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July 11, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILN

MIUAY 3UMY III152

I

A .

ASE OF VANISHING CEMETERY:
Missing Professors Sought
* * * *
BY VIRGINIA VOSS
91-year-old Ann Arborite who
a sharp memory for the Uni-
sity that used to be claims that
present center of campus
ses something more than just
sroom buildings..
holds the graves of three'
ner professors.
omewhere beneath the busy
g intersection near the Gen-
1 Library, he insists, are buriedt
coffins of three unknown edu-
ors, huddled together in an:
lusive, if unheralded, Univer-
Burial Grounds.}
UT THE professors are des->}< rr ?
T t r forever unsung
ess expeditions more success- +. .f..<...+ t, :...i:=<,. r, i.: .,s;},.r..: }<}
than futile ones in the past
unearth the mysterious final +
ing places. A"r

Legislature
Plans Set
For Ballot
LANSING, Mich,-(AP)-Two riv-
al plans for reappointment of the
State Legislature were approved
yesterday, raising some questions
as to what would happen if the
State's voters okay both on the
November ballot.
The State Board of Canvassers
gave its consent for placing both
plans on the ballot, but set July
23 as a date for straightening out
a conflict over wording of the two
propositions. They have nearly
identical wording, which all agreed
could be very confusing to the
voters.
THE CIO backed Michigan
Committee for Balanced Govern-
ment did not make any effort to
block the rival plan offered by the
Michigan Committee for a Bal-
anced Legislature, sponsored by
the Michigan Farm Bureau and
the Michigan Industrial Council..
CIO representatives had ex-
amined signatures on the. bal-
anced legislature group proposal
and there had been some indi-
cation they might challenge its
validity.
The Board of Canvassers spent
some time yesterday in discussing
complaints that the wording of the
petitions was so similar that the
average voter would not realize
the difference in intent of each
group.

I

Three Education Conferences Slated Next Week

a
c,
a
u
c:
c:
,a

4

More than 550 school teachers
and administrators will be on
ampus next week for three sep-

Education Conference July 14 to
18. The theme of the five-day dis-
cussion sessions will be helping

urate education conferences sched
de c students to gain more from school
Led to discuss a wide scope of experiences.

ers and administrators with spe-
cial classroom problems.
* * *
APPROXINATELY 30 teachers
are currently attending the 26th
Annual League College, a teach-
ers' workshop which will run
through July 18. Combining the
features of a workshop and a
seminar, the conference centers

around the theme "Education for
the World of Today."
Secondary schoo will be stress-
ed at the Classroom Conference
scheduled for July 18. Headed by
director of admissions Clyde Vro-
man, the conference will discuss
common goals in the classrooms
of secondary schools and the Uni,
versify.

lassroom problems.

Morning programs will include I

About 500 educators from Mi- a 9 a.m. lecture followed by dis-

higan and Ohio are expected to
attend the 23rd annual Summer

cussion periods. Afternoon confer-
ences are designed to help teach-

se inr-te--feene ce-es--siy

The reminiscent old-timer,
Villiam Hollands, former head
f the University's printing and
inding department, recalled
iat in the late 1800's a fenc-
I University graveyard stood
here the Pharmacology Build-
ig is now.
Four professors were interred
ere, he explained, before a cen-
-of-the-campus graveyard prov-
impractical and looked a little
rural for an expanding urban-
d University. Authorities then
creed that the cemetery site be
ifted off-campus.
But only one coffin could be
covered by the grounds' depart-
nt shovels, Hollands related.
e other three remain covered
s'etches of the Diag and a
sy, unaware, campus.
A TWENTIETH century attempt
discover the missing -professors
s made by Dr. Reuben Peter-
n, former superintendent of the
diversity Hospital, according to
>llands.
Doing research work on Medi-
al School history, Dr. Peterson
ncovered records of the four
urials and the removal of one
f the graves.
Naturally curious, he made sev-
al carefully engineered attempts
locate the graves without tear-
g up the campus. He didn't
ceed.
Red Dean'
irring Up
lore Fuss

of famous
one- and two-piece cotton
SERBIN GOLFERS

C4 14

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
CLUE TO MISSING PROFESSORS?

1111i

q ;p 4

e

Today, the only clues in the
missing professor case are a weath-
er-beaten Professor's Monument
and alumni's vague memories of
once-standing gravestones.

SUMMER HOURS 12:30 to 5:00
Closed Saturdays
Other Hours by Appointment

I

The broken-column monu-
ment, now situated at the left
of the General Library, bears
the names of four professors,
who records indicate are buried
elsewhere. 'The monument is
the sole visible evidence of a,
Regents' 1845 decree to plot a
University graveyard on campus
and erect a monument on it.
According to University histor-
ians, no one was ever buried in
the 150 foot square plot and noth-
ing except misplaced Medical
School cadavers has ever been un-
covered in the course of under-
ground construction projects.

I

Miehigan Souvenirs
Gifts
Fraternity Jewelry

Mugs
Diamonds
Cups and Trophies

THE OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING FOR
UNDERGRADUATE AND LAW SCHOOLS
L. G. BALFOUR CO.

1319 S. University

Phone 3-1'733

By The Associated Press
For once, Hewlett Johnson, "Red
Dean" of Canterbury, has been
guilty of bad timing.
Dean Johnson loves to make un-
orthodox remarks, creating con-
troversy and attracting attention
to himself.
HE HAS done it again in Eng-
land by9 returning from a Com-
munist-sponsored trip to Moscow
with word that he was convinced
by "scientific" evidence that the
U.S. had adopted germ warfare in
the Far East.
The British Press, however, has
been giving him considerable at-
tention, plying him with scorn,
ridicule and sarcastic sympathy
along with serious condemnation.
It's nothing new for the Dean.
Twice in his long career he has
been castigated by his own
Archbishop. He has been rot-
ten-egged in Canada and heav-
ily guarded by New York Police
against the prospect of similar
attack.
The Manchester Guardian re-
marked Wednesday that "if his
self-complacency and self-delu-
sion were not so complete, the
Dean would be & rather pathetic
figure."
Omer To Talk
On Astronomy
Guy C. Omer, Jr., Visiting pro-
fessor from the University of Chi-
cago, will open the astronomy de-
partment's summer program of
visitor's nights at 8:30 p.m. today
in Rm. 15 Angell Hall.
Omer will talk on "The Birth of
our Universe."
Following the talk, the student
observatory on the fifth floor of
Angell Hall will be open until
10:30 p.m. for observations with
the telescopes and binoculars of
Mars and a star cluster if weather
permits.
Children are welcomed, but they
must be accompanied by adults,
department officials said.
Angel1 Biography
To Be Prepared

It's Watermelon Weather... 0
AND YOU NEED WATERMELON CLOTHES
- SANDALS with a touch of heel
-- ESPADRILLES for the ones who like their toes
covered
- PAINTED SKIRTS or woven ones for the gals who
o hate to-iron
Lots of Watermelon Clothes!
500 East Liberty C
flxI I WES Phone 3-8781
o
0 b o m n m ~ o - y .-y ~ o ..y m g - o o o s g - e n s

i

FOR SIZZLING DAYS!

*&I

You'll- find!

We've racks of cool beau-
ties you won't want to miss
at these special money sav-
ing July .

DRESSE

v

CLEARANCE
PRICES OF
100 m1495195
Many originally priced from $14.98 to
$35.00. Silk Prints-Shantungs-Nylons
--Orlons-Better Cottons and Laces.
I group..$7
Cottons-Bembergs--plus odds and ends
in Better Dresses.
We've dozens of
_S COTTONS similar to

t .: :
.. r
t
.
y . fi
' ;w s
b "
s.A 3
M
f'
A
:r
a + Nr
.> . .
>: 61
t 3 ''' "
} .
iV ,;t :
Jr ?
r '.y

U.

$T

ftt
i3
iii
5

t k
:sy s" "
ix

,

'I

95

Regularly 12.95 and 14.9

4

9

Woven-pattern broadcloths, chambrays and ginghams!
Solids, stripes, checks, plaids and combinations!
Ji, en vu won rt tm nt i4,e n n £4 n ; ;n o f ,t , 1 ,m.;Ipm -.,if;,

like the one above of
pure silk or nylon at

one left, above in
$7.00 & $10.00 groups

C

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