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July 29, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-29

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PAGE EIGHT

TIE MICItGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 1953

STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM, BUT NO MIDDLEMAN:

Market

Features

'Farmer-to-Consumer'

Set-up

* * * *

b

* .*

** *

* #

T,

LEARNING THE STOCK OF THE MARKET

Every Wednesday and Saturday
when Mr. and Mrs. Rural Michigan
Farmer pack an assortment of
homemade bread and preserves
and homegrown berries and toma-
toes into a battered old pickup
truck along with the children, the
cat and a neighbor or two, their
destination is Ann Arbor's Farm-
er's Market.
They come from a radius of 60
to 100 miles to sell their wares un-
der the metal roof of an extended
V-shape area in what is more for-
mally titled "Ann Arbor Munici-
pal Market," 315 Detroit St.
AS EARLY as 6 a.m. they ar-
rive and begin setting out baked
goods in waxed paper wrappers,
eggs - cracked and otherwise -
(cracked usually priced ten cents
less per dozen) on display tables.
Although their scheduled
hours are from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
many usually sell out and leave
the market for home long be-
fore closing time.
Each stall in the square is sold
to one stall holder. Vacant stalls
are made available to transcient
f armers.
First rule of the market is all
merchandise must be self-produc-
ed-either grown or made by the
seller himself - eliminating ,the
middleman.
BY THE TIME the unfortunate
student with an 8 o'clock is ris-
ing for class, the market place is
a crazy quilt of color. Right along
side an assortment of radishes and
berries are bunches of long-stem-
med gladioli or just odds and ends
of mid-summer blooms.
While the stallholders keep an
eye on competitive egg prices,
Ann Arbor townspeople roam the
aisles doing their own com-
parative shopping.
A special feature for the custo-
mers is the city's consumer edu-
cation program. Each month a
guest expert lectures on "How to
Shop."
Last Saturday a special guest
from Michigan State College spoke
at the south end of the market on
"How to Buy and What to Look
for in Vegetables."
A similar talk on the merits of
pickles is slated for Aug. 21 with
lessons in fall fruit buying, shop-
ping for winter vegetables and
choosing poultry and eggs set for
later dates.

AMONG THE EGGS, LETTUCE, TOMATOES AND ONIONS-
A BUNCH OF ROSES

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Specials from Ramsay's
Regular 50c Note Paper
2 for 75c
Regular $1.00 Stationery
65c each, 2 for $1.25
Regular $1.50 Stationery
Now $1.00
Different Sizes, Colors, Weights
OTHER GIFT ITEMS OF FINE QUALITY
AT REDUCED PRICES
RAMSAY PRINTERS

r-

f'

BLACKBERRIES-DELIGHTFUL WITH MY WHEATIES
REMINGTON 'SERVANT'.
Story by
MacArthur Invests Funds Gayle Greene
In Bonds, Not Company Stock Photos by
1 r ( [I

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING QUICK RESULTS

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BARGAINS for
Wednesday and Thursday
OUR DAYS TO OFFER THIS SEASON'S STOCK AT
BELOW COST REDUCTIONS TO MAKE THESE THE
BEST BARGAIN DAYS WE'VE EVER HAD.

BUFFALO, N.Y. - ( ') -- Gen.
Douglas MacArthur got in the last
word yesterday in an oral exchange
with a stockholder who represents
small stockholders in big corpora-
tions.
Calmly, but in direct language,
the retired five-star general told
Lewis D. Gilbert of New York City 1
that it was none of Gilbert's busi-
ness what MacArthur did with
his money.
Gilbert inquired why MacArthur
didn't hold stock, in the company.
The general replied that under
the corporation's by-laws a direc-
ot need not hold stock.
"I am an employe and a ser-
vant of the company, and not
one of its owners," MacArthur
said. "I'm not as fortunate as
you are, Mr. Gilbert."

MacArthur said his investment
funds were in government bonds,
and added:
"As to what I do with funds I
may acquire in the future, it is
neither your business, Mr. Gil-
bert, nor anyone else's."
Gilbert raised his voice above
the resulting applausevto say he
would introduce a resolution next
year to require that all directors
hold at least 100 shares.
'U' Grad Gets Post
The Dexter school system has
appointed Charles W. Stout, a
graduate of the University music
school as director of instrumental
music.

I

Group of 100% Wool Suits
- dark colors, tweeds and
gabardines. Sizes 9-15, 10.
20, 12 -22 .
Group of Spring Coats --
100% wool and orlon; pas-
tels, white and dark shades.
Many originally priced to
$59.95.

$ 2500
Any two $14.95
Sale Priced Items
purchased together
25.00
t

Group of Better Dresses and
Costume Suits - crepe, silk
shantung and faille. Also
evening and dinner dresses.
All sizes.
Group of Rain or Shine Coats
- Gabardine and checks.

.o.

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Two Groups of Better Dresses - $1495 Two Groups of Rayon Suits
many good for fall and winter.
Failles, taffetas, bembergs, pure to $35.00 - wrinkle resistant fabrics.
silks, prints and shantungs. Sizes Pastels and dark colors to
9-15, 10-44,, and )121/2-241/2. 1 wear through fall. Sizes 9-
Evening and dinner dresses in- includes all cottons
lud.to $17.95-Many Values. 15, 10-40, 121/2_221/2.
luded to $25.00
at $5.00 at $2.95
Group of Blouses (nylon, rayons, better cot-
Group of Dresses (mostly cotton) - Better tons) - Handbags (patent plastics, straws,
slaks nd latog -- Btte bluss o nyon bamboos) - Taffeta Petticoats - Cotton
slacks and playtogs -- Bitter blouses of nylon, Skirts - Shorts - Pedal Pushers - Slacks -
orlon, silk or rayon - Costume jewelry (genu. Halters -- Wesksits - Nylon Bras - Hats -
ine zircon set rings) - Nylon gowns and slips Costume Jewelry.
-- Orion, wool and better cotton skirts -- ANY TWO $2.95, SALE ITEMS
Jackets. PURCHASED TOGETHER FOR $5.00

. ... J
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\ , x /
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,.

It's

BARGAIN
DAY

at the
QUARRY

Beginning This Morning at 9:30
ENTIRE REMAINING SUMMER STOCK
of
SUITS
DRESSES
SPORTSWEAR
BLOUSES
HOSIERY
BELTS
LINGERIE
SHOES
SCARFS
HANDBAGS
Reduced as much as /i and more

'
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~y

.:.

Plastic Cosmetic Kits. 1.00 and 1.25
Assorted Colognes
and Perfumes..... .... 40% OFF

HATS
Straws, Braids, Piques, Felts
Originally to $8.95

$198

HANDBAGS
All $3.95 Summer Handbags.
Also group of patent plastics.

to

Slips - Purses -- Cotton Blouses --Jewelry
T-Shirts - Petticoats- Bras -- Many Other
Odds and Ends
at $1.00 at 49c
Cotton Bras- Nylon Hose-Hats - r. e L.?.

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Atomizers
Bathing Caps
2.Beach Bags
Sun Tan Oil
Foundation Makeup
Lipstick and
Lipstick Kits
Rouge

ALL
4O
OFF

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