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September 17, 1952 - Image 17

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-17

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&Y, SEPTEMBER 17,1)52

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

Lantern Night
Annual Event
Houses Compete in
Sing; Cup Is Given
One of the many traditional
events for women on the Univer-
sity campus is the annual Lantern
.~Night program.
Sponsored by the executive
board of the Women's Athletic As-
sociation, the festivities each year,
honor graduating senior women.
* * *
LANTERN NIGHT is an out-
growth of a program which origi-
nated in 1913.
Then all coeds took part in
races and various other events
at a women's field day at Pal-
mer Field. Later each class pre-
sented a special group of stunts.
In 1932 the first line of march
was held, with the procession tak-
ing place around Palmer Field.
FROM THIS PARADE came the
tradition of Japanese lanterns and
hoops, and from this the name,
Lantern Night, originated.
At that time the seniors car-
rid lanterns in the line of
march and the juniors carried
hoops through which the fresh-
men jumped.
At the conclusion of the eve-
ning's fun the seniors gave their
' lanterns to the juniors, while the
hoops were handed down to the
sophomores.
THIS YEAR'S 39TH program
was to have begun with the tra-
ditional line of march of all wom-
en students to Hill Auditorium.
However, the march was canceled
because of rain.
The parade was to have been
led by the Michigan Marching
anid, followed by a huge block
'M', composed of 27 coed cam-
pus leaders.
In the past the senior women,
dressed in their caps and gowns,
followed the band.

Co-Recreation Expands To Include Outing, Skating, Dance

Although organized primarily
for women, the Women's Athletic
Association also includes men in
its activities by sponsoring six
co-recreation clubs.
The programbegan about five
years ago when the ballet and
modern dance clubs included men
in their memberships.
SHORTLY AFTER this, the ice
skating and folk and square dance
clubs began taking in male mem-
bers. Allan VanDiere was appoint-
ed manager of the folk and square
dance club for this year and is
the only man on the WAA Board.
The skating club will elect a new
manager at its first meeting of
the year.
Also included as co-recrea-
* * ,

tional clubs are the town and
country club, an outing club,
the badminton club and the rid-
ing club.
Badminton and riding clubs
have been organized as co-recre-
ational clubs this year for the first
time.
TO COORDINATE the activi-
ties of the clubs, a co-recreational
board has been set up, headed by
a co-recreational chairman. Nan-
cy Lewis will hold the position this
year.
Managers of all co-rec clubs
are included as members of this
board.
In the future, if interest is suf-
ficient, all WAA clubs may be-
come co-recreational.
* * ,

* * *
RECENTLY, WAA has organiz-
ed co-recreational competition to
include both men and women.
Tournaments were held on
Friday nights at the Intramural
Building in volleyball and bad-
minton. Bowling competition
was also scheduled.
Play in a mixed softball league
was held during the spring.
This year members of. the WAA
board will serve as hostesses at
the IM Building each Friday night,
to aid in the expansion of the
co-rec program.
Clubs scheduling co-rec acti-
vity include:
Badminton - Plans for the 16
week badminton season will be
discussed at the first meeting of
the year in Waterman Gymna-
sium. Both men and women, be-
ginning and advanced players are
invited to attend the weekly meet-
ings. Plans for the season include
intra-club tournaments, exhibi-
tion matches, and an inter-club
tournament with Michigan State
Normal College.
The club also sponsors the Wo-
men's all-Campus Singles and
Doubles tournament in the spring.
Ice Skating-Twirls, spins and
just plain skating are practiced
by members of the ice-skating
club at their meetings at the Uni-
versity skating rink.
Each year members of the club
present an ice show, which enables
them to exhibit their skating
"know-how."
Riding-At the organizational
meeting of the riding club an as-
sistant will be elected to aid man-
ager, Mary Malcolm, in club af-
fairs. Both beginning and ad-
vanced riders are invited to join
the club.
Tryouts will be held for the crop
and saddle club, to consist of eight
members, both men and women.
This team will work at drills to
be presented at the club's annual
horse show in the spring.

Breakfast and supper rides will
be part of the club's planned acti-
vities.
The entire student body is in-
vited to compete in the horse
show.
Town and Country-Activities
of the Town and Country club
include hiking, cook outs, bi-
cycling, canoeing, bowling, square
dancing, riding and treasure
hunts. All students are invited to
join.
This year the club sponsored a
hay ride, in which the whole cam-
pus was invited to participate.
Managed by Jo Robbins, the
club is affiliated with the Nation-
al Youth Hostel Association.
Folk and Square Dance-Free
instruction will be provided to all
members of the folk and square
dance club.

The club will sponsor a square
dance during Orientation Week at
8 p.m. Sept. 18, in the parking
lot between the Natural Science
and Chemistry Buildings.
Parties are planned for special
occasions, such as Halloween and
the' IM Building open houses.
Members of the club meet weekly
to practice "swinging their part-
ners."
Ballet-Aiming to promote the
classical dance form, ballet, the
ballet club provides its members
with instruction and opportunity
for performance.
Members are also encouraged to
try their hand at choreography.
Some of the resulting compositions
will be used in club presentations.
The club presents its programs
in cooperation with the Modern
Dance club.

MICHIFISH-Members of the WAA Club Michifish await their
turns to show their porpoise-like skill. Michifish present two
shows each year.

* * *
THE JUNIORS with yellow
bows in their hair escorted the
seniors to the sing. The sopho-
mores and freshmen wore red and
green bows, respectively, to dis-
tinguish them from the upper-
classmen.
After'the procession, the eve-
ning's main event, the Lantern
Night Sing, was held in Hill Au-
ditorium.
HOUSES ELIMINATED from
final competition support the
competing groups with songs and
cheers.
During eliminations, the pos-
ture of the choirs is judged, and

S -* * 4
the group with the best posture
is awarded a cup on Lantern
Nnight.
Concluding the program is the
presentation of WAA awards. The
cup awarded to the house having
the highest participation in ath-
letics was presented this year to
Kappa. Kappa Gamma. Helen
Newberry Residence won a cer-
tificate for the most participation
in houses over 100 women and Ad-
elia Cheever won the same award
for houses under 100.
The Lantern Night program has
gone througl, several variations
to become one of the coeds' fa-
vorite events.

MICHIGAN COEDS' FAVORITE SHOE DEPARTMENT
Your favorite Back-to-Schooler
r Scotch Grailn Kiltes
S ma
r
I,'
I*

OUTING-One of the most recent additions to the WAA club pro-
gram is co-recreation clubs. Above Outing Club members pre-
pare for an outdoor-cooked meal after a long ride.

I

l

PHYSICAL EDUCATION:
Department Gives Instruction

e 6SA

"Have fun learning" might be
the slogan of the Women's Physi-
cal Education Department which
offers incoming Freshmen and
transfer students instructions in a
variety of sports.
To facilitate the incoming co-
ed's desire for individual activi-
ties, the department offers classes
in the early fall in archery, golf,
riding, tennis, dancing (folk,
square, modern and social) swim-
ming and life saving.
This program is augmented by
field hockey, outing, soccer and
volleyball. In other seasons les-
sons are aslo given in such team
sports as basketball and speedball.
For those who wish to be more
proficient on ice, figure skating
classes are held during the second
part of the fall season and first
part of the spring semester.
In addition to the other courses
taught, badminton, fencing and
posture, figure and carriage are
added to the curriculum for the
indoor season.
Valuable experience is gained
by students taking recreational
leadership. At the end of this
course certificates are granted
which have aided many coeds in
getting camp positions.
This extensive program has pro-
ved so popular that it is difficult
for upperclassmen to get into the

classes later because of limitations
in facilities and staff members.
Instruction in physical educa-
tion for women began in 1897
when the first instructor was hir-
ed, Barbour gymnasium being con-
structed in that same year. At that
time facilities were provided for
only 200 women.
Today over 3,000 of the 5,500
women of the University take part
in the physical education program
which is divided into three units:
the required program for entering
(Continued on Page 6)

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