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July 09, 1952 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-09

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 9,1905?

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE'FV

WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1~5~! THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE VIVE

woom

Korean

Raises

Crops

by

Primitive,

Unsanitary

Methods

* * *

* *

* * *

* *

* * *

CPL. ROBERT R. KORFF
PUSAN-It has been said that the Korean farmer can grow any-
thing-anywhere.
While this may not be entirely true he does grow crops in a land
which is largely mountainous and unsuitable for cultivation. In the
midst of these adverse conditions the startling fact remains that he
brings in is crop each year without the aid of scientific methods, mo-
dern machinery, or technical assistance.
HOW DOES he do it? Let's follow a Korean farmer, call him Jong
Chae Dok, through his growing season
Jong owns a small plot of land, upon which he raises enough
rice and vegetables to feed his family, or, in some cases, many
families that live in his house. The average daily consumption of
rice in Korea is three hops per person, or approximately 6%
pounds. If Jong is fortunate he may own two, maybe three acres,
and if he is extremely fortunate, he may have an ox; otherwise,
Jong's wife will have to get in front of his crude wooden plow.
Because of the scarcity of tillable land in Korea, Jong cultivates
every inch of his property-even up to the front door of his straw
house, If he lives up on a hillside, he will plant his rice paddies in ter-
races resembling long, low flights of stairs.
Throughout the summer the paddies will blossom into fields
of deep green, but Jong does not depend entirely upon mother
nature. His land has been tilled and retilled for thousands of years
to the infinite point of exhaustion. In order to replenish his soil
with the necessary nutrients, he must fertilize constantly. He
knows nothing about scentifically-produced fertilizers, so human
waste (night soil) is used.
The American farmer undoubtedly would have parted with Jong's
methods much earlier in this story and justifiably so, for Jong's farm
practices do not exemplify good sanitation. His fertilizer is disease-
ridden. His crops absorb the dangerous bacteria in the soil, his family
eats the crops and reabsorb the bacteria. And though the mortality
rate of Jong's family may be high, most important to him is the fact
that he gets his crop out.

* *

WOMEN GLEANERS WEED A PADDY AS SOON AS THE RICE POKES ABOVE THE WATER

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COOL COTTONS .. .

THE KOREAN FARMER WITH HIS PRIMITIVE PLOW AND HIS BULL

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NIGHT SOIL IS LADLED FROM A STORAGE PIT INTO
THE FARMERS 'HONEYBUCKET'

THE FARMER ANT, HIS WIFE THRESH THE NEW CUT WHEAT

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Photos by
Cpl. Edward H.
Johnson

'own & Country Shop
302 South State Street

AIR-CONDITIONED STORE

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