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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 25, 1952 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PA OX SEVEN*

WEDNESDAY,

JUNE 25, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

if

f

'M'Looks

for

New

* * *

Successor to Ernie McCoy
Will Be Named by Crisler
nS

Hoop Coach
Departing Court Mentor
Ends Long Association

I1

go-

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L. -

FABRIC SHOES

Completely
Genuine

By BOB MARGOLIN
The big question on the Michi-
gan sports scene is who will re-
Place Ernie McCoy as head coach
of the Wolverine basketball team.
McCoy resigned two weeks ago
to accept a position at Penn State
as athletic director and head of
the physical education department
there.
* * *
MICHIGAN'S athletic director
H. 0. (Fritz) Crisler, who returns
today from a football clinic at
Boulder Springs, Col., is expected
to name McCoy's successor in the
near future, possibly this week.
His desk is cluttered with ap-
plications from several coaches,
among them Clair Bee, former
coach of the scandal-wrecked
Long Island University quintet.
Bee, whose integrity has never
been questioned, is attempting
to get back into the game.
According to publicity man Les
Etter, however, first crack at the
- job will go to present members
of the Michigan athletic staff. Next
in line for the job will be any
graduates of Michigan who are
now in the coaching profession.
This means that men like Frank
Cappon, successful Princeton
coach, could have the job for the
asking.
* * *
IF NO ONE from either of those
groups is appointed, then Crisler
will have to resort to the applica-
tions on his desk or else do a little
recruiting before he makes his
final decision.

McCoy also served as assistant
athletic director and head foot-
ball scout, but his court succes-
sor will devote full time to the
handling of basketball affairs.
Since the position of assistant
athletic director was created back
in 1947 when Crisler was burdened
with the dual jobs of head football
coach and chief athletic adminis-
trator, there is a possibility that
Crisler may choose to abolish that
-office, at least for the time being.
It may also be a long time, be-
fore Crisler picks another football
scout to replace McCoy, who for
several years has been considered
one of the finest in the Big Ten.

' Ernie McCoy, who leaves Michi-
gan to take over as head man in
the Penn State athletic system
August 1, is ending many years
of association with the University.
As an undergraduate he won
the coveted "M" in both basket-
ball and baseball. In his sopho-
more year he played on a diamond
squad that won undisputed cham-
pionship of the Big Ten and two
years later he coptained a team
that tied with Wisconsin for
league honors.
* * *
AFTER RECEIVING his degree
from Michigan, McCoy earned a
Master's in physical education at

ERNIE McCOY
. . . farewell to Michigan

ATHLETICS FOR ALL:
Complete IM Sports Program Set

Columbia University. He later be-
came athletic director and head
coach at State Teachers' College
in Montclair, N.J. and then took
the same position at Montclair
High School.
In 1940 McCoy returned to
his Alma Mater, serving as as-
sistant on the coaching staff.
World War Two brought this
visit to a sudden halt, however,
and McCoy soon found himself
serving in the Navy as an ath-
letic officer.
Upon his return to Ann Arbor,
McCoy was "kicked upstairs." He
was named assistant athletic dir-
ector to H. 0. (Fritz) Crisler, who
was doubling as head football
coach at the time.
* *i *
WHEN Ozzie Cowles left Michi-
gan in 1948 to take charge of the
Minnesota basketball coaching
duties, McCoy was named to take
over the Wolverine reigns.
Despite the fact that he is a
shrewd observer of individual
athletic talent-he was one of
the best football scouts in the
Big Ten-McCoy did not have
too much luck as a hardwood
mentor.
His first team captured third
place in the Big Ten race, but
since then the results have been
less encouraging. His overall
league record is 18 wins and 34
losses. Last season his young
team, which occasionally showed
flashes of brilliance, could only
garner four wins in 14 starts.
McCoy's successor as Michigan
court mentor has not yet been
named.

+ FADED BLUE
* NAVY
NATURAL
* GOLD
Sizes
to
13

By IVAN KAYE
A well rounded program of in-
tramural sports is on tap for
Michigan's summer students, ac-
cording to Assistant I-M Sports
Director Rod Grambeau.
There will be both individual
and team competition with the
faculty and students appearing in
the same leagues. An outstanding
feature of this summer's individual
tournaments will be the double
elimination in place of the cus-
tomary single elimination which
is used during the regular school
year.
THE INDIVIDUAL competition

GREENBERG GARDENS:
Pirate Players Ask Removal

Of Close Left
BOSTON-(P)-The last place
Pittsburgh Pirates decided to ask
the club to remove "Greenberg
Gardens"-the home-run hitting
paradise at Forbes Field in Pitts-
burgh.
The* players requested Howie
Pollet, their representative, to
convey their wishes to general
manager Branch Rickey when the
Bucs return to Pittsburgh Friday.
* . *s
"WE'VE BEEN losing too many
games when players on other
teams dump fly balls into those
bullpens," Pollet said as he dis-
cussed "Greenberg Gardens" --
named after Hank Greenberg.
"That fence is doing other teams
in the league a. lot more good
than it does the Pirates."
The fence to which Pollet re-
ferred was erected 30 feet in
front of the Pirate scoreboard in
left field back in 1947 when
Greenberg came to the Pirates
from the Detroit Tigers. Origin-
ally the fence was eight feet
high all along its length to left-
center field but before the 1948
season it was increased to 16
feet.
Without. the fence, the distance
from home plate to left field is
365 feet. With it, a home run
hitter only .has to smash the ball
335 feet.
THIS YEAR Pirate sluggers
have dropped 16 homers into the
"Gardens" while their National
League opponents have collected
21.
(In Pittsburgh Rickey could not
be reached for comment.)

Field Target
Meanwhile, the Pittsburgh Post-
Gazette-which has kept statistics
on the "Garden" homers-said the
Pirates actually have hit more
than their opponents. The Post-
Gazette said the Bucs have smash-
ed 231 "Garden" circuit clouts
while the combined opposition
garnered 225.
A team spokesman said Ralph
Kiner, the home run hitter of the
Bucs, voted in favor of remov-
ing the fencedespite the fact that
64 of the 246 homers he has hit
at Forbes Field have been of the
"Garden" variety.
Varsity Courts
*Open to Public
This Summer
The varsity tennis courts on
Ferry Field will be open to the
public during the summer session,
outgoing assistant athletic director
Ernie McCoy announced yester-
day.
An attendant will be on duty
from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. seven days
a week.
To defray the maintenance of
the clay courts a charge per
hour of play will be necehsary,
he said. The fee is sixty cents
per person for singles and forty,
cents per person for doubles.
The asphalt courts on Palmer
and Ferry Field will be open to
students at all times without
charge.

is slated to begin the week of
July 7, and entries should be in
by July 5. There will be tourna-
ments in badminton, golf, hand-
ball, horseshoes, paddleball and
both singles and doubles tennis.
Team competition will be of-
fered in softball, basketball, and
if entries are received, in volley-
ball.
As during the regular year,
there will be a co-recreational
program each Friday night ex-
cept the Fourth of July. Both
students and faculty are invited
to these programs which last
from 7:30 until 10 o'clock.
With the summer promising to
be a scorcher, I-M Director Earl
Riskey has announced that the
Intramural pool will be open to
students Monday through Friday
from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Sat-
urday mornings from 9:00 to
11:30. The faculty will use the
pool Monday through Friday from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
*' * *
LAST SUMMER'S badminton
champion Frank Scott is back on
Entries for summer session
IM softball are now being ac-
cepted. All interested individ-
uals or team captains please
phone 8109 before the June 28
deadline.
--Don Robinson
campus for the current session and
appears ready to defend his title.
Other trophy winners in last
season's individual competition
include: Bob Caton in golf, Sid
Harmon in handball, Robert
Revis in horseshoes, Barry
Driggers in paddleball, Marty
Dekker in singles tennis and
Bill Wait and Tom Ungerleider
in doubles play.
Team champions last season
were: Sigma Chi in softball and
basketball and Fletcher Hall in
volleyball.
Softball contests will be held
Tryout call!
Future Grantland Rices can
gain valuable experience in all
phases of sports writing and edit-
ing on the sports staff of The
Michigan Daily.
Men interested in taking ad-
vantage of the opportunities of-
fered on a small informal staff
are urged to report to The Daily
tryout meet tonight at 7:30 in
the Student Publications Building
on Maynard Street, one block
west of State Street.

Rolfe Moves Art Houtteman
To Status of Relief Thrower

at 6:30 p.m. on the I-M fields.
Basketball games will be played
in the gymnasium of the Intra-
mural Building at 4:30 p.m.
Proof of the high caliber of
competition in these summer
session sports is shown by the
fact that last season Barry
Driggers :captured the paddle-
ball championship by besting
Lowell Emerly, who was the all-
campus title-holder during the
regular year.
Rounding out the very efficient
Intramural summer sports staff
behind Director Riskey and As-
sistant Director Grambeau are:
Newt Loken, Dennis Rigan, Don
Robinson and Ed Olds.

MAST'
619 East Liberty St.

DETROIT-M)-Ex-soldier Art
Houtteman's tale of heartbreak
and hard luck picked up a new
chapter yesterday when manager
Red Rolfe demoted the Detroit
Tiger righthander to the role of
a relief pitcher.
Art, fresh out of the army, had
been expected to lead the Tigers
in contention for a first division
berth this season.
BUT WITH the season nearly
half gone the Tigers are buried in
the American League cellar and
Houtteman-first pitcher in the
league to lose 10 games-is buried
in the bullpen.
Rolfe hopes both are tempor-
ary situations.
"What's wrong with Houtte-
man?" is a question you hear
in this. town almost as much as
"What's wrong with the Tigers?"
Art, stumbling along with a gen-
erous 4.71 earned run average, has
been driven off the pitching mound
in the last nine games. He has
won three games and lost 10.
Houtteman, handsome,24-year-
old youth from Detroit, grins at
questioners. "Things will get bet-
ter," he says.
* * *
ROLFE ANNOUNCED his deci-
sion to put Art in the bullpen with
these words: "The boy needs a
rest. This is only temporary. May-
be I can put him into a ball game
when we're behind and if he can
win it, maybe that will help."
Coach Rick Ferrell, once a big
league catching star, has an ex-
planation for Art's pitching woes:
"His control is a little off.
He's not wild as far as walking

men or throwing the ball away.
But he can't put the ball just
where he wants it. When he's
pitching to a batter's weakness
the ball wanders a little and
the batter's got a hit."
Some fans think Art's troubles
are partly caused by preoccupa-
tion with the sudden death of his
only child in an auto accident this
spring-but there is no evidence
to prove or disprove such a con-
tention.
Art seems cheerful enough and
laughs at those who would call
him "Hard Luck" Houtteman.
Some folks gave him that nick-
name after the following occur-
rences: 1-He won 2 and lost 16
games in 1948 despite some im-
pressive pitching; 2-He was near-
ly killed in auto accident in Lake-
land, Fla., during the 1949 spring
training; 3-His baby daughter's
death; 4 - His performance on
April 26 this year when he had a
no-hitter with two outs in the
ninth inning only to see Harry
Simpson of Cleveland single into
left field.
In 1950, the season before he
went into the army, Art won 19
games.
Collegiate Cuts
to please
7 BARBERS
NO WAITING
The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

Campus Store Only

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