100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 17, 1952 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TEN

THE MICHG AN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,;SEPTEMBm1E , 1952

CENTRAL RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATION:

,

SRA Includes 24 Campus Faiths

- *

- - -

Another semester's program of
religious and social activities will
be inaugurated this fall by the
Student Religious Association.
Housed in a red-brick building
on State Street called Lane Hall,
BRA represents the interests of all
\faiths and cultures on campus. It
is the central organization for 24
religious groups.
ALL UNIVERSITY students are
entitled to participate in the As-
sociation's activities and to use
Lane Hall facilities, including a
library, music room, auditorium,
kitchen, meeting rooms and
lounge.
SRA's program is student-
created by the various depart-
ments within the organization:
study and discussion; social ac-
tion; public relations; intercul-
tural; social and recreational;
outstate; and relief.
Combined activities of the de-
partments include luncheon-dis-
cussions, religious seminars, par-
ticipation in campus politics and
community service projects, radio
workshop broadcasts, intercultural
"retreats," Friday coffee hours,
orientation week program, and
work with community centers and
other churches in the state.
SRA also handles relief proj-
ects such as World Student Ser-
vice Fund and other campus
drives.
USHERING IN the fall activities
will be a Student Religious As-
-:sociation retreat on Sunday, Mo-
day and Tuesday, September 14,
15 and 16, at the Judson Collins
Camp In the Irish Hills near
Brooklyn, Michigan.
The retreat has a two-fold
purpose: to provide an oppor-
tunity for the cabinet members
of each religious group to meet
and plan their coming year's
program; and to bring student
leaders of all campus religious
organizations together for train-
ing in leadership techniques.
According to SRA, the guest
speaker and organizer of the group
in leadership techniques this year
will "be Prof. T. Z. Koo of the
University of Iowa.
* . *
THE FRESHMAN Rendezvous
will be held September 12, 13, and
14 at the University Fresh Air
Camp. Bus transportation will be
provided.
Offering opportunities for
freshmen to get acquainted with
faculty members and student
leaders in religious activities,
the Rendezvous will have facil-
ities for about 125 freshmen and
25 student and faculty coun-
selors. Each freshman will pay
a registration fee of $7.00.
President Harlan H. Hatcher,
Dean Erich Walter, Dean Deborah
Bacon, De Witt C. Baldwin, Lane
Hall Director, and other members
of the University faculty will lead
the discussions.
SRA ALSO coordinates the ac-
tivities of 24 student religious
groups at the University. These
groups sponsor a wide variety of
activities-discussions, worships,
picnics, intramural athletics, hikes,
dances, social political action,
Bible study, drama and music.
Most of them have professionally
trained leaders who serve as reli-
gious counselors to the atudents.'
* * *
THE NEWMAN CLUB is the
campus organization of Catholic
students. Under the guidance of1
The Rev.Fr. Frank J. McPhillips,
the club is part of St. Mary's
Student Chapel.
The Newman Club's program
includes various discussion
groups on Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday nights. Weekly
devotions are held on Wedne's-

m

'U' Handles
Student Job
Qpportunities
Personnel Office
Helps Workers
Job opportunities for students
paying part or all of their expenses
are available through the Univer-
sity's Personnel Office in the Ad-
ministration Bldg.
By keeping in contact with lo-
cal business establishments, indi-
vidual householders and various
departments in the University, the
office is able to advise students of
recently opened positions.
THE PERSONNEL Office in
the Administration Building aids
students in need of work through
contact with local business es-
tablishments, individual house-
holders, and various departments
in the University.
A variety of jobs from soda
fountain work to animal care
will be open, and students may
begin to apply at the office as
soon as they have registered.
When their class scheiule is
known, working hours can be fit-
ted into the students' programs
in the most convenient way possi-
ble.
STUDENTS DESIRING work in
dormitories, the libraries, League.
Union and various departmental
offices, must apply directly, as the
Personnel office does not handle
this type of work.
About 75 per cent of the calls
are non-University, from local
businesses and householders.
This work includes gardening,
painting, sales work, gas-sta-
tion attendant and restaurant
work.
Non-academic unskilled Univer-
sity jobs handled by the Office
include picture-hanging and
grounds labor.
Students are advised to budget
their time carefully so that work-
ing will not interfere with their
academic studies. Dormitory em-
ployment is recommended for
freshmen, since it fits in with
their schedule, and makes use of
time which otherwise might be
wasted.
-- - - - - - - - - -- - -

Headquarters f o r University
students is the Office of Student
Affairs, on the ground floor of the
Administration Building.
Presided over by Dean of Stu-
dents Erich A. Walter, it is the
central office of many student ac-
tivities as well as the source of
various directives regulating stu-
dent conduct.
THE OFFICE IS CROWDED
throughout the day with students
who are requesting eligibility
cards for extra-curricular activi-
ties, getting automobile permits,
checking the social calendar, look-
ing for vacancies in rooming
houses, or maybe reviewing the
account of one of the many stu-
dent organizations.
The Office 'files a personal

record card for each student on
which is kept a record of his ex-
tra-curricular activity, discip-
linary penalties and other data.
The post of Dean of Students
was formed by the Board of Re-
gents in 1921. This was the first
job of this kind in the country.
THE DUTY OF THE Dean of
Students is to be "friend, counse-
lor and guide to the student body
with general oversight of its wel-
fare and its activities."
As a result, the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs has become catch-
all for the entire Uniersity.
Even mail clerks who find them-
selves with letters they don't know
what to do with drop them off
at the office.

STUDENT AFFAIRS:
Dean's Office Handles Activities

As the office gathered more and
more jobs, it began nibbling rooms
away from the Registrar's Office
until it moved into its own office
in the new Administration Build-
ing two years ago.
* * * .
IN ITS YEARS of existence the
post of Dean of Students has ac-
cumulated the jobs of ex-officio
membership in the University Sen-
ate, Board in Control of Student
Publications, Board of Directors of
the Union, Board of Governors of
Residence Halls, and many more.
Before becoming Dean of Stu-
dents in 1947, Dean Walter had
served as faculty member in
the English department, assistant
dean, and later associate dean of
the College of Literature, Science
and the Arts.

b 41

STUDENTS-Vae your
LAUNDRY PROBLEMS
WASH and DRY your entire laundry in

I

-Daily-Jack Bergstro,
STUDENTS LEAVE ONE OF MANY CAMPUS CHURCHES AFTER SERVICE

day evening, and open house on
Friday and Saturday nights.
The club also sponsors frequent
communion breakfasts to which it
invites guest speakers. It is cur-
rently planning to build a student
center.
B'NAI B'RITH Hillel Foundation
serves as the religious center for
Jewish students at the University.
Under the direction of Rabbi
Hershel Lymon, the group spon-
sors forums, religious %activities,
welfare drives, and Publication
of the Hillel News. It also offers
a program of lectures, socials and
Friday evening services.
Hillel's biggest event of the past
year was the opening of their .ew
headquarters in a modern build-
ing on Hill Street.
THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Or-
ganization has its headquarters at
Lane Hall and holds meetings ev-
ery Tues'day evening.
Among its activities it spon-
sors two lectures on Christian
Science each year. The organiza-
tion also keeps a reading room
off the Lane Hall library.
s s .
THE GRACE Bible Student
Group, under the leadership of
Carl Knopf, meets at 6:15 p.m.
Sundays for social and discussion
sessions.
THE UNITARIAN Student
Group, under the direction of
Rev. Edward H. Redman, spon-
sors a program of discussion and
forums on the important social,
political and campus issues of
the day.
INTER-GUILD is a student or-
ganization which integrates the
activities of most of the Protest-
ant religious groups, or "guilds"
on campus and promotes coopera-
tion between them.
* * *
THE ROGER Williams Guild,
affiliated with the First Baptist
Church, is under the direction of
The Rev. C. H. Loucks and his
assistant, Mrs. Monica McGregor.
Planning this year to dedicate a
new recreation and meeting room,
the Guild's regular activities in-
clude Sunday Bible study and sup-
per discussions, and a Friday so-
cial function.
* * *.
THE EVANGELICAL and Re-
formed Student Guild meets every
Sunday evening for supper, dis-
cussion and fellowship. The pro-

gram is student planned with the
help of The Rev. Walter S. Press,
associate pastor of the Bethlehem
Church.
THE CHINESE Students' Christ-
ian Association in North America
has a chapter at LaneHall.
It is organized by Chinese stu-
dents for the purpose of promot-
friendship between American and
Chinese students.
CONGREGATIONAL - Disciples
Guild is composed of students
from Congregational and Discip-
les of Christ churches.
Week-day activities of the group
include Tuesday tea, discussion
groups and social functions. The
guild is directed by The Rev. H.l
L. Pickerill assisted by Marilynn
Williams.
CANTERBURY CLUB is the
Episcopal student foundation on
the campus.
The guild works under the lead-
ership of the Rev. Wilbur Schutze
and holds communion breakfasts,
Sunday evening meetings, Friday
open-houses and study groups.
, , *
THE ANN ARBOR Friends
Meeting has its headquarters at
Lane Hall. In addition to worship
meetings, it holds frequent work
parties to prepare clothing and
other materials for the American
Friends Service Committee foreign
relief program.
THE ORTHODOX Students So-
ciety was established for all Greek
Orthodox students on the campus.
Under the guidance of The Rev.
Lambros Vakalakis, the group
holds Wednesday evening open
house and sponsors religious, ed-
ucational and social programs.
THE LUTHERAN Student Asso-
ciation is the local unit of the
National Lutheran Council, and
is under the direction of the Rev.
Henry 0. Yoder.
The group meets every Sunday
evening and holds Tuesday even-
ing discussions, Wednesday Coffee
Hours, and weekend social events.
GAMMA DELTA is the Luther-
an Student Club of the Missouri
Synod. The group is part of an
all-student congregation under the
supervision of The Rev. Alfred
Scheips. Activities of the guild
include Sunday Bible Class and
evening supper and program.
TH h. *
THE MICHIGAN Christian Fel-

lowship, affiliated with the In-
tervarsity Christian Fellowship, is
an organization of Protestant stu-
dents who subscribe to the faith
of historic Christianity.
Groupractivities include week-
ly Sunday program and tea, Wed-
nesday Bible study and such social
events as parties, picnics, and
hikes.
* * *
THE STUDENTS' Evangelical
Chapel is organized chiefly of
Christian Reformed students.
WESLEYAN GUILD for Metho-
dist Students is directed by The
Rev. Eugene Ransom of the First
Methodist Church.
Sunday evening supper and fel-
lowship, Wednesday tea and Fri-
day recreation comprise the groups
activities.
WESTMINSTER Student Guild
serves Presbyterian students on
campus.
The group holds a student sem-
inar in religion, a Sunday even-
ing fellowshop meeting, Wednes-
day tea and a Friday social.
* * *
THREE NEW student religious
groups began functioning last year
under Student Religious Associa-
tion membership. They are the
Nazarene, the Free Methodist and
the Latter Day Saints groups.
Two other recently formed or-
ganizations will begin functioning
this fall. They are the Moslem
Religious Association and the
Evangelical and United Brethren
Guild.

an hour at our

store.

Wash,

rinse and

damp-dry clothes automatically in West-
inghouse automatic washers.
" DRYERS available to dry clothes com-
pletely.
" SHIRTS quick - serviced on our new
shirt press.
/fflh nvnt

HAIR-STYLING
FOR LADIES
TO PLEASE
NO APPOINTMENTS NEEDED
The Dascola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theater

1

510 EAST WILLIAM

PHONE 5540

IL

JIII

I

Book Store
The Student Legislature used
book exchange will open Sep-
tember 17.
More than 1400 books will be
in stock at cut-rate prices as a
service to the student body.
Previously sponsored by the In-
terfraternity Council, the non-
profit exchange was taken over
by SL at the beginning of the
spring term, and handled over
$4,000 worth of business in
February.
Located in Rm. 18 Angell
Hall, the exchange will be open
from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. from
Sept. 17 through Sept. 24, and
from 1 to 5:30 p.m. on Sept. 25
and 26.

WHAT'S
AN

THIS-

)PEN

.1

Ir

NEW and USED

-J

f
j
r / //
' 1
i ' ~
c r
V ! 1 ,
!
/i .r r
,,,, .
t .
i + "
's ,'
1 " ,
J v
"
"
1

HOUSE?
Right ,you are,
My Friend!
We invite you ALL
to the
Student Publications'
Open House

Here's a grand opportunity for you to come and inspect the facilities of the Stu-

STUDENT SUPPLIES

9

dent Publications Building.

See the "inside" operation of

THE MICHIGAN DAILY ... THE MICHIGANENSIAN
f' 1" t~IV~~UT V ~l TT'TbA'TTtllS

m _____ ___ -

111 1 u,- m11i-M_ - -a- m 11

III

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan