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June 26, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WGE FOUR

TilE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 195?

BASEBALL, DIXIELAND FAN:

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Marie Tolst
By HARRY LXUNN
Marie Tolstoy, granddaughter
of the famed Russian author, Leo
Tolstoy, has come to campus this
summer to teach several courses in
the Slavic language deparment.
The Russian-born, but thor-
oughly Americanized teacher is a
woman of wide travels and diver-
sified Interests. Her many hobbies
range from baseball to record col-
lectings
SHE HAS few recollections of
her celebrated grandfather, writer
of such masterpieces as "War and
Peace," for he died when she was
three years old. However, she does
recall his eyes, which had "a pier-
eing and frightening appearance
to many adults, but seemed kindly
and understanding to children."
rMiss. Tolstoy lived in Russia
throughout the two revolutions
of 1917 and 1914 and came to
Czechoslov&W in 1924 when she
mas 16 years old. "Our family
"awe not persecuted' during the
yrolution, although all our

)y To Teach Russian Here

f !

jored in Slavic philology, the study
of Slavic languages and their de-
rivations. Following this she work-
ed and taught for a period and
then returned to the University to
take her doctoral degree.
She had finished her disserta-
tion in 1939 when the Germans in-
vaded Czechoslovakia and took
over the University. However, the
300 page manuscript on "Develop-
ment of the Perfective Aspects in
Russian, Czech and Polish," which
took three and a half years to pre-
pare, was destroyed by the Ger-
mans and she never received her
degree.
* * *
AS SOON as possible she left
Czechoslovakia, coming to this
country in February, 1940. "I had
two advantages on coming here,"
she said. "In the first place I
knew English because my mother,
who was half Irish, had taught it
to me, and secondly I began trav-
eling immediately upon my arrival,
thus getting to know the country
and its people better."
For a time Miss Tolstoy gave
lectures throughout the country
on her grandfather and her ex-
periences under the German oc-
cupation. Then she wrote for a,
period and began teaching at
Cornell. She has also taught at
Columbia University, Middlebury
College and the University of
Indiana.
During the regular school year
she now teaches at New York City
Collegeand makes her home in
New York.

j1

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
... GRANDDAUGHTER
. . .
money and property was confis-
cated," she remarked.
In 1933 she graduated from the
University of Prague, having ma-

Subscribe to the
Summer
MICHIGAN DAILY

T'

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-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
SUMMER MOVING-Despite the high temperatures, workmen coolly edged the first of two houses
through the streets of Ann Arbor yesterday. The delicate moving job which required a police
escort, the uprooting of telephone poles, and the raising of telephone wires rolled the houses to their
new sites outside the city limits.

0

Associated Press Wire News
Sports, Campus and National
Complete News Coverage

GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY

announces

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A Series of Distinguished Films
in connection with the
University's special summer program
MODERN VIEWS OF MAN AND SOCIETY
July 7-- Kamerad Schaft (1931).
G. W. Pabst's classic based on the
Courrieres Mine Disaster
July 14- Cavalcade (1933)
with Clive Brook, winner of the Academy Award
July 21-- The Thin Man (1934)
Dashiell Hammett's comedy-melodrama,
with William Powell and Myrna Loy
July 28 - Intolerance (1916)
D. W, Griffith's searching panorama
of 2000 years of History

MISS TOLSTOY finds relaxa-
tion in her many hobbies. "My
most expensive one is record col-
lecting," she said. "My records
range anywhere from Dixieland
to opera." She favors Chicago Dix-
ieland over the New Orleans style.
An avid baseball fan, she con-
fessed that she was once quite a
soccer player. She also reads all
the "hot-rod" magazines and
likes watching car races.
In addition she enjoys swim-
ming, knitting, taking walks and
reading.
But right now she is very happy
to be on campus and enjoying her
work in the new Slavic languages
department.

Faculty Slates
First Concert
For Next Week
Music school faculty members
will take the entertainment spot-
light during the next month with
a series of concerts and recitals.
The first concert of the program
is scheduled for 8:30 p.m. July 1 in
the Rackham Lecture Hall. It will
feature Emil Raab, violinist and
Benning Dexter, pianist.
The Stanley Quartet will give
three concerts on July 8 and 22
and Aug. 5. The quartet is made up
of Gilbert Ross and Emil Raab,
violinists; Oliver Edel, cellist and
Robert Courte, violist. Clyde
Thompson, string bass, will join
the quartet during the first two
performances. The programs will
feature works by Haydn, Beethov-
en, Mozart, Bartok, Hindemith
and Milhaud.

Phil Murray Promises
Steel Workers' Victory

a

ByHELENE SIMON
Special To The Daily
GARY, Ind.-In the midst of
rolling newsreel cameras and glar-
ing klieg lights, United Steel
Worker President Phil Murray
promised the more than 10,000
strikers overflowing hot, smoky
Membrial Auditorium Sunday in
Gary, the home of the world's
largest steel mill: 'You will win!"
Murray ripped into the leaders
of the steel industry, calling them
a band of "professional culprits"
waging a campaign of misrepre-
sentation and slander unequalled
in the annals of history.
* * *
ALTHOUGH the steel strike is
going into its third week and the
steel workers are, no doubt, facing
financial difficulties, the white
haired union leader speaking with
a trace of a Scottish brogue was
greeted with overwhelming enthu-

COOL CAUL-
Today and Friday
rETAITE

Only $2.00
Phone 23-24-1

August 4- The Big Parade (1925)
World War I Drama, with John Gilbert
Aug. 11-The Last Command ('28)
The Aristocrat in America;
Emil Janning's First Hollywood Film
SHOWINGS BEGIN PROMPTLY AT 8:00 P.M.
IN THE RACKHAM AMPHITHEATER
MEMBERSHIP isby subscription, $2.50, for the entire
series. Checks and money orders should be made pay-
able to treasurer, Gothic Film Society and addressed
to 521 E. Jefferson, Ann Arbor. Please enclose stamp-
ed self-addressed envelope for membership card.

I

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Read Daily

Classifieds

happ ."C~
l~ ea r n
SLARRY PARKS
2ULZABETH TAYLOR

He May
4 B e

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Watching
Launder Your
Summer Cottons
To Sparkling
Perfection.

siasm as he warned his listeners
that they must be prepared to
"fight, struggle, sweat and sacri-
fice until the bitter end."
Fierce opposition to the Taft-
Hartley .Act-referred to by
union men as the "slave labor
act"-was expressed by huge
signs that dotted the auditor-
ium. "We, as steelworkers and
free American workers won't
work under Taft-Hartley in-
junction," "Taft-Hartley won't
produce steel" and "No con-
tract . . . no steel" faced Mur-
ray as he spoke.
The Big Six, the six major steel
companies hit by the strike, had
also spent last week busily pre-
paring for Murray's visit. Full
page advertisements representing
the steel industry's side appeared
regularly in the area's newspa-
pers. 'wo hundred thousand let-
ters 'vere sent to the strikers in
anticipation of Murray's speech.
S* s
THE MAJOR DISPUTE seems
to center around the issue of the
union shop. Under a union shop
provision a worker would be re-
quired to join the union within 30
days after he had been hired by
the steel industry. Union workers
would like to get rid of the "free
riders" who enjoy the benefits
procured by the union without
paying dues.
Gary's administration has
placed itself firmly behind the
strikers declaring itself to be
for labor. Mayor Peter Mandich
stated, "I am on the side of*
the working man, not on the
side of the absentee owner from
Ogden (wealthy suburb of
Gary) to Wail Street."
There is no one in this steel
producing area who does not feel
the effect of the strike-from de-
partment store owner to the corn-
er druggist. With the current high
cost of living steel workers have
found it hard to save and have
done a large part of their buying
on credit. Business has fallen off
considerably and a stack of bills
is delivered to many homes by
the mailman each morning.
THERE IS LITTLE HOPE here
that the steel strike will be set-
tled in the near future. Strikers
have resigned themselves to tak-
ing in their belts a few notches
and attempting to sit the strike
out.
The majority feel that their
cause is too just to budge one inch
from their demands. They have
every intention of fighting until
they emerge victorious over con-
quered management.

-Also-
GEORGE MURPHY
TALK ABOUT
A STRANGER

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510 East William

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PERSIAN MONOTONE PRINTED COTON
Wonderful sundress in an exotic persian print
for fashion and flattery...fine broadcloth
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Topping the full full skirt, the bodice is boned,
lined and bordered with pearl bead trim. Wear it
with or without Straps... completely washable! Black
or navy print on white background. Sizes: 10.20.

The University of Michigan League
Welcomes

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All Summer School Students

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THE CAFETERIA

for Luncheon, Dinner, and Sunday Breakfast and Dinner

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Open: Luncheon
Dinner

11:15 A.M. to 1:15 P.M.
5 P.M. to 7:15 P.M.

Sunday Breakfast 9 A.M. to 11 A.M.
Sunday Dinner 12 Noon to 2:30 P.M.

Ciane& St L uiI4
presents
A Summer Season of
OUTSTANDING FILMS
First Program Entirely in
TECH NICOLOR
The Doyly Carte Opera Co. u
in Gilbert and Sullivan's
THE
THEMIKADO
also_
WALT DISNEY'S

S. State off N. U.

IF YOU WRITE... WE HAVE IT
STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
Smith-Corona

DOZENS OF
OTHER COTTONS TOO.
* Junior Sizes 9-15
from $5.95
. Sizes 10-44 and 121-241/2
from $8.95

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THE ROUND-UP ROOM

for Breakfast, Luncheon and Snacks
Open: Monday through Thursday 7:15 A.M. to
Friday 7:15 A.M. to

LOOSE LEAF NOTEBOOKS
FOUNTAIN PENS AND PENCILS
FLUORESCENT LAMPS
BRIEF CASES
OFFICE FURNITURE
DESKS - STEEL FILES

Sheaffer Pens
Parker
Esterbrook
Waterman
Rust Craft Greeting Cards

5
5

P.M.
P.M.
P.M.

Saturday

7:15 A.M. to 2

Webster-Chicago Wire Recorders for sale or rent I

Closed Sundavs

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