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July 16, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JLY 19, 1952

4

Campers Benefit at Fresh Air Camp

S * S s

S S S S

The more than 200 Michigan boys who romp through a summer
mofith at the University Fresh Air Camp aren't the only ones who
benefit from the camp experience.
Since 1939, approximately 50 graduate and undergraduate stu-
dents have had an opportunity to test their sociological and educa-
tional theories as Fresh Air Camp counselors-and earn a maximum
of six hours credit while they're doing it.
THE COUNCELOR'S JOB is a dual one of helping boys from
seven to 14 in social adjustment and making sure that the campers
have a good time in the process.
* Needless to say, the counselors'
day extends far beyond the camp-
ers' nine o'clock taps.
On the activity side, the coun-
selors guide campers through the
gamut of boys' camp projects.
There are four-mile hikes and
.over-night trips, exhausting to
both campers and counselors.
/7 Swimming instructors stand by
while eager campers dog-paddle
across Patterson Lake to earn the
coveted "blue-caps."- Craft-shop
supervisors set out material for
plaster-of-paris molds, lumber
and building apparatus, and jars
of paint and let the campers take
over from there.
THERE SEEMS to be an un-
written policy at the 31-year-old
camp that whenever theories and
children conflict, the children win
INTENT ARTIST out. The daily schedule is kept
flexible, and though "interest pe-
riods" are urged, no camper is
forced into any activity.
Besides counselors, groups of
professional social workers, psy-
chologists, visiting teachers, re-
search workers, religious ex-
perts and others participate in
the camping-counseling pro-
gram.
1 ,Originally set up as a vaca-
tion-opportunity for underprivi-
leged boys from south-eastern
Michigan, the camp took on so-
ciological functions in 1946 when
it was placed in the University's
Institute for Human Adjustment.
Today the Institute and the
University Summer Session pro-
vide for the camp's academic, ad-
ministrative, and maintenance
costs. Remaining costs are paid by
University students' d o n a t io n
drives, by social agencies through
which the boys are sent to camp,
and by alumni donations.
,; w ~Consisting of 26 permanent
' buildings situated on 300 acres of
lakefront forest area, the camp
is located 24 miles northwest of
q Ann Arbor.

0

i

YOUNG CAMPER AIRS PROBLEMS BE-SMEARED YOUNG CRAFTSMAN AT WORK

'4

A DAILY
PHOTO FEATURE
Pictures by Jack Bergstrom
Story by Virginia Voss

ACTIVITIES ARE LEFT BEHIND AS NOON-TIME BELL CALLS CAMPERS TO LUNCH

BOATING IS NEARLY AS POPULAR AS SWIMMING

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