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July 17, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-17

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/

THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1957

THE.MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

____________________________________________________________ _

WAGE THREE

SPORTS REPORTS
By BOB MARGOLIN, Co-Sports Editor
TWAS WITH much enthusiasm that this writer read in this week's
issue of the Sporting News of a proposed world-circling good will
tour by the Brooklyn Dodgers and Cleveland Indians at the close of
the regular major league season.
The idea is certainly not new. Way back in 1888 A. G. Spald-
ing took a group of twenty ballplayers on a globe-wide trek that
lasted six months. In every aspect, including financial, the trip
was a success. The next such voyage didn't come until 24 years
later when fiery John McGraw and adventerous Charley Com-
iskey led a crew composed of New York Giants and Chicago White
Sox plus a few other ballplayers on an extremely profitable globe-
circling venture.
Since then, there have been no circuit trips by American baseball
teams, although several expeditions, too numerous to mention here,
have brought the game of baseball to Europe, the Far East and Latin
America. Even the University of Michigan has sent teams. to Japan on
more than one occasion under the leadership of its present great dia-
mond coach, Ray Fisher.
HOWEVER, THE proposed Dodger-Indian tour, if taken, will be
in many respects different from its two predecessors. For one thing,
the size of the party will be considerably larger than in the past. Two
squads of 17 or 18 ballplayers plus wives, officials and sports writers
will add up to approximately 130 people.
The enormity of the group leads us'to a conclusion already
accepted by the promoters. Although it would be nice to realize
a profit on the venture, chances are that they will probably
take a loss. ,Certainly, it is doubtful if the promoters expect to
make the huge profit a businessman would anticipate consider-
Ing the financial risks involved and the estimated expense of
$500,000.
All of which brings us to the reason why, with a little encourage-
ment here and there, it is believed that, officials of the Dodgers and
Indians will go ahead with the trip despite the expense.
* * * *
IT CAN BE summed up by using either side of a two-headed coin
-good will or propaganda-depending on which term you prefer to
use. With a tentative schedule that includes Hawaii, Japan, Australia,
x the Philippines, India, Spain, Portugal, Greece, North Africa, Israel
and Central America, many of the parts of the world where a delicate
cold war exists between the proponents of totalitarianism and demo-
cracy will be visited.
Little wonder, then, that the State Department is solidly be-
hind the tour. The past experience of two such ventures has prov-
ed that they bring this nebulous thing called good will not only to
the game of baseball but to the United States as well. And, as the
Sporting News pointed out, "the presence of Jackie Robinson,
Roy Campanella, Larry Doby and other Negro players on the
squads would serve to combat communistic propaganda that ra-
cial minorities are discriminated against and denied equality of
opportunity in the United States."
Moreover, it is this writer's opinion that one shining example is
worth ten thousand words of propaganda. The game of baseball, even
when played by professionoals, is as American, to use the cliche, as
ham and eggs, apple pie or a "car in every garage and a chicken in
every pot."
* * * *
OF OUR BALLPLAYER'S actions on and off the field we have no
fear. As an example of American individualism and competition, co-
operatioon and democracy at work, we can think of nothing more
vivid save a New England town meeting, nothing more enjoyable to
witness save a Walt Disney cartoon.
Most of the players involved are willing to make the 35,000
* mile, two month trip; the State Wepartment is wholeheartedly
behind it (although Cleveland and Brookly will foot the ex-
penses); and many foreign governments have already indicated
their desire to be included on the itinerary.
At the risk of being accused of attempting to spend someone else's
money, this writer feels that Messrs. O'Malley of the Dodgers and
Greenberg and Ryan of Cleveland would be hitting a bases loaded
home run for a more positive dramatization of democracy by going
through with their present tentative plans.

Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

CLASSIFIEDS
I II ROOMS FOR RENT

W L
New York ..51 32
Cleveland ...47 37
Boston......46 37
Chicago ....47 40
Washington .44 38
Philadelphia 36 40
St. Louis ...34 51
Detroit .....26 56

Pct.
.614
.560
.554
.540
.537
.474
.400
.317

GB
41/2
5
6
6%
11%/
18
241/

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 8-7, Cleveland 7-4
Detroit 9, Washington 0
Boston 7, Chicago 3
St. Louis at Philadelphia (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
DETROIT at Washington
(night) - Newhouser (3-5) vs.
Josnson (0-2)
Cleveland at New York (2-
twinight)-Garcia (13-6) and
Gromek (4-3) vs. Reynolds (11-
4) and Raschi (9-2)
Chicago at Boston-Grissom
(7-4) vs. Trout (5-7)
St. Louis at Philadelphia-

(night) - Garver (5-8)

RHYTHM DURING OLYMPICS PRACTICE-Jack Davis (left) of Glendale, California, and Harri-
son Dillard (right) of Cleveland, Ohio, clear the hurdles together as they work out at Helsinki,
Finland, in preparation for the 15th Olympiad which opens on July 19.
SCubs3 B raves To Snap Loss Streak;
Yankees Take Twvin Bill from Indians

Shantz (15-3)
NATIONAL'
W
Brooklyn ...54
New York ...51
St. Louis ...48;
Chicago ....44
Philadelphia 39
Cincinnati ..35
Boston.....34
Pittsburgh ,..231

LEAGUE
L Pet.
22 .711
29 .638
37 .565
39 .530
42 .481
48 .422
48 .415
63 .267

vs.
GB
5
10?z
131
181/
22 /
23
36

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST--Gray Kitten in vicinity of East
William and Thompson. Call No. on
his tag or bring to 512 E. William,
Back apt.
FOR SALE
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, 1 arm Windsor, 1 comb
back Windsor. 1 tilt top table. Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710.
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 19f2 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.
FRATERNITY or sorority house for
rent, approved for twenty-five. Close
to campus. Write Box 17.
AVAILABLE -- A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month. Will rent for
summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homesx
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125a month. Also single room. 320 E.
Washington after 4 P.M.
SINGLE ROOM, cooking & laundry
privileges for girl; call 312 S. Thayer
after 6 P.M.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main.
MENS' USED BIKES and used radios.
Ann Arbor Radio & T.V. 1215 So.
Univ., Ph. 7942. 1;1 blocks east of
East Engineering.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1%,i blocks east of East Engin.
TRANSPORTATION
MAN WITH CAR wants man for trip-
Quebec, Gaspe, etc. July or August,
Share Exp. G. 514 So. Forest. Phone
2-7128.
TO CALIFORNIA; Aug. 15, return E$ept.
17. Share expense. Phone 5539.
MICHIGAN'S
ULTRA MODERN
SHOP
AIR CONDITIONED
6 Barbers
Special Attention Given
Ladies' & Children's Hair Cutting
U of M BARBERS
715 N. University
T.V. For Your Enjoyment

<";

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO-The Chicago Cubs,
beaten 21 times in the past 30
games over a month's span, snap-
ped a five-game losing streak
when Manager Phil Cavarretta
smashed a one-out single in the
thirteenth inning to give the
Bruins a 3-2 victory over the Bos-
ton Braves yesterday.
Cavarretta's ninth hit in 21
games this season sent Tommy
Brown across the plate witli the
winning run. Brown singled off
Lew Burdette after catcher John
Pramesa grounded out. Hal Jeff-
coat walked, and Burdette was re-
placed by Chipman. Cavarretta
took a called strike and then hit
Chipman's second pitch sharply
to center for a game-winning
single.
CAVARRETTA'S fireworks also
snapped a five-game winning
streak for the Braves, managed by
Charlie Grimm, Phil's former pro-
fessor when he broke in with the
Cubs way back in the middle
thirties.
The three hour and 15 minute
match started out as a tight
pitching duel beteween Warren
Spahn and Johnny Klippstein.
The Cubs scored a run in the
first inning, Bob Addis getting
across on Pramesa's two out
single.
Chicago carried this 1-0 edge
into the eighth when Boston tied
it up.
THE BRAVES grabbed a 2-1
lead in the ninth, but Chicago
made it 2-2 in the home half as
Brown, running for Dee Fondy,
who smashed a leadoff single, got
around on Jeffcoat's sacrifice, and

Bruce Edwards' pinch single bat-
ting for Klippstein.
Dutch Leonard took over at
thestart of the tenth and check-
ed the Braves on three singles
the rest of the way to receive
credit for his second payoff.
Spahn exited in the tenth when
the Cubs loaded the bases with
one out on two walks sandwiched
around Hank Sauer's double. Bur-
dette came aboard to mop up by
The summer session in co-
operation with the Men's Phys-
ical Education Department is
offering a free golf clinic to
anyone interested. The first
meeting will be at the Univer-
sity Golf Course tonight at 7
p.m. Sessions will also be held
Monday and the following
Thursday, also at 7 p.m.
-Bert Katzenmeyer
getting both Brown and Jeffcoat
to prolong the match before the
Cubs bounced to square the series
at a game apiece.
YANKS 8-7, INDIANS 7-4
NEW YORK-Kal Segrist and
Tommy Gorman made auspicious,
Major League debuts yesterday as
the New York Yankees swept a
doubleheader from Cleveland, 8-7
and 7-4, to increase their first
placeamargin over the Indians to
four and a half games.
Segrist, brought up from the
[Yankees' Kansas City farm along
withGorman Tuesday, scored the
winning run in the first game af-
ter singling to open up the last
half of the 10th inning. The 21-
year-old second baseman advanc-
ed to second on a sacrifice, to
third on a wild pitch and crossed

the plate on Hank Bauer's line
single to center.
GORMAN WAS called upon to
relieve starter Bill Miller in the
seventh inning of the nightcap
with the Yankees leading 3-2, the
bases full of Indians and nobody
out. The 26-year-old righthander
whipped a third strike over on
Bobby Avila, got Dale Mitchell to
hit a force play grounder that sent
in the tying run and then fanned
the dangerous Al Rosen on three
pitches.
The Yankees bounced back
with four runs in their half of
the seventh. Bob Feller, the vic-
tim of the assault, went down to
his eighth defeat against seven
victories. Gorman was credited
with his first Major League win.
The world champions fought an
uphill battle to take the opener. A
home run by Yogi Berra with a
teammate on base and two out in
the eighth inning tied the score
at 7-7 and forced the game into
overtime. The blow came off Mick-
ey Harris.
Harris had taken over in the
seventh after starter Bob Lemon
had been forced out by wilting 95
degree temperature.
Close Games
Ii ohlig ht I-NI
SoftballPlay
Two superbly pitched games
featured yesterday's I-M softball
card.
In the first contest the Bartend-
ers, behind the three-hit pitch-
ing of Bill Rogers shut out the
Jokers, 1-0. Bill Hainsworth al-
lowed the winners only three hits
but gave up a run in the last of
the sixth. Each pitcher faced
twenty-one batters, and each
struck out eight. Both sides com-
mitted one error in what was an
exceptionally close ball game.
THE OTHER sterling pitchers'
battle saw Van Tyne down Fletch-
er by a 1-0 score. Deil Wright
gave but two hits for the winners.
Pitcher Jerry Arend allowed Van
Tyne only three safeties, but two
of them came in the first inning
and produced the game's only run.
The defeats were the first for
both the Jokers and Fletcher.
All four clubs will be in the
playoffs.
In other softball action last
night: Social Research beat Chem-
istry "B", 10-6; Zeta Psi drubbed
Scott, 12-5; and the Air Force
won on a forfeit from Delta Signia
Phi.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 7
Chicago 3, Boston 2
Brooklyn 5, Cincinnati 3
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Cincinnati-Roe
(70-) vs. Perkowski (7-6)
New York at St. Louis (night)
-Lanier (4-4) vs. Presko (5-4)
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (2)
--Meyer (6-10) and Drews (5-9)
vs. Hogue (0-0) and Main (2-8)
Boston at Chicago-Bickford
(4-9) vs. Minner (9-4)
Lions To Try
Former High
SchoolPlayer
DETROIT-P)-Joe Mlinarich,
a Johnstown, Pa., high school
guard who never played college
football, will get a trial with the
Detroit Lions of the National Pro-
fessional Football League this
year.
In recent years only a few high
school players made the jump
without college experience.
Mlinarich, 225-pound six foot-
er, picked up some experience
during his just- ended four years
in the army.
The Lions signed him when they
learned he was named to the 1951
All-Army team and had beaten
out Clayton Tonnemaker, 1949
All-American from Minnesota for
the honor.
Mlinarich, 23, was a sergeant in
reconnaisance cavalry. He gradu-
ated from high school in 1946.
Playing
Friday and SQturday
"A HOODLUM
EMPIRE"
with
* BRIAN DONLEVY
* CLAIRE TREVOR
- and -
"GUYS & GALS"
with
GEORGE & BERT
BERNARD

Gihepa S Lqud
presents
REX HARRISON
in
"THlE14105
ANtI MRS. MUIR"
A prim widow and the ghost of a salty sea captain indulge
in a strange and hilarious romance.
" A jolly film"-N.Y. TIMES
GENE wt GEORGE
TIERNEY th SANDERS
DIRECTED BY JOSEPH MANKIEWICZ
(All About Eve; Letter To Three Wives)
Also
TECHNICOLOR
CARTOON FESTIVAL
4 - WARNER BROS. MERRIE MELODIES - 4
starring
BUGS BUNNY
DANGEROUS DAN McFOO
DAFFY DUCK
PORKY PIG
FRIDAY & ARCHITECTURE
SATURDAY 0AUDITORIUM
7:15 and 9:30 (Opposite Bus.
Ad. Bldg.),
Starting Times:
Cartoon Festival 7:15, 9:30-Ghost & Mrs. Muir 7:45, 10:00

COOL

COOL

TODAY & FRIDAY

DID YOU KNOW: that the ap-
proaching football season will be
the seventy-fourth for the Univer-
sity of Michigan. The Wolverines
were the first in the West to ex-
periment with the gridironsport
when they engaged Racine College
at the old White Stockings Park
on May 30, 1879. The Maize and
Blue gridders were victorious that
day by a score of 7 goals to 2 goals.
The boys from Ann Arbor liked
the game so much that they came
back for more in the following
autumn, shutting out Racine in a
return match 1 goal to' nothing,

Vander Meer Continues in Rut
After 20 Seasons in Baseball

TICKET SALE
for
Dept. of Speech
Plays g
July 23-26
"Winterset"

NEW YORK-(A)-Johnny Van-
der Meer said last spring he fig-
ured this would be his last season
as a baseball pitcher, and he's
probably convinced of it now. He's
in a rut.
No hitters, no hitters. Just where
he was 14 years ago. No future in
Davey Wins
Chuck Davey won a unani-
mous ten round decision last
night over Carmen Basilio. In
a previous match Basilio won a
decision over Davey but an ir-
regularity in the referee's score-
card caused the fight to be
called a draw.
it. And not much room for im-
provement, either.
* **
WE CAN SEE him yet standing
in the Tampa Terrace lobby, look-
ing like a matinee idol with his
brown hair rippling back from his

high forehead and regular features
tilted at the right angle to give
thatdaloof, out-of-this-world look.
Not that the personable guy
is a poser. It's his natural man-
ner, and can he help it if he's
handsome?
"WHEN I started out," he said,
"I hoped to play 20 years. This
is the 20th year. It's been a great
20 years, and I'd do it all over
again."
As a guess, that's just what
he's starting out to do. Against
Beaumont Tuesday night he
pitched a no-hit, no-run game,
and that's the Vander Meer of
14 years ago when he first came
up to the Reds.

TRY OUR

Starting Saturday
A MUSICAL
SENSATION!'. ,

By Maxwell Anderson
July 30-Aug. 2-
"Second
Threshold"
By Philip Barry
Aug. 7, 8, 9-1 P-
"The Merry
Wives of
Windsor"
an opera in conjunction
with
"The School of Music"
Admission

r

MICHIGAN,
Today thru Saturday
LOVE, LAUGHS and Legislation
Sin Hectic
--°' °Washington',
Gt LG.. :i t .f: "':}L:KA.

DELUXE SHIRT SERVICE
" SHIRTS WASHED SPARKLING CLEAN
* IRONED TO PERFECTION
* PACKAGED IN OUR FAMOUS
SFIIRT PAX FOR COMPLETE
PROTECTION UNTIL READY
TO WEAR
m * *m K

IM KAHYN RAII. " 1

I

1k

11111

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