100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 03, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

I

CELlINs
LOST AND FOUND I FOR RENT

American Hoopsters Defeat Russia, 36-25

LOST-Glasses, pink shell-rimmed. Call
Betsy Barbour, 22591-Ext. 308.
LOST -- During first week of summer
school - small gold watch initials
"MCT". Reward. Telephone Mary
Towle at 6722.
FOR SALE
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - IHitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, I arm Windsor, 1 comb
{« back Windsor. I tilt top table Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710.
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
HOUSE TRAILER-1 wall with built in
{ book case. 30 ft. .cozy-coach". has
natural wood finish throughout, elec-
tric refrigerator, electric hot water
heater. Very liberal terms. Can be
seen at 410 E. Jeff.
FOR SALE-Silver Tint Mouton Coat,
% length. Almost new. 1028 Stock-
well.
FOR, RENT
AVAILABLE - A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month Will rent for
4 summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.

NEAR CAMPUS - Unfurnished 4 room
ap't-tile bath, no heat nor utilities.
Has stove and refrigerator. No pets.
School-age child preferred. $95. Ph.
6465.
LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS with kit-
chen privileges for 3 or 4 men stu-
dents. Also, senior law student who
has occupied apartment for 2 years
wishes to share. Graduate preferred.
1026 Oakland, phone 2-8269.
MALE STUDENT to share basement
ap't; good location. Private room. $30
per mo. Ph. 5830.
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room 320 E.
Washington after 4 P.M.

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
ALTERATIONS - Woman's garments.
Prompt service. Catherine St. near
State. Call A. Graves, Ph. 2-2678.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V .
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Engin.
HELP WANTED
INTERVIEWERS for part time opinion
surveys. College background preferred,
not essential. Experience not neces-
sary. Answer fully. Box 18.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to Kallispell, Mont.
Leave about Aug. 11. Phone 7138.

Davies Tops Olympic Mark
In Final Breast Stroke Try

Major League
Standings,

BASEBALL ROUNDUP:
Tigers, Yankees Falter;
Surging A's, Giants, Win

(Continued from Page 1)
THE BIG championship basket-
ball game proved to be an anti-
climax. Previously in the round
robin tournament the United
States had romped away from the
Soviets, 86-58, and this time the
Russians came up with a baffling,
ball control plan.
"They played the only kind of
game that might have beaten us,"'
said Warren Womble, the U.S.
coach.
The towering Americans were
tense and off balance, but after
trailing near the start of the
second half, 20-21, the U.S. went
ahead to stay when Bob Kenney
sank two free throws.
Big Clyde Lovelette from Kan-
sas was high scorer with nine
points. Bob Kurland, a veteran
of the 1948 games, was held to
eight points.

THE UNITED STATES made 54
shots at the basket and sank 13,
for a mediocre average of .240.
Russia made 29 attempts, and sank
eight, for .274.
The United States now has
won every basketball champion-
ship since the sport was intro-
duced into the Games in 1936,
and has never lost an Olympic
game.
Americans and Russians shook
hands all around when the game
ended.
* ,* *

AMERICAN
W
New York ....59
Cleveland ....57
Boston .......55
Washington . .54
Philadelphia ..49
Chicago.......53
St. Louis ......43
Detroit.......35

LEAGUE
L Pct.
43 .578
45 .559
44 .556
47 .535
47 .510
51 .510
61 .413
67 .343

GB
2
21/2
4%/
7
7
17
24

AVAILABLE-2 single bedrooms for two 2
men, with kitchen, Phone 22038.

or 3 RIDERS WANTED-Driving to
Kansas City, Missouri. August 1 or 2.
References: exchange phone 2-3006 be-
tween 6 and 7 p.m.,

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main.

Read Daily Classifieds

mi

..I

(Political Advertisement)
TOlE TAXSPE NPERS _
.o - tiUBU
f4r
. IN&

JOHN DAVIES of Australia and
captain of last winter's University
of Michigan swimming team, won
the 200 meter men's breast stroke,
also in Olympic record time. His
mark of 2:34.4 erased the record
of 2:36 8 made by Jerry Holan of
the United States, and tied by
Davies in the preliminaries.
Bowen Stassforth, a Univer-
sity of Iowa product, was second,
and Herbert Kelin of Germany,
who holds the world record,
wound up third. Three Japanese
took the next three places-No-
buyasa Hirayama, Takayoshi,
Kajikawa, and Jiro Nagasawa.
Davies' victory ove rStassforth
was by three-tenths of a second,
a matter of a few scant feet. It
was a battle all the way but the
Australian, who was developed by
U.S. Olympic swimming coach
Matt Mann, touched home the
winner.
* * *
VALERIE Gyuenge of Hungary,
won the other women's swimming
final of the day, the 400-meter free
style. Her time of 5:12.1 set an-
other Olympic record, erasing the
mark of 5:16.6 made by Evelyn
Kawamoto of Honolulu and the
United States, in the preliminar-
ies. Miss Kawamoto finished third
in the finals, back of Eva Novak,
also of Hungary.
Carolyn Green from Fort
Lauderdale, Fla., was fourth and
Ragnhild 4Andersen-Hveger of
Denmark was fifth, with a third
Hungarian, Eva Szekely, sixth.
Miss Gyuenge laid back in
fourth place until the final 150
meters, and then came up with a
powerful winning surge.
* * s
H. VAN BLIXEN-FINECKE of
Sweden won the three day mili-
tary equestrian event individually
and Sweden won the three day
team title. Germany was second
and the United States a surpris-
ing third in the team standing.
A. Noyelle of Belgium won the
individual Olympic cycling road
race, with R. Rondelaes of Bel-
gium second and E. Ziegler of
Germany third. Belgium was an
easy team winner, and Italy was
second.
Today the present Games come
to an end with a glittering
equestrian competition in the
main stadiumthe Prix de Na-
tions, in which both team and
individual prizes are awarded.
Mexico, as usual, is favored.
In all 5,780 athletes from 70 na-
tions, counting Red China, have
competed here formally since
July 19.

* *
NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn .....64
New York ....60
St. Louis ......58
Philadelphia ..53
Chicago ......51
Boston .......41
Cincinnati ....41
Pittsburgh ....28

*
LEAGUE
L Pct.
30 .681
35 .632
43 .574
47 .530
48 .515
57 .418
60 .406
76 .269

TODAY'S GAMES
New York at St. Louis-(2)-
McDonald (2-3) and Sain (8-3)
or Kuzava (5-7) vs. Byrne (6-
10) and Garver (7-9).
Boston at Detroit-Brodowski
(5-3) vs. Houtteman (5-14).
Philadelphia at Cleveland-(2)
--Scheib (5-3) and Kellner (8-9)
or Newson (2-3) vs. Feller (7-11)
and Gromek (6-4).
Washington at Chicago-(2)-
Shea (9-3) and Marrero (8-5) vs.
Pierce (11-7) and Dorish (5-3).

GB
4 i2
9%/2
14
15%/
25
261
41

By RALPH RODEN
NEW YORK-P)-New York's
skidding Yankees took it on the
chin again yesterday, bowing, 11-
6, to the St. Louis Browns but
they remained two games ahead
in the American League pennant
race as the runner-up Cleveland
Indians lost an eleventh hour de-
cision to Philadelphia.
The rising Athletics nipped the
Indians, 6-4, scoring four runs in
the ninth inning to win. Boston's
third place Red Sox trounced De-
troit, 10-5, to pull to within 2%/
games of the Yanks. The fourth
place Washington Senators re-
mained 41/2 games astern by drop-
ping a 6-1 decision to the Chicago
White Sox.
* * *
IN THE National League, the
New York Giants, climbed to with-
in 4% games of Brooklyn's front-
running Dodgers. The Giants trip-
ped Pittsburgh, 4-3, in a game
that was called on account of rain
in the sixth inning. The Dodgers'
game against Chicago was called
because of rain in the fifth inning
with the Cubs ahead, 4-0. In the
only other day game, the Cincin-
nati Reds defeated the Boston,
Braves, 8-3.
The Browns jumped off to an
11-2 lead in five innings against
Yankee youngster Bill Miller and
Tom Gorman. Cass Michaels
collected four hits, drove in three
runs and scored three, while Jim
Dyck hammered in four runs on
a homer, double and single.
The Yanks now have lost ten of
their last 15 games.
Allie Clark touched off the A's
winning rally in the ninth with a
two-run pinch-hit homer off Early

TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Brooklyn - (2) -
Klippstein (7-8) and Kelly (2-5)
or Lown (3-7) vs. Erskine (10-3)
and Rutherford (2-2).
Pittsburgh at New York-(2)-
Friend (4-16) and Pollet (4-11) vs.
Gregg (0-1) and Lanier (5-6).
St. Louis at Philadelphia -
Chambers (4-2) vs. Simmons
(9-4).
Cincinnati at Boston - (2) -
Blackwell (2-11) and Church (2-6)
vs. Spahn (9-11) and Jester (1-2).

Bolt Takes Lead From Snead
In Tam O'Shanter Golf Meet

Wynn. The blow put the A's ahead,
4-3. Elmer Valo climaxed the up-
rising with a two-run single off
Bob Lemon. Gus Zernial clouted
his 18th homer in the eighth for
Philadelphia and Larry Doby
whacked his 22nd in the ninth for
Cleveland.
DOM DI MAGGIO'S grand slam
homer in the first inning started
the Red Sox torvictory over De-
troit. Winning pitcher Dizzy Trout
and rookie Dick Gernert also hom-
ered off loser Hal Newhouser.
Trout, making his first ap-
pearance in Detroit since he was
traded to the Red Sox, needed
help from ex-Tiger Al Benton
and rookie Ralph Brickner.
Eddie Robinson was the big
wheel in Chicago's triumph over
Washington. Robinson chased
home four runs on his 19th homer,
a double and single. Chuck Stobbs
held Washington to five hits in
posting his seventh victory.
* * *
ROOKIE OUTFIELDER Dusty
Rhodes saved the day for the
Giants. Rhodes homered with one
on and two out in the sixth inning
off Murry Dickson to wipe out a
3-2 deficit. Shortly after Rhodes
crossed home plate play was halt.
ed and 42 minutes later the game
was called. The homer was Rhodes'
eighth in his last 11 games at the
Polo Grounds.
The Dodger-Cub game was call-
ed with Chicago at bat in the fifth.
The Cubs had landed on Ben
Wade for four runs in the third
inning. Hank Sauer's three-run
homer was the big blow. It would
have been his 27th.
Lefty Harry Perkowski coast-
ed to his 10th victory as the Reds
supported his eight-hit pitching
with a 13-hit assault against
four Boston pitchers..Former
Brave Willard Marshall clinched
the game with a three-run hom-
er in the fourth off loser Jim
Wilson.
A five-run flareup in the eighth
inning-topped by a grand slam
homer by Connie Ryan-gave the
Philadelphia Phillies a 6 to 2 win
over the St. Leuis Cardinals last
night in a battle for third place in
the National League. The second
St. Louis tally came on a ntnth
inning home run by Solly Hemus
with no one on base.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
NT OF SPEECH
'lion with
G OF MUSIC
)pera by Otto Nicolai
end Mon. - 8SP.M.
0 - 1.20 - 90c
ir __ P rMr Tnn.1.

aOP'FrIlF T IlS HEW TAX IS ADOPTED,
IRE PEOPLE OF AEN ARDOR WILL PAY
A 30% TA ON ALL AMUSEMENTS!
Thruogh Charter Amendment No. 3, the City seeks the power to levy a 10% tax on amusements. It effects motion pictures,
plays, dances, athletic events, musical programs and other public events where an admission of 26c and over is charged.
YOU ALREADY PAY A 20% FEDERAL TAX ON ENTERTAINMENT. If this new City tax is adopted, it will mean that the
people of Ann Arbor pay a 30% tax on all amusements. Nothing will be exempt. It is an abuse of the taxing power. We be.
lieve there is no other city in the United States which penalizes it's citizens with such excessive taxation.

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - t,') - Sam Snead
blew to a 74 yesterday while Tom-
my "Thunder" Bolt slammed a 68
to grab the 54-hole lead of the
$30,000 All-American Golf Tour-
nament at Tam O'Shanter by one-
stroke with a 205, eleven under
par.
The race settled down to a two-
man duel for today's final between
Bolt, 33-year-old Durham, N.C.,
pro, and Snead, who entered the
third round with a five-stroke edge
and ended with a 206.
*.* * S
THEIR NEAREST pursuers were
Johnny Bulla, Verona, Pa., Henry
Ransom of Chicago, the 1950
"world" winner at Tam, and Cary
Middlecoff of Memphis, the lead-
ing money winner and defending
All-American champion.
These three were grouped at
210, five strokes off the pace-
a big bulge. to try to overcome
in a final 18 holes. Bulla carved
a 67 over Tam's 36-36-72 par
despite a bag full of 35 putts;
Ransom moved up with a steady
68 and Middlecoff slipped to
a 73.
Snead, who tapped the wrong
ball on the sixth green, found his
usually brilliant iron shots erratic
and zoomed to a pair of 37's after
a start of 67-65-132 for the first
two rounds.
IN THE All-American Amateur
Golf Tourney defending champion
Frank Stranahan erased an eight-
stroke deficit with a one-under-
par 71 to vault from ninth into a
four-way tie for the lead at the
54-hole mark.
Tied with the Toledo, Ohio,
Simon-pure veteran at 224, eight
over par, were Gene Coulter of
Richmond, Ind., John Guenther,
Jr., Reading, Pa., and Nello
Campagni of Highland Park, Ill.
The 36-hole leader, Jim Mc-
Keighen, Gary, Ind., steel worker,
wilted for a third-round 82, drop-
ping to a fifth-place tie with 227
with Ray Chamberlin of Wauke-
MICHIGAN
TOD®AY!il

gan, Ill., and Dave Logan of Chi-
cago. An amateur field of 22 fin-
ished the third round at par 36-
36-72 Tam O'Shanter course.
National Open Champion Lou-
ise Suggs matched men's par 72
to hold an eight-stroke lead at
the 54-hole mark of the All-
American Women's Open.
The petite Atlanta pro's 222 to-
tal was two strokes better than
the 224 at which four men ama-
teurs tied for first in their phase
of the All-American. 'Miss Suggs'
third-round effort was four un-
der Tam O'Shanter's women's
38-38--76 par.

of 1H6lE Asti oftCITY coUC
"A_ mFAi ie Ann Arbor Newsy 1 ~ti
thee t1i n i C
C~e~zt "tO to va . iet
sc t re . hta sch xn
o° A ' n V Xa s d e emor "a . h e o o f r t s Y o t t h e
thn f _.
=== '~rea. t"IO h
ate0 11 saiteC :

Read and Use
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

STOP THIS UNFAIR TAX!
It places on one segment of the population, the amusement-go-
er, a tax burden that should be shared by all the people. It is
just another consumer tax that falls heavily on the average man
and his family. Admission taxes are essentially a retail sales tax,
but instead of taxing at the usual retail sales tax of 3%, the
people of Ann Arbor will pay 30% on their entertainment,. or
ten times the usual retail sales tax.
WHY DEFY THE VOTERS?
Only last April the people of Alin Arbor decisively voted down
a City amusement tax. If people are to be encouraged to
exercise their rights and get out and vote, then City of.
ficials must be charged with the responsibility of accepting the
decision of the voters. Requiring people to vote on the same
question within a period of four months is open defiance of
the will of the people.

COOL

COOL

TODAY THRU TUESDAY
2a c URmy-F O .pr.,.ft
SGINGER ROGERS :..
FRED ALLEN
VICTOR MOORE
MARILYN MONROE
DAVID WAYNE t}<
EYE ARDEN
PAUL DOUGLAS
EDDIE BRACKEN
MITZI GAYNOR
LOUIS CALUERN
ZSAZSA GABOR
with JAMES GLEASON - PAUL STEWART
Written for the Sree and Produced by
~Y NUNNALLY JOHNSON =
-Directed by {
EDMUND GOULDING
1~~Adpted by DWIGHT TAYLOR 7t,

r

M+

Save Time and FLY
OBTAIN FULL INFORMATION
AND MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS
at

THE CITY'S BUDGET IS BALANCED!
WHY VOTE MORE TAXES ON YOURSELF?

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan