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July 25, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 1953

TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

ilwaukee

Ou s lugs

Brooklyn,

1 1-6'

CLASSIFIEDS]

7.

a

LOST AND FOUND

Giants seat
Redlegs, 3-1
By The Associated Press
BROOKLYN - The Milwaukee
Braves swamped the league-lead-
ing Brooklyn Dodgers, 11-6, last
night to cut the Dodgers' first-
place margin to 41/2 games.
Eddie Mathews drove in two
runs with his 30th home run and
Walker Cooper drove in three with
his second circuit blast.
* * *
BOTH DRIVES came in the fifth
inning when the Braves poured
across seven runs to rout Billy
Loes, the young righthander who
had beaten them five times this
season.
The crowd of 27,948 had a
chance to get excited in the
eighth inning when the Dodg-
ers rallied for four runs but Lew
Burdette came to Max Sur-
kont's rescue and put down the
threat. The victory was Sur-
kont's 11th of the year. Three
of the Brooklyn runs came on
Roy Campanella's 25th homer
in the eighth.
PHILLIES 2, CARDS 1
PHILADELPHIA-Granny Ham-
ner cracked two home runs, the
second in the bottom half of the
ninth inning, to give Bob Miller
and the Philadelphia Phillies a
hard-fought 2-1 victory over the
St. Lou's Cardinals last night.
TIGERS 5, YANKS 1
DETROIT - Young Billy Hoeft,
who once struck out 27 players in
a high school game, fanned eight
New York Yankees last night and
gave up only three hits in pitching
the Detroit Tigers to a 5-1 vic-
tory over the world champions.
SENATORS 6, INDIANS 4
CLEVELAND-Mickey Vernon's
triple and double drove in half of
Washington's runs last night as
the Senators beat the Cleveland
Indians, 6-4.
The Senators who had won only
one of their previous 12 games,
took the lead in the first inning
with none out and never were
headed. The long contest ran 3
hours, 22 minutes, 16 minutes short
of a record length.
CStiena SL gd
TONIGHT!
at 7:00 & 9:30 P.M.
Sunday at 8:00 Only

NO MORE SPECIALISTS:
New Grid Rule Aids All-Round Player

(Final in a Series on the Approaching
Football Season)
By IVAN N. KAYE
Last winter, the N.C.A.A. rules
committee threw out the two-pla-
toon statute and returned football
to its pre-war level.
The new rule states that once a
player is withdrawn from the first
and third periods, he may not re-
enter the game during those quar-
ters. In the second and fourth per-
iods the same holds true except
that during the last four 'minutes
of each, a player may go back in
the game if previously withdrawn.
* * *
THE GAME is thus returned to
the all-round player, and taken
from the hands of the specialist.
The accent in 1953 is on versatil-
ity and overall ability.
Oddly enough, it was Michi-
gan's Athletic Director Fritz
Crisler, who as chairman of the
N.C.A.A. rules committee pre-
sided over the liquidation of the
idea which he, himself popular-
ized in 1945.
It was in October of that year
that Crisler, faced with the un-
happy prospect of meeting a na-
tional champion Army team, de-
vised the platoon system as a
means of conserving the sparse
manpower of a Michigan squad
which was composed mainly of
seventeen year olds.
THE TWO-PLATOON system
made history in Yankee Stadium
as the Wolverines, rated five touch-
down underdogs, played mighty
Army to a complete standstill un-
til halfway through the fourth
quarter. At this point, Army's tre-
mendous reserve strength finally
wore Michigan down, and Glenn
Davis ran for two touchdowns and
a 28-7 victory.
Army was held to its lowest

score all season. The New York
writers were amazed at the ef-
fectiveness of Crisler's two pla-
toons. From that point on, Mich-
igan became the pace-setter in
the new style of football.
Much of the success of the great
1947 national champion Michigan
team was traced to the two-pla-
toon system which encouraged the
specialist. Crisler called his 1947
squad "A crowd," and the football
review said of Michigan's team,
"A collection of chrome-plated,
hand - tooled specialists which
probably constituted the greatest
football team of modern times."
* * *
A LOOK at the approaching sea-
son shows that Michigan, the
school which prospered so much
under the two-platoon system, will
not be hurt in the least by the
return to the old style of play.
Even in the days of the spec-
ialist, Michigan players were
trained to play on both offense
and defense. This was done in
case of injuries to key players.
For example, last season fullback
Dick Balzhiser was used almost
exclusively on offense, but he
spent many practice hours learn-
ing how to play defensive half-
back in case the occasion would
ever arise when he would be
needed in that capacity. It was
this idea of training everyone in
both phases of the game that is
now paying off for the varsity.
At many schools where separate
teams were used for offense and
defense, and where the practice
sessions were devoted to only one
phase of the game, there exist
some real problems. A great ball-
carrier may find himself on the
bench, playing second string to a
man who, though not quite as
adept at offensive football, is a
much better defensive performer.

AT EAST LANSING, Jim Ellis,
the Spartans' great safetyman,
who was heretofore only in the
game on defense, has been install-
ed at halfback, where he must now
play both ways. Fortunately for
Biggie Munn, and unfortunately
for Michigan State's opponents,
Ellis seems to be better on offense
than he was on defense, if such a
thing is possible.
Some coaches may not be as
lucky as Munn, and may have to
start a mediocre player who does
everything adequately in pref-
erence to a star passer who can-
not, for example, play defense,
In most cases however, the good
players will pick up the neces-
sary fundamentals to go both ways.
Condition will count this season
as never before. In the final analy-
sis the teams with sufficient depth
will still be able to use it to wear
down less fortunately endowed op-
ponents. A coach can start his
third string, if it is good enough
then follow it with his second
team, and when the opposition is
weakened throw in his first string
to score on the tired adversary.
This is reminiscent of the old
"shock troop" method employed by
Knute Rockne at Notre Dame in
the post World War I era.
The new rule is not going to
change the game of football as
we know it. There will still be good
plays and bad, and the crowds that
pack the stadia around the nation
this autumn will enjoy thle game
every bit as much as in recent
years.
The new rule has simply taken
football off the assembly line and
put it back where it belongs-in
the hands of the men who play
the game no matter which team
has possession of the ball.

LOST THURSDAY-Lavendar wallet be-
tween University High School and 318
E. Jefferson. Reward. Call 2-1542.
FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.00. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One wool rug $65. Two large walnut
veneer buffets, $15 each. One small
folding steel cot $10.00. Large daven-
port with green leatherette, $15. Two
doll high chairs, $2.50 each. Phone
2-9020.
CANARIES and Parakeets. Bird supplies
and cages. 526 S. Seventh at W. Mad-
ison. Mrs. Louise Ruffins.
FOR SALE-1948 4-door English Austin.
Good tires and body, rebuilt motor.
An excellent, economical car. Call
2-6520 after 6:00.
SELECTION of pieces from personal col-
lection of Japanese laquer boxes, trays,
.brocade, dolls, prints, frames and por-
celain. Afternoons and evenings, 2388
Pinecrest Rd., Pittsfield Park. 3-0939.
PHONOGRAPH-Portable 3-speed, Web-
ster-Chicago changer with Newcomb
amplifier. For the music lover who
wants better tone and fidelity with
more power than the usual portable
phonograph. Original price, $130. Only
$85. Completely guaranteed. Ann Ar-
bor Radio & T.V., 1215 So. Univ. Ph.
7942.
BEAUTIFUL Canadian Beaver Coat.
Size 14-16. Original cost over $1,000.
Worn only a few months. Leaving for
Florida July 30. Will sell1for best offer
over $295. Ph. 2-3541.
Daily Classifieds
Bring QuiC Results

FOR SALE
WASHING WASHINE-Small table top
type. Perfect shape. Only $17.50. Ann
Arbor Radio. 1215 So. Univ. Ph. 7942.
FOR RENT
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
1iam St. Phone 3-8454.
DELUXE Bachelor Apt. Private entrance.
Semi-private bath. Between Ypsi and
Ann Arbor. $67.50 a month. Ph. 2-9020.
PERSONAL
IS YOUR LIFE worth 8c these scorching
days? Subscribe now-$4 a year. Phone
Student Periodical, 6007.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time, Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, FinisheddWork, and Hand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable,
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street.
3-4449.
RADIO-PHONO SERVICE
" Fast-In Today, Ready Tomorrow
" Reasonable Rates-Guaranteed Service
" Phonos & Auto Radios Our Specialty
" New & Used Radios & Phonos
" Custom Auto Radios at Reduced Price
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
1215 So. University Ph. 7942
TYPING -- Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
REAL ESTATE
HOMESITES-On Huron River Dr., 5
mi. west Ann Arbor in hilly, wooded
area overlooking Huron River. Write
Frank Offer, 1710 Seaborn, Detroit 14,
Phone Lorain 7-1495.

RED SCHOENDIENST, St. Louis Cardinal second baseman, holds
a towel to his face as he is helped from Polo Grounds playing
field on July 22 after being hit by thrown ball while beating out
an infield hit. He is assisted by Dr. Anthony Palermo, Giant
club physician, who is talking to Card outfielder Peanuts Lowrey
at left. Assisting at right is Cardinal outfielder Dick Sisler.
Miulich, Wilson Try for Net
Title inDetroit Championships
By TOM' FABIAN
I t n ct h M1iknli h fnm

i

Bill Mikulich and Tom Wilson
will team up in their quest of the
doubles title of the Detroit City
Championships, when they take to
the court of their final match at
the swank West Side Tennis club
this afternoon.
Scheduled for 2 p.m., the finals
will see the Wolverine duo oppose
Jim Bicknell and Jerry Gurman.
The match will be the feature
event of the day duo to the com-
pletion of the singles competition
last week.
LEONARD BROSE displayed aj
brilliant, well-balanced game as he
defeated Jim Bicknell to win the
singles title last Sunday after-
noon.
In their semi-final victory the
Mikulich - Wilson . combination'
showed the fans a superb net
game as well as brilliant back-
court strategy as they defeated
Angell and Potter in a close
match.
After dropping the first set 6-4,
they came back to win the sec-
ond set 8-6. With the score tied
PERSONALITY
HAIR STYLING
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
Featuring * Latest Creations
* 8 Artists
* No Waiting
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre
eLctton. n odern Cootl.n! c

au one seL eac , irun , orm -
er Big Ten doubles title holder and
Wilson, co-winner of the. 1951 De-
troit doubles crown showed their
best stroking of the day as they
captured the next two sets to en-
ter the finals.
Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

GOLDEN APPLE'S
RESTAURANT
BREAKFAST at 7:00
LUNCH at 11:30
DINNER to 9:00
TOWER HO'TEL
' RESERVATIONS Phone 2-4531

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Brooklyn
Milwaukee
Philadelphia
New York
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh

W
59
54
51
48
49
42
32
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L
33
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57
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STARTS TODAY
Prices This Attraction Only
MATINEE - 60c EVENINGS - 80c
CHILDREN, All Times, 35c

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Milwaukee 11, Brooklyn 6
New York 3, Cincinnati I
Chicago 7 Pittsburgh I
Philadelphia 2, St. Louis I
TODAY'S GAMES
Milwaukee at Brooklyn
Chicago at Pittsburgh
Cincinnati at New York
St. Louis at Philadelphia (night)
AMERICAN LEAGUE

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20th Century-FX 's
Major Bid for
1950 Academy
Awards!I
-TIME MAGAZINE

7

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New York
Chicago,
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
Philadelphia
Detroit
St. Louis

w
61
57
55
53
44
38
32
33

L
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36
40
39
50
54
60
63

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.576
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.348
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hen you See...

i

Hans Christian Andersen

ENDS TONIGHT

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 5, New York 1
Washington 6 Cleveland 4
Boston 8-6, St. Louis 0-0
Philadelphia 4, Chicago 2
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Detroit
Philadelphia at Chicago
Boston at St. Louis
Washington at Cleveland
GOLFERS
Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
-21/2 miles out Washte-
now - right on U.S. 23
for 1 mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10 A.M. - 11 P.M.

-

11

Darryl F. Zanuck presents
BETTE DAVIS
ANNE BAXTER
GEORGE SANDERS
CELESTE HOLM

I
i

"
Ending Tonight
George Raft
"OUT POST
in
MOROCCO"
Starting Sunday
First Showing

1, A060M MI; W ' Z ill,

° '::.;+ !"""'"_.. '°' gal

,. ,w o. v., , , R . a T~aa ~ i to &AI ilihI y't" humbelina" c

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