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July 02, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1952

Music

Camp
- 4 e* *

ens
Qps

25th
* * *

Year

* S

By MARGE SHEPHERD '
The University's National Music
Camp at Interlochen, Michigan
will open its twenty-fifth season
with a full musical summer plan-
ned fo rthe record-breaking enroll-
ment of 1,600 teen-age students.
Founded m 1928 by Joseph E.
Maddy, professor of radio, music,
the camp has grown from its hum-
ble start with 115 students and
a few buildings to become the
world's largest and oldest summer
music Camp.
THIS SUMMER a new $50,000
Administration Building, financed
by students and friends of the
Camp will be dedicated in honor
of Prof. Maddy.
Official opening day cere-
monies for the anniversary year
were held Sunday in the out-
door Interlochen Bowl, where
5,000 visitors joined the teen-
agers, dressed in the uniform
blue corduroy britches, to fill
the rustic benches for the birth-
day celebration.
Years of labor union contro-
versy have clouded the camp's his-
tory, beginning in 1942 when the
teenage symphony orchestra was
banned from the national net-
works, after a row with James C.
Petrillo, president of the American
Federation of. Musicians. The
Camp was blacklisted by the AFM
in 1945 and Prof. Maddy was ex-
pelled from the union for his In-
terlochen activities.
* * *
TERMED "THE greatest single
center of youth culture" in the
country, the music camp now
draws non-union faculty from
music colleges and conservatories
from throughout the United
States, and students from 42 states
and Canada.
The first public concert of the
anniversary season will be pre-
sented today by the newly formed
National Music Camp Opera
Company under the direction of
Barre Hill, of the American Con-
servatory of Music in Chicago.
During the 57-day season, the
company will perform 33 per-
formances of 14 different scores.

I

PROF. JOSEPI4 E. MADDY, PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER EXERCISE IN GRACE

* * *

Pigeon Discovered Hitching Ride
WOLFF ways under a state of tension,

PROF. JOHN SHEPARD of the
psychology department was in-
clined to attribute the pigeon's
train ride to luck. He did not feel
it planned to hitch the ride be-

cause of the lack of evidence that
pigeons are capable of such car-
ryings-on.
Explaining that they are al-

Harvard Crimson Surveys
Academic Freedom Violations

(Continued from Page 1)
Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.'s "What
About Communism" banned by
the Denver Board of Education.
THE ROLE of accuser was
prominently filled last year by the
National Council for American
Education and two American Le-
gion posts.
The Council, headed by Allan
A., ZolI, issued a list entitled
"Reducators at Leading Wom-
en's Colleges." It names 100'
professors in nine schools as
possessing affiliation with "sub-
versive" organizations. Six col-
lege presidents are among the
accused group.
This brought the total of the
NCAE's "reducators" to 345. Pre-,
vious lists had been issued for
Harvard, Chicago, Yale, California,
Stanford, Columbia, Dartmouth
and the California Institute of
Technology.
THE AMERICAN Legion was
involved in an eight month run-
ning battle with Sarah Lawrence+
New Education
Course Set'
'Education for Today's Children']
will be the theme of a two-week,]
two hour credit course at the Uni-
versity July 7 to 18.
The topics for discussion include
child development and pupil ad-
justment, mental and physical]
health of the child, school-com-
munity relations, developing the
basic skills, and evaluation and

College. In a Legion magazine
article written by Louis Budenz,
the school was accused of har-
boring "Communists." The Legion
post in Westchester, New York,
adjacent to Sarah Lawrence, im-
mediately demanded an investi-
gation.
A similar attack on Pennsyl-
vania State College by the Bella-
fonte, Pa. Legion post, also met
with flat refusal to bow to the
pressures.
The University of Colorado
and the University of Minnesota
were both involved in controver-
sies over the disputed firings of
faculty members.
Permission to -leave the coun-
try was refused to two professors,
John L. Fairbanks of Harvard, a
trustee of the Institute of Pacific
Relations and Linius Pauling of
California Institute of Technol-
ogy, who was once charged with
"subversive" affiliations.
s* *
OTHER DISPUTES over aca-
demic freedom involved Brooklyn
College which expelled the Young
Progressives; the University of
California which accepted a full-
time state employee to look for
"subversives"; Cornell, where the
president labeled as "leftist" a
petition to have the university
deny its approval to boarding
houses known to discriminate; and
Piedmont College where a trustee
and a dean have resigned in pro-
test over -accepting a grant from
the Texas Educational Associa-
tion; headed by General Van Horn
Mosely, a former American First-
er with extreme racist views.
In an editorial in the Aca-
demic Freedom issue, the editors

442 Foreign
Students Here
Foreign student enrollment fig-
ures for the summer session stand
at 442, Robert B. Klinger, assist-
ant counselor to foreign students
announced yesterday.
The number shows no marked
deviation. from last summer's en-
rollment when 440 foreign stu-
dents were listed.
Nearly 60 countries and regions
are represented in the enrollment,
Klinger said.
Latin America leads in the re-
gions with 162 students. Others
are: the Far East, 119; the British
Commonwealth, 62; Europe and
Africa, 52; the Near East, 47.
Canada and China are the two
leading countries. Forty-six Ca-
nadian students are enrolled, and
China has 42 students represented.
Other countries with more than
ten students represented are In-
dia, Venezuela, Brazil, Colombia,
Iraq, The Philippines, Mexico,
Thailand, Turkey, Chili, Cuba, El
Salvador and Japan.
Children's Art
To Be Shown Here
'Children's Art Work from the
Public Schools of Michigan' will
be shown at the University July 9
to 18 in the Mezzanine Galleries
of. the Rackham Building,
Exhibit items, totaling approxi-
mately 200 paintings and craft
work, are intended to furnish in-
structional examples in the ,visual
arts course, given this summer in
the College of Architecture and
Design.
I imney.

'U' Promotes
103 to Rank
Of Professor
(Continued from Page 1)
ren (Organ and Church Music).
College of Architecture and De-
sign: Carlos Lopez (Drawing and
Painting).
Department of Physical Educa-
tion and Athletics: Pearl Berlin
(Physical Education for Women),
Richard Henry Hagelin (Physical
Education), Newton Clayton Lo-
ken (Physical Education and In-
tercollegiate Athletics), Dennis
Rigan (Physical Education).
TO THE RANK OF
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
College of Literature, Science
and the Arts: William Payne Als-
ton (Philosophy), Dean Craven
Baker (Journalism), Harry Berg-
holz (German), Raoul Bott (Ma-
thematics), Hayden Kenna Car-
ruth (Speech), Nelson George
Hairston (Zoology), John Whit-
ney Hall (History), Paul Van
Campen Hough (Physics), Ure-
less Norton Lanham (Zoology),
Kenneth Baylis Leisering (Mathe-
matics), Cyrus Levinthal (Phy-
sics), Arthur L. Lohwater (Mathe-
matics), Daniel Stephen McHar-
gue (Political Science), John Fre-
derick Muehl (English), Donald
Ross Pearce (English), George
Ammon Peek, Jr. (Political Sci-
ence), Charles Wilbur Peters (Phy-
sics), Karl Henry Reichenbach
(History), Christian Sc river Ron-
destvedt, Jr., (Chemistry), Yao
Shen (Chinese), William Richard
Steinhoff (English), Frederick
Patton Thieme (Anthropology).
College of Engineering: Maurice
Andre Brull (Aeronautical Engi-
neering), Stuart Winston Chur-
chill (Chemical and Metallurgical
Engineering), Thomas Alexander
~Hunter (Engineering Mechanics),
Jules Sid Needle (Electrical Engi-
neering), John Randolph Sellars
(Aeronautical Engineering), Fre-
derick John Vesper (Mechanical
Engineering), E dw in Harold
Young (Chemical and Metallur-
gical Engineering).
Medical School. Dr. Robert
Wayne Bailey (Surgery), James
Felter Hogg (Biological Chemis-
try), Dr. Jack Lapides (Surgery),
Dr. Howard Bennett Latourette
(Roentgenology), Dr. John Edwin
Orebaugh (Surgery), Dr. Robert
Eugene Yoss (Anatomy), Thorn-
ton Woodward Zeigler (Psychia-
try).

Eastman Says
English Should
Be Improved
By MADELINE SCHULTZ
There is a great heed for im-
proved communication in the
English language-not only for its
commercial value, according to
Arthur M. Eastman of the Eng-
lish department.
Eastman spoke at the second
weekly meeting of the Conference
for English Teachers held Mon-
day.
The topic under discussion was
basic skills in communication for
pupils not going on to college.
Taking part in the discussion were
Dorothy C. Roe, Michigan Bell
Telephone Co.; Brendan Sexton,
educational director, UAW-CIO;
Edgar W. Whan, a production
planner in Kaiser-Frazer Co.; and
Eastman who was group chairman.
* * *
EACH OF these persons felt
that by use of correct grammar,
good speaking ability and legible
handwriting one is able to obtain
a responsible position in either
business or industry.
Practical suggestions to high
school teachers were given. Mrs.
Roe suggested that there should
be more training on conversa-
tion and spelling. She stated
that motivation is being inade-
quately stressed in the schools.
Whan felt that "the way we
write is more important than rules.
Those who understand grammar
know how to use it."
Sexton offered another point of
view. He said that teachers think'
students going into manual labor
do not need grammar. The stu-
dents' interest in reading is there-
by stifled by the training they
receive in school.

I P

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