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July 16, 1952 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 1952

I ________________________________________ I

UTOMOBILE AGE:
Harness Shop. Still Survives
* *

By MARGE SHEPHERD
The harness-making business
just isn't what it used to be.
But the D. J. Malloy harness
store on Fourth and Ann Streets
has managed to survive the age
of the automobile and remain the
only old-tradition shop of its kind
in the area.
, * *
OF COURSE the owners-David
and John Malloy-have found it
necessary to supplement their
trade by mending luggage, golf
bags, doing other types of leather
repair, and generally extending
their line to include a wider var-
iety of goods.
In the old days, when the
Malloy brothers' father opened
the shop he was competing with
seven or eight similar stores.
That part of town was different
then, according to John Malloy
who operates the store most of
the time while his 63-year-old
brother does the buying. The lo-
cation was good because it was
in the vicinity of several black-
smith shops.
Securing the stock for the store
isn't as easy as it once was, either.
The salesmen are becoming fewer
and fewer, and the price of leath-
er has risen considerably during
the years, making it harder for
the Malloy brothers to continue
with a limited area of supplies.
The store itself hasn't chang-
ed much since it's opening in
1905. Strips of tanned leather
still hang from the ceiling, per-
vading the room with a distinc-
tive, not unpleasant odor.
Whips, bridles, t r ac e s, dog
chains, leashes and other equip-
ment cover the walls, with elab-
orate hand-made saddles lining
the sides of the shop. Malloy still
has a lot of made to order hand-
work to do, making both western
and English type saddles and oth-
er leather riding equipment.
Convention
Air-Cooling
FoundIllegal
WASHINGTON-(AP)-The Gov-
ernment said yesterday the air
conditioning system in Chicago's
Convention Hall is illegal.
But the Democrats, who'll be
holdinghtheir convention there
next week, need not worry. Uncle
Sam won't turn the cooling sys-
tem off.
The Republicans kept cool -
physically, that is-under the air
conditioning system last week.
S* *
NATIONAL Production Author-
ity officials reported yesterday
that the Union Stockyard and
Transit Company, which owns the
International Amphitheatre, put
in the cooling system without get-
ting government approval for the
materials used, about 40 tons of
steel and 1,100 tons of copper.
NPA compliance officials are
investigating to decide what ac-
tion to take. ,
NPA officials said the stockyard
company applied last February for
permission to install the system,
noting that the building was used
mainly to house livestock exhibits.
The required materials were
reported to be in the hands of
the sub-contractor.
NPA delayed action for a time
and then turned down the request
as being a violation of the ban on
building of amusement and re-
creation facilities.
But meanwhile the company
had gone ahead and put in the
cooling system. That was one rea-
son why the political parties chose
the amphitheatre instead of the
larger Chicago Stadium.

Educators To,
CoiferToday
A counseling and placement
conference in connection with the
University's 23rd annual Summer
Education Conference is scheduled
for 7:30 p.m. today in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
L. C. Mohr, Superintendent of
Schools in South Haven Michi-
gan will discuss "Seriousness of
the Problems in Education: Now
and Later" and Prof. John P.
Wernette of the Business Admin-
istration School will speak on "Fu-
ture Economic Progress in the
United States." The program is
sponsored by the Bureau of Ap-
pointments.
Education Meeting
Slated Next Week
The second annual conference
in Intercultural Education will be
held Monday and Tuesday, July 21
and 22 at the University.
O frno 4-1,mowil xrl 1h'tw ,.n-.

Blood Donors
The Blood Bank of the Uni-
versity Hospital has issued an
urgent call for professional
blood donors.
Those persons who have giv-
en blood professionally may
register at the Blood Bank
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. any week
day, according to Dr. John E.
Orebaugh.
Donors will be notified when
their type of blood is needed,
Dr. Orebaugh said.
Nurses School
Jolns ACSN
The University School of Nurs-
ing is now an active member of
t h e Association of Collegiate
Schools of Nursing.
Rhoda Reddig, director of the
school, said a change from asso-
ciate to active membership follow-
ed the recent revision of the
School of Nursing curriculum.
This change substituted a single
four-year program leading to a
degree for two previous programs,
a three-year course leading to a
diploma in nursing and a five-
year course leading to the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing.
Miss Reddig announced that the
ACSN is nbw being reorganized as
the National League for Nursing
and that the change in type of
membership will make the School
of Nursing a charter member of
the new organization.
Schools with active-membership
in the new organization will be
those offering baccalaureate and
higher degree programs in colleges
and universities.
New Appointment
Marilyn Mason, formerly in-
structor in organ in the School of
Music has been appointed guest
faculty member at Columbia Uni-
versity for the summer session.
Miss Mason has spent the past
year in residence at Union The-
ological Seminary in New York,
doing work toward the Doctorate
of Sacred Music.

Ministers
Told of TV
Influence
The ministry must be ready to
use television as a new way to in-
crease the influence of religion in
the American home, a conference
of ministers held at the University
was told yesterday.
Approximately 50 ministers at-
tending a two-day conference on
how to improve the effectiveness
of their sermons heard visiting
Prof. Stasheff of the speech de-
partment declare that "just put-
ting a microphone on a pulpit
does not make good religious pro-
gramming."
* * *
PROF. STASHEFF has been
television supervisor for the New
York City Board of Education.
While with TV station WPIX in
New York City from 1948 to 1950,
he produced or directed nearly a
hundred religious telecasts. He
will join the University Depart-
ment of Speech faculty this fall.
He told the ministers they
should accept both radio and
television as a challenge to in-
crease their services. But this
will require the mastering of
microphone and camera techni-
ques, the careful preparation of
religious programming instead
of just reproducing church serv-
ices, and the training of per-
sonnel.
The rewards for all of this ef-
fort will be manifold, Prof. Sta-
sheff declared, since both radio
and television can help to achieve
increased community interest in
the church, active participation
by choir and congregation, and
contact with an ever increasing
audience.

CIRUIIFEK

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 overage words to o line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Gray Kitten in vicinity of East
William and Thompson. Call No. on
his tag or bring to 512 E. Wiliam,
Back apt.
FOR SALE
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, 1 arm Windsor, 1 comb
back Windsor. 1 tilt top table. Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710.
WHITE manual sewing machine. Phone
3-1367 after 5:00 p.m.

FOR SALE
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to
subletJuly 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.
ATTRACTIVE roomy apartment for 3
or 4 boys. Near campus. Call 3-1034
evenings, 5201 days.
FRATERNITY or sorority house for
rent, approved for twenty-five. Close
to campus. Write Box 17.
AVAILABLE - A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month. Will rent for
summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
ROOMS FOR RENT
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room. 320 E.
Washington after 4 P.M.
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 8. Main.
MENS' USED BIKES and used radios.
Ann Arbor Radio & T.V. 1215 So.
Univ., Pl. 7942. 1% blocks east of
East Engineering.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home -- Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1%2 blocks east of East Engin.
TRANSPORTATION
MAN WITH CAR wants man for trip-
Quebec, Gaspe, etc. July or August.
Share Exp. G. 514 So. Forest. Phone
2-7128.
TO CALIFORNIA: Aug. 15, return Sept.
17. Share expense. Phone 5539.
Read Daily Classifieds

4,i

Clearance Sale.
ME N'S WINTHROP LOUNGERS

--Daiy-Jack Bergstrom
HARNESS-MAKER KEEPS UP OLD TRADITION
Economic Status of French
Seen as.Bad DespiteU.S. Aid

95

i,

The economic situation of the
average Frenchman is poor despite
our Marshall Plan Aid, according
to Prof. Robert J. Niess of the
French department who returned
from a tour of France several
weeks ago.
Prof. Niess will talk about his
trip at a meeting of Cercle Fran-
cais at 8 p.m. today in the Michi-
gan League. An open discussion
will follow his talk.
"INFLATION has pushed prices
up 30 to 40 per cent," Prof. Niess
commented, "and the budget had
to be cut at the expense of recon-
struction projects. This has stop-
ped home building and intensified
the bad housing situation."
The Creation'
To Be Given
"The Creation" by Joseph
Haydn will be presented at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow at the First Con-
gregational Church by 15 members
of the class in vocal literature in
the School of Music.
Vocal Literature 167, taught by
Prof. Harold Haugh, of the mu-
sic school, is designed and offered
to give students a practical per-
forming acquaintance with 18th
century choral works. Question of
translation, ornamentation and
accompaniment are considered, all
in view of- the demands of public
performance. An endeavor is made
to realize Bach's intentions rathr
than our own contemporary tastes.
The presentation will be offered
not as a finished public perform-
ance but as an open class meeting,
simulating actual performance
conditions. Each member of the
class is responsible for the com-
plete role he is to perform.
h1e

Any massive aid on our part
cannot help the average worker
until the domestic situation is
cleared up, he feels.
The French have a great deal of
respect for Americans as indivi-
duals, Prof. Niess said, but they
regard some of our governmental
policies with distrust. They are
suspicious of a European Army
which includes rearmed German
forces and accuse us of meddling
in the colonial situation.
PROF. NIESS had traveled in
France just. prior to World War
II. "The old calm and tranquility
of that period have disappeared,"
he said, "and life is much more
accelerated-especially in Paris."
On this trip he traveled exten-
sively throughout the countrytand
had a chance to compare the var-
ious living standards. "People in
Paris are best off," he said, "and
everyone except the lower class is
prospering.
"Frenchmen would prefer to
live there even if it is overcrowded,
because Paris is still the cultural
center of the country," he con-
cluded.
Naval Teaching
Aids To Be Shown
Commander Robert A. Noe will
give two demonstrations of naval
training aids at 2 p.m. and again
at 4 p.m. today in Schorling Au-
ditorium, University High School.
Many of the teaching aids
whose use and effectiveness is to
be demonstrated have not pre-
viously been publicly shown.
Commander Noe, who has had
some teaching experience in Peru
and at the University of Dijon in
France, is to give similar demon-
strations of the training aids at
Northwestern University and the
University of Wisconsin.
THE
GHOST
AND
MUIR

This sale includes all Fabric Shoes with
values to $7.95. Most sizes and colors
still available. Our stock is limited so
shop early for best selection.
ALL SALES FINAL!
MAST'IfS
CAMPUS STORE ONLY
619 E. Liberty

Values to $7.95

TICKET SALE
for
Dept. of Speech
Plays
July 23-26--
"Wi nterset"
By Maxwell Anderson
July 30-Aug. 2
"Second
Threshold"
By Philip Barry
Aug. 7, 8, 9-1 1
"The Merry
Wives of
Windsor"
an opera in conjunction
with
"The School of Music"
Admission
1 .20, 90c, 60c
Opera Tickets
1.50, 1.20, .90
Box office open daily 10-5

I

I

Mendelssohn I
Theatre

i

I

Last Times Today
"CLASH BY NIGHT"
- Tomorrow -
LOVE, LAUGHS and Legislation!

I

HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
c .+T~ot:+et^C : ' ..-. ...;: - . " .
LONG
DISTANCEĀ°z
' *
sOIN

SUTMMER
STUDENT
D IRE CTORIE S
Jrust afew left
Only 50Oc
Available at the Bookstores
and at the
Student Publications - ld-f

"WASHINGTON
STORY"

1273 Broadway
Flint, Michigan
16
tes.

Bill
Stevens
Lit. '40
Manager

Phone Flint
Collect 4-168
For Lower
Interstate Ratr

We own, operate and schedule our own fleet of vans
for direct service without transfer.

I

i

1 15 West Liberty Street
Phnnp Ro I;O

.,

1111 1 ;; lill

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