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July 13, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-13

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Y, JULY 13, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THR~EE

_

Tigers

Lose

Third

Straigh t

to

Sox

4 S

Wilson Leads Bosox to 5-4 Victory;
Reynolds Hits, Pitches Yanks to Win

IM SoftballStandings

* * *

e

Dodgers, Giants
# Senators Victors
By The Associated Press
BOSTON-(P)-After driving in
the winning run with a pinch-hit
single in the eighth inning, Archie
Wilson turned in a game-saving
catch in the ninth yesterday as
the Boston Red Sox swept a three-
game series from the last-place
Detroit Tigers, 5-4.
The Red Sox collected four
runs against ex-teammate Bill
Wight in the second, when Clyde
Vollmer bashed a two-on homer.
Sid Hudson gave the Tigers a
run in the third inning and two
more in the fourth, when Steve
Souchock banged his fifth hom-
er of the season after Vic Wertz
had singled.
Then Hudson kept the Tigers
tinder control until the ninth,
which Johnny Groth opened with
a4 infield single. Goth' made
third on Johnny Hopp's pinch-
single that got away from Dom
DiMaggio in center field.
Thereupon Al Benton replac-
ed Hudson and got the side out
at the cost of only one run. The
tying run in the person of Hopp
was on third base when Wilson
ended the game with a sensa-
tional diving catch of ex-Red
Socker Fred Hatfield's sinking
liner to right-center.
In the bottom of the previous
frame, after Hoot Evers doubled
and then became the second out
by getting rundown between third
base and home plate, Wilson bat-
ted for George Schmees and beat
out a slow roller as catcher Sam-
my White dashed in with the win-
ning marker.
YANKS 5, BROWNS 4.
NEW YORK- (P)-Righthan-
der Allie Reynolds knocked in the
winning run with a single in the
11th inning yesterday to give the
New York Yankees a 5-4 victory
over the St. Louis Browns.
The victory helped Reynolds
celebrate the anniversary of his
first no-hitter.
Making his first start since June
29, Reynolds smashed his game-
twinning hit off reliever Satchel
Paige, who had hurled brilliant
ball until the 11th.
* * .
WITH THE bases loaded and
two out, the part-Indian hurler
drove the ball over centerfielder
Jim Rivera's head and Yogi Ber-
ra raced home with the winning
run. It was Reynolds' 11th victory
of the season and his 15th straight
complete game.
The three-hour, nine-minute
struggle was enlivened by a
fight between Clint Courtney,
Brownie catcher, and second
baseman Billy Martin of the
Yanks which resulted in Court-
ney's ejection from the game.
With two out in the eighth in-
ning, Courtney tried to steal sec-
ond and was out by a wide margin
as Martin apparently made a hard
tag on Courtney's face.
M The two exchanged punches and
umpire Bill Summers wa knocked
flat as both teams rushed into the
melee.
* * *
MANAGER Marty Marion club-
bed a three-run homer in the sec-
ond inning and Bob Young fol-
lowed with a solo blast in the next
frame, to give the Browns a 4-0
lead.
However, two-run homers by
Berra, in the third, and Gene
Woodling, in the fourth, knock-
ed out Brownie Stubby Overmire
and tide the score, 4-4.
Paige, relieving Overmire, gave
the crowd of 13,397 a masterful
exhibition of pitching-three hits
from the fourth to the 11th inn-
ing.

Berra opened that inning with
a, hard single to right. With one

ALLIE REYNOLDS
. .. anniversary win
* * *
out, Gil McDougald sacrificed and
both runners were safe when Ber-
ra beat the throw to second base.
Woodling singled off Paige's glove,
filling the bases. Paige then got
pinchhitter Johnny Mize to pop
out, but he couldn't get Reynolds
out.
* * *
DODGERS 12, CUBS 2
CHICAGO - (P) - Brooklyn's
vaunted power asserted itself yes-
terday as the league-leading Dod-
gers smashed out 22 hits to plas-
ter the Chicago Cubs, 12-2.
The carnage was inflicted
despite the absence of two of
the Brooks' best sluggers, cat-
cher Roy Campanella and cen-
ter fielder Duke Snider. Cam-
panella was benched for light-
hitting and Snider rode the
pines because manager Chuck
Dressen wanted to cram as
many righthanded batters as
possible into the lineup against
Cub starter lefty Paul Minner.
Pee Wee Reese, Jackie Robinson
and Gil Hodges led the vicious as-
sault against four Chicago pitch-
ers. Reese pounded out five
straight hits before he retired
in the eighth inning. Robinson
drove home four runs on a homer
and two singles and Hodges chip-
ped in with his 18th homer and
two singles. %
The Cubs were in the ball game
until the sixth inning when the
Dodgers landed on Minner, seek-
ing his 10th victory, for four runs
to take a 7-2 lead.
* * *
INDIANS 5, ATHLETICS 1
PHILADELPHIA-The Cleve-
land Indians, with Bob Lemon
pitching six-hit ball to earn his
Vighth win, walloped the Phila-
delphia Athletics, 5-1, yesterday.
But there was one bright spot
for the A's even in defeat; Ferris
Fain extended his hitting streak
to 24 consecutive games.
Fain's safety, a ninth-inning
double that led to the A's only
run and ruined Lemon's shut-
out, thus epuals the top conse-
cutive game hitting streak
achieved this season by the St.
Louis Cardinals' Stan (The
Man) Musial.
While Lemon was controlling
the A's bats, Cleveland's catcher
Jim Hegan collected two hits off
starter and loser Sad Sam Zoldak
that drove in three runs. Dale Mit-
chell, Indian outfielder, collected
three of Cleveland's eight hits.
* * *
GIANTS 5, REDS 3
CINCINNATI-The New York
Giants, who had lost six of their
last eight games, yesterday picked

on their favorite National League
opponent-the Cincinnati Reds-
for a 5 to 3 victory although they
were weakening at the finish.
It was New York's 11th triumph
in 12 games with Cincinnati this
season.
Max Lanier, who had a string
of 22% scoreless innings broken
by Andy Seminick's home run
in the second frame, had a neat
five-hitter going into the ninth.
The Reds got to him for a pair
of runs, however, on a single,
a force outand Joe Adcock's
S11th home run.
Ted Kluszewski's single brought
Hoyt Wilhelm in to stifle the Red-
leg rally.
SENATORS 2, WHITE SOX 1
WASHINGTON-A disastrous
error by Shortstop Sam Dente led
to two Washington runs and en-
abled the Senators to edge the
Chicago White Sox, 2-1, yester-
day.
Eddie Robinson accounted for
Chicago's run with his 14th homer
in the second inning.
Washington collected only
three hits, all singles, off Chuck
Stobbs and Harry Dorish, but
two of them were delivered in
the payoff fifth inning as Julio
Moreno scattered seven hits to
win his fifth decision.
After Moreno beat out a slow
roller to Dente with two out in
the fifth, Eddie Yost walked. Dente
permitted Jim Busby's grounder
to go between his legs, scoring
Moreno, and J a c k i e Jensen
brought Yost around with a single
to right.
* * *
CARDS 3, PHILLIES 2
ST. LOUIS-Harry (The Cat)
Breecheen bested Russ Meyer in
a thrilling pitching duel yester-
day as the Cardinals defeated the
Phillies, 3 to 2 to take the series,
two games to one.
Brecheen, who had to quit the
game after eight innings because
of the heat, kept six hits well
scattered. The Cat brought his
run of scoreless innings to a close
at 23 when he walked the first
two Phillies in the second inning
and then saw the first of these,
Granny Hamner score on Eddie
Waitkus' long fly.
* * *
BRAVES 5, PIRATES 3
BOSTON-Vern Bickford scat-
tered nine hits as the Braves best-
ed Pittsburgh's Bob Friend yester-
day, 5-3.
Rookie Ed Mathews' two-run
double in the fifth climaxed a
game winning four-run rally.
AP Briefs
ST. PAUL, Minn.-Cary Middle-
coff, the golfing dentist from
Memphis, Tenn., took over the 54-
hole lead in the $15,000 St. Paul
open golf tournament yesterday
with a 16-under-par 200.
* * *
DETROIT-Two rookies and
two veteran players signed con-
tracts with the Detroit Lions of
the National Football League yes-
tarday.
Signed contracts were returned
by center Lavern Torgeson and
guard Dan Rogas, both with the
Lions last season, and lineman
George Summerall and Bob Miller
from Arkansas and Virginia Uni-
versities.
* * * -
PORT HURON, Mich.-Their
sails billowing beautifully, 47 sleek
racing boats streaked up Lake
Huron yesterday in the annual
race from Port Huron to Macki-
nac Island, 242 miles away.
First arrivals are expected at
the island late tonight.
* * *
CHICAGO-Art Larsen and
Dick Savitt smashed through rug-
ged semi-final opponents yester-

day and into the finals of the
National Clay Courts Tennis Tour-
nament at suburban River Forest.
* * -*
YOUNGSTOWN, O.-The Phil-
adelphia Phillies yesterday an-
nounced the signing of Kelvin
Roberts, 17-year-old Detroit out-
fielder, for a bonus in excess of
$15,000 at the completion of a
tryout school conducted here.
PLAYING SUNDAY
/SMOKY"
In Technicolor
with
SrD1F A -KAI A I AV

LEAGUE I
w
Phi Delta Phi .....3
Phi Gamma DIelt ..2
Delts............2
Theta Delta .......1
Phi Kappa Tau ....0
LEAGUE III
W
Fletcher Hall ......3
Van Tyne .........2
Zeta Psi..... 2
Social Research ....1
Chemistry "B" ....1
Scott ............0 3

L
0
1
1
3
3

Pet.
1.000
.667
.667
.333
.000

LEAGUE II
W
Psychology ..........3
Physics .... ..... ,.2
Met.L .b.... ..2
Dental Lab ........2
Chemistry .........1
Pharmacy ..........1
LEAGUE It
W
Jokers .............3
Bar-Tenders ........3
Rod's Boys ........2
Hardrocks .........1
Air Force ..........0
Delta Sigma P. .....0

L
0
2
2
2
2
3
L
0
0
1
2
3
3

Pct.
1.000
.500
.500
.500
.333
.250
Pct.
.1000
1.000
.667
.333
.000
.000

L
0
1
1
2
2

Pet.
1.000
.667
S.667
.333
.333
....000

Five Teams
Undefeated
Five teams remain undefeated
as the Intramural Softball League
moves into its final week of play
tomorrow.
Phi Delta Phi; Psychology,
Fletcher Hall, the Jokers and
the Bartenders all survived the
first two weeks of play in what
IM officials describe as "fairly
evenly matched leagues."
Playoffs to determine a campus
champion will begin one week
from Monday.

RUSSIANS 'PALSY':
1952 Olympics To Open Saturday

HELSINKI - WP) - The 1952
Olympic Games open Saturday be-
fore 70,000 spectators, bringing
the first full scale athletic clash
between Soviet Russia and the
rest of the world.
Whatever may be the political
and economic differences between
Russia and the United States,
however, there has been unprece-
dented fraternizing between their
athletes.
RUSSIAN and American rowing
crews even exchanged boats. Al-
most from the first the Russian
policy here has been "palsy"-ob-
viously dictated from the highest
Russian governnent level.
Russia and the United States
have the two biggest teams
among the 69 nations entered.
In all, 6,500 athletes will com-
pete in the games of the fif-
teenth Olympiad, making them
the biggest ever.
The United States flag was
formally hoisted at noon at the
"free world" Olympic village of
Kaepylae after 327 American ath-
letes and their 100 officials parad-
ed. At almost the same time the
main contingent of tbe Russian
team arrived at the "Iron Curtain"
village of Otaniemi, eight miles
away.
The Russians-220 men and
40 women-came in a luxury
train with a big red star gn its
green locomotive.
"All will go well. We are very
happy to be here," said Nina Dum-
badze, tal ace of the Russian
women's trackteam.
* * * 0
AVERY BRUNDAGE, Chicago
hotel owner and president of the
U.S. Olympic Committee, is the
man generally tabbed to succeed
J. Sigfrid Edstrom as president of
the International Olympic Com-
mittee. Edstrom is retiring be-
cause of age. The election takes
place next week, with Lord David
* * *
Choice of 1960
Games Delayed
HELSINKI-(P)-The selection
of sites for the 1960 Olympic
Games will be delayed three more
years, the Executive Commission
of the International Olympic Com-
mittee decided today.
Thirteen cities have applied
for the 1960 summer games and
five for the winter games that
year. The list for the summer
games includes Detroit, Los
Angeles, Philadelphia, Chicago,
New York, San Francisco, Mi-
neapolis and Monticello, N.Y.,
as well as Buenos Aires, Tokyo,1
Rome, Karachi, and Lausanne,
Switzerland.
Otto Mayer, chancellor of the
I.O.C., said the selection would
be delayed to allow more cities to
bid for the games.
The 1956 winter games will be
held in Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy,
and the 1956 summer games in
Melbourne, Australia.

Burghley of England another
strong possibility.
No action was taken today on
the main issues of contention in
these games. The Olympic ex-
ecutive committee decided to
refer to the full International
Committee, without recommen-
dation, the problem of Germany
and China.
Both Red and Nationalist China
are seeking to compete here and
both have been refused. West Ger-
many's team has been accepted,'
but East Germany has declined to
participate.1
THE ROWING course on Drum-
soie Fjord was the scene of much
fraternizing between Russians and

Americans. The Soviets lent the
Americans a scull, and invited
Russell (Rusty) Callow, head
coach at Annapolis, to ride their
launch.
A new injury cropped up to
plague the American track team.
Jim Fuchs, world record holder in
the shot put, who already had a
sore ankle, sprained a finger of
his right-and putting-hand.
In addition, Norbert Schemensky
of Detroit, world middle-heavy-
weight lifting champion, pulled a
muscle in his right leg. He may
be lost to the team. However,
John Henry Davis, Brooklyn's
world heavyweight lifting king,
left the hospital after treatment
for stomach trouble.

(CLASSIFIEDS
FOR RENT
MICH.IGAN DAILY AVAILABLE - A new 3-room de-
Phone 23-24-1 luxe apartment which accommodates
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M. tour. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING trance. $95 per month. will rent for
RATES summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS ROOMS FOR RENT
2 .60 1.34 1.96 4 STUDENTS-large. spacious 2 bedroom
3 .70 1.78 2.84 furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
4 .90 2.24 3.92 room available for music students.)
Figure 5 average words to a line. $125 a month. Also single room. 320 E.
Classified deadline doily except Washington after 4 P.M.
Saturday Is 3 P.M., Saturdays, OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
11:30 A.M., for Sunday Issue. tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
LOST AND FOUND BUSINESS SERVICES
LOST-Gray Kitten in vicinity of East WASHING, finished work, and hand
William and Thompson. Call No. on ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
his tag or bring to 512 E. William, Buff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
Back apt. ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
FOR SALE TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate,
ART SALE private collection, oils, water Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 8. Main.
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day, MENS' USED BIKES and used radios.
Phone 2-1710. Ann Arbor Radio & T.V. 1215 So.
UECHUniv., Ph. 7942. 1% blocks east of
ANTIUE CAIR - 1Hithcoc. 1 East Engineering.
Thin'- " r ^1arm Windsor, 1 comb_________________
back 1 tilt top table. Mis- RADI " ERV'CE
celaneu~.objects: candle sticks, i. )t.
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph. Auto -- Home - Portable
2-1710. Phono & T.V.
PLYMOUTH 1947 4-DOOR. Excellent Fast & Reasonable Service
PLYMUTH 9474-DOR. xcelent ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
condition. 605 W. Hoover, Apt. 2, Sat- "Student Service"
urday or Sunday. 1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Engin.
FOR RENT ALTERATIONS - Women's garments.
Prompt service. Catherine St. near
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to State. Ph. 2-2678.
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar -_ta__._Ph._2-2_.
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings. H ELP WANTED
ATTRACTIVE roomy apartment for 3 MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell Luminous
or 4 boys. Near campus. Call 3-1034 Name Plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
evenings, 5201 days. boro, Mass., Free Sample and details.
FRATERNITY or sorority house for WANTED-Senior or Grad. student to
rent, approved for twenty-five. Close read for blind student. 85 cents per
to campus Write Box 17. hour. Ph. 22217 after 7 p.m.

Whiting To Face Turner
In Michigan Golf Finals

IT'S LAUNDRY
SERVICE AT
ITS BEST!
Launder Your Summer Cottons
To Sparkling Perfection.

I.

CHARLEVOIX, Mich. - (P) -
Young Dick Whiting of Detroit,
wh started playing golf when
only five, will tackle veteran Fred
Turner of Flint, who waited until
he was 30 to start, in the finals
of the Michigan Amateur Cham-
pionship today.
Both scored dramatic come-
from-behind victories in semi-final
matches this afternoon.
* * *
TURNER, now a 43-year-old
"rrand Trunk Railroad yard clerk,
eliminated Glenn Johnson, Grosse
Ile insurance agent, two and one-
thanks to a pair of 25-foot putts.
Whiting, now a 29-year-old
part owner of a tubular parts
factory, was headed for defeat
with three holes to go.
But he won those remaining
holes for a one-up victory over
Jack Gregory, Wayne University
golf captain from Detroit.
* * *
WITH THE match even going
into the 18,th, Whiting took his
wedge and from 24 feet off the
green, dropped a 66-footer. The
five-foot seven and a half, 150-
pound Whiting once playing on
the Notre Dame golf team and was
a Notre Dame second baseman.
Whiting and Turner will duel
36 holes for the Stag Horn Tro-
phy over Belvedere's hilly ter-
rain. They'll be near even
choices.
Turner will celebrate his 44th
birthday today. The five foot 10
inch, 172-pounder thought golf
was a silly game until he and his
wife. gave it a try in 1938.
YESTERDAY he set the most
blistering pace. In the morning
quarter-final match, the mustch-
ioed Turner was three under par
in eliminating Ray Palmer of
Grosse Ile, four and two.
Against Johnson, he was four
under, getting six birdies and
two bogeys. Johnson himself
was two under.
Turner, aiming to become the
first non-Detroiter to win in six

years, won the first and fifth hole
with 25-foot birdie putts. And he
took the seventh with a par four
when Johnson missed a five-footer.
* * *
MEANWHILE, Johnson won the
second and third when Turner's
;utting slipped. That left Turner
one up at the turn.
Johnson birdied the next two
holes to move ahead. But Turn-
er dropped a 15-footer to even
it on the 12th.
Turner moved ahead to stay on
the 13th when Johnson's drive
buried itself in bogey land and
resulted in a bogey five.
Turner's three foot birdie putt
gave him the 16th and they
halved the 17th to end the
match.
Playing sloppily, Gregory and
Whiting were even after the first
nine.
Whiting had won his quarter-
final match four and three from
Tony Novitsky of Detroit with
three under par golf.
Band Day Set for
Hoosier -Grid Test
High School Band Day, rapidly
becoming a Michigan tradition,
will be held in conjunction with
the Michigan - Indiana football
game here, October 11, Professor
William D. Revelli, conductor of
University Bands, announced yes-
terday.
The first High School Band
Day in 1949 drew 29 bands and
1,850 members.
This year more than 100 bands
comprised of over 7,000 high school
musicians will provide the colorful
half-time ceremonies on the Mich-
igan Stadium gridiron.
TICKET SALE
for
Dept. of Speech
Plays
_ July 23-26
"Wi nterset"

Xau 1nWlat
510 East William

U

i

COOL

COOL

COOL

COOL

Major League Standings

a

p rwrik ITCIII g1

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn ....53
New York ...48
St. Louis ....48
Chicago .....43
Philadelphia .36
Cincinnati ....34
Boston ......32
Pittsburgh ...23

LEAGUE
L Pet.
22 .707
23 .632
35 .578
37 .538
42 .462
46 , .425
47 .405
60 .277.

G.B.
5%/
9
12 /
18%2
21%/
23
34

AMERICAN
W
New York ...47
Cleveland ...44
Chicago .....46
Boston ......42
Washington .41
Philadelphia .32
St. Louis ....33
Detroit ......25

LEAGUE
L Pet.
30 .610
34 .564
36 .561
36 .538
36 .532
39 .451
47 .413
52 .325

G.B.
3%/
3%/
5%/
6
12
151/
22

Today Thru Tuesday
DAZZLING JEWEL of the PaganI
Half-Jungle
Worldt

NOW SHOWING
EiI1T1Lr IEI.kYir1L

By Maxwell Anderson
July 30-Aug. 2
"Second
Threshold"
By Philip Barry
Aug. 7, 8, 9-11-
"'The Merry
Wives of
Windsor"
an opera in conjunction
with

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 5, Cincinnati 3
Brooklyn 12, Chicago 2
St. Louis 3, Philadelphia 2
Boston 5, Pittsburgh 2
GAMES TODAY
nyn -a imthn. h (h1

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 5, Detroit 4
New York 5, St. Louis 4
Washington 2, Chicago 1
Cleveland 5, Philadelphia 4
GAMES TODAY
Cleveland at Washington-
(2) Garcia (12-6) and Gromek
(4-3) vs. Marrero (7-3) and

Air
4-7-1
DALE ANNE

I

I

I M A', . n ni 9LIU

i

I

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