49-0 over Stan-
pital for x-rays. ford. The second triumph came
* . * on New Year's Day 1948 and was

FOR RENT
ACCOMMODATIONS for Fall are avail-
able for men students now in large
double rooms in house 5 minutes
from campus. Call 3-0849, 406 Packard.
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
liam St. Phone 3-8454.
PERSONAL
THERE'S NOT much more time for
students and faculty to subscribe at
summer special rates to Time ($3),
Life ($4), and numerous other mags.
For informatio phone Student Peri-
odical Agency, 6007.
TRANSPORTATION
CAN TAKE RIDERS to Washington,
D.C. on August 3 or 4. Call.Jim Black-
man, 8793.
WANTED-Ride to U.P. Leave after 4
p.m., Aug. 13. Ph. 202 Hayden, E.Q.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., Free Sample and details.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, Finished Work, and Band
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
RADIO-PHONO SERVICE
" Fast-In Today, Ready Tomorrow
" Reasonable Rates-Guaranteed Seryice
" Phonos & Auto Radios Our Specialty
" New & Used Radios & Phonos
" Custom Auto Radios at Reduced Price
ANN ARBOR 'RADIO & T..
1215 So. University Ph. 7942,
ENDS TODAY
'"A delight.
a gent"
--Alton Cook,
World Telegram & Sun
"Lovely and beguiling, touched
with magic!"
-Bosley Crowther, Times
YOU'LL
LOVE...
M -
LESLIE' MEL JEAM PIENI
URlON FEIIRAJMO~ff;
TECHNICOLOR

,4

i

Arm Trouble Plagues Shantz,
May Be Through for Season

READ
AND
USE
DAILY
CLASS I FIEDS

PHILADELPHIA - (AP) - Bobby
Shantz, the sensation of baseball
last year and the American Lea-
gue's most valuable player of 1952,
may be through for the season.
The Philadelphia Athletics'
pitcher left Sunday's first game
against Cleveland with a recur-
rence of the arm injury that side-
lined him for seven weeks recently.
His arm stiffened in the fourth
inning.
THIS HAS been a rough season
for the smallest pitcher in base-
ball. He's won five and lost eight
as compared with a 19-3 mark a
this same time in 1952 and a sea-
sonal log of 24-7. He's been plagued
with arm trouble since injuring a
muscle in his shoulder in Boston
earlier in the campaign.
The southpaw came back
about 10 days ago and won two
games. He rested a week before
starting in the rain and cold
against Cleveland Sunday. Man-
ager Jimmy Dykes of the Ath-
letics removed his ace with
Cleveland leading 2-0.
Dykes gloomily surveyed the sit-
uation yesterday:
"I don't know when I'll use him
again, but I do know it won't be

until I'm quite sure his arm and
shoulder are all right. Right now,
they aren't all right, no mistake
about it."
* . *
DYKES indicated he was going
to keep Shantz on the bench-pos-
sibly even the rest of the year-to
make sure the little hurler will be
of future use to the A's.
"Bobby is a great pitcher with
plenty of future-he's only 27. I
wouldn't want the responsibility
of letting him maybe ruin himself
for life just on the chance of win-
ning one game."
Confident Tigers
To OpposeYanks
NEW YORK-(A")-The Detroit
Tigers, flushed with four straight
wins over the Boston Red Sox,
moved into New York today to
open a three-game series with the
Yankees tonight.
Their chances of taking the New
York series seemed hinged on
whether third baseman Ray Boone
can keep up his sensational hitting
that currently is the talk of the
American League.
Boone climaxed an 11-game hit-
ting string Sunday by blasting out
six hits, including a homer, triple
and two doubles, in nine trips to
the plate during a doubleheader
against the Red Sox.
That sensational performance
boosted his season average to .302,
one point above long-time Tiger
leader Harvey Kuenn.

FIRST BASEMAN Ferris Fain
left town, reportedly for Philadel-
phia, before last night's game.
Fain was involved in a tavern
brawl at nearby Colmar Manor,
Md., Sunday night and is being
sued for $50,000.
He left Washington before a
U. S. Marshal served papers.
Fain had a gashed forehead, a
bruised left hand and a scratch-
ed cheek.
Pierce possessed a one-hitter for
81/3 innings. The lone hit to that
point was Mickey Vernon's fourth
inning single, but with one out in
the ninth Keith Thomas batted
for Schmitz and singled. Yost
walked, but Wayne Terwilliger
popped out and Vernon became
Pierce's ninth strikeout victim.
REDLEGS 5, PIRATES 0
CINCINNATI - Joe Nuxhall
blanked the last-place Pittsburgh
IPirates on five hits last night for
a 5-0 Cincinnati victory.
The triumph was the fourth
straight for the Redlegs and all
were won by lefthanded pitchers.
** *
LOSER Paul LePalme aided in
his own downfall with an error
and wild pitch as the Redlegs
scored two quick runs in the zany
first inning.
Gus Bell's run-scoring single
ry

over Southern California by the
same score. The 49-0 count is the
highest ever run up in the Rose,
Bowl. In 1951, Michigan defeated
California by a 14-6 score for its
third victory.

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Today and Wednesday

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