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July 03, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:

AGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952

: .

Cast of 'Twelfth Night' Relaxes, Rehearses Behind the Sce

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Single admission tickets for
he Speech Department plays
nay be obtained from 10 a.m.
o 8 p.m. daily at the Lydia
4endelssohn box office for
1.20, 90 cents and 60 cents.
Season tickets may still be
urchased this week for $5.75,
4.50, and $3.
All performances begin at
p.m. There will be a play the
week of July 13th.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

HILARITY-Richard Burwin, Grad., playing the role of the rau-
TIME OUT-Joel Sebastian, '54, who plays the part of the senti- cous fun-maker Sir Toby Belch, rehearses one of the many hum-
mental Duke Orsino and Carole Eiserman, Grad., featured in the orous "Twelfth Night" scenes with two others in the speech de-
role of the wealthy Countess Olivia, take a break between scenes. partment cast.

LIGHTS UP -- A stagehand in the Speech Department's production of Shakespeare's "Twelfth
Night" throws the switch as the curtain rises during one of the play's many rehearsals.

A DAILY PHOTO FEATURE: PICTURES BY MATTY KESSLER

4

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JELAXING--Herb Rovner, Grad., who handles the role of Feste
--one of Shakespeare's most jovial jesters, keeps up with the
mnagazines during intermission.
U' Hospital Outpatient Clinic
To Provide Better Facilities

C< -

By JOYCE FICKIES
A proposed system of "roving
consultants," a 24-hour emergen-
cy service and 160 examining
rooms are some of the features of
the new University Hospital Out-
patient Clinic, to be opened this
fall.
The seven-story building, which
joins the northeast part of the
Law Students
Perform Well
Ont Bar Tests
University law students had
themselves a field day in the
State Bar examinations given
here in mid-April, it was disclosed.
Russell A. Smith, Secretary of
the Law School, stated he was
"advised by a bar examiner" that
every one of the "upwards of 50"
University law students taking the
examinations for the first time.
had passed them. The bar exami-
nations were administered to a
total, of 247 hopefuls from all
corners of the state.
COMMENTING on the good
showing of the University lawyers
in the examinations, Smith said,
the "results are better than us-
ual."
"Normally," he continued, "95+
per cent of our applicants pass
the test."
Every phase and division of the
law is covered in the examinations,
and the applicants must pass in
at least 30 of the 40 questions on
each subject.
Applicants to take the test are

hospital will supplant the present
insufficient out-patient facilities.
The clinic will provide for time
saving techniques and better ac-
commodations for patients. It will
also offer facilities for the train-
ing of medical students.
ONE NEW feature which has
been proposed for the building is
a system of "roving consultants."
These consultants, regular staff
members, would be sent around to
the various clinics in the building
to diagnose the patients. This
would supplant the present me-
thod, by which the patients travel
to see the doctors.
A full time, 24-hour emergen-
cy service will be established. At
present, ambulance cases are
sent to the other hospitals in
Ann Arbor, because the cinic
in use is not equipped to handle
mass accident cases.
There will be a much greater
amount of space in the building
than there is in the present fa-
cilities which include one floor
and scattered diagnostic centers'
in the hospital proper. Approxi-
mately 160 examining rooms-
more than three times the num-
ber of those in use now-will be
provided.
ALL 22 OF the speciality clinics
of the outpatient division will be
explained and moved to the new
building. Modern equipment will
be installed: only that which is
in "excellent condition" or which
has been purchased during the
last few years will be transferred.
*
The outpatient clinic will
provide for the care of patients
who are not confined to bed and
who do not require hospital
care. Work will be focused on

With the exception of a George
Bernard Shaw first edition and a
collection of poetry by Gertrude
Stein, the books are not rare, but
are the most important-perhaps
the most used books in their field,
according to Ella Hymans of the
Library's rare books department.
A similar exhibit of American
books that have influenced mo-
dern thought is on display at the
Clements Library.
BOOKS:
Rebates Out
At Illini Union
Bookstore,
The University of Illinois Board
of Trustees has decided to revoke
the policy of issuing student divi-
dends from the campus Union
bookstore and instead to lower
the price on over-the-counter
sales at the bookstore.
Before the measure was ap-
proved students purchasing books
from the college store collected
rebates at the end of the semester.
~K * *
ACCORDING TO a report in
the Daily Illini, the move was
made in an effort to sustain fair
prices in the Illini Union book-
store, protect students and faculty
against possible high prices which
independent b o o k s t o r e s could
charge, protect free enterprise and
fair competition and help pay for
Illini Union services.
Several independent book-
stores had filed complaints with
the University, taking issue with
the co-op store's policy of not
charging sales tax.
In another effort to appease in-
dependent store operators, the
board approved a recommenda-
tion that the Union bookstore sell
nothing but books and supplies
needed for University courses.
During the 1950-51 school year
not quite 5,000 students qualified
for dividends, which. were less
than $3 per student.
The chairman of the board of
trustees policy committee felt that
lowering the over-the-counter

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