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July 31, 1952 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1952-07-31

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JMY 31, 1952

.r .. _ _ _ __ _
i

Six Senate
Seats Slated
For Change
WASHINGTON (AR) - With six
new faces already assured in the
Senate next January, a check to-
day showed this list could increase
prior to the final November elec-
tions.
Sixteen present senators who
are seeking re-election still face
primary election formalities or
other renomination tests. Some of
the 16 are unopposed.
SO FAR ONLY ONE Senator
who sought re-election has failed.
Sen. Brewster (R-Me) lost out to
Gov. Frederick G. Payne.
The death of Sen. McMahon
(D-Conn) boosted the list of
Senate seats to be filled this
year to 35. At least 32 places,
one third of the Senate, come up
every two years.
Three senators, Connally (D-
Tex), O'Conor (D-MD) and Sea-
ton (R-Neb) did not seek re-elec-
tion.
. McMahon's death means Con-
necticut will elect two senators
this fall. Sen. Benton (D-Conn) is
up for election to a full six-year
term and has been renominated.
NEBRASKA ALSO is electing
two senators. Sen. Butler (R-Neb)
seeks a new full term while the
balance of the term of the late
Sen. Wherry (R-Neb), filled by
Seaton through appointment, also
will be filled.
The sixth new face results
from the fact that both Vice
Presidential nominees are Sen-
ators - Sparkman (D-Ala) and
Nixon (R-Calif).
Thus the winning ticket will
lose a Senate seat. This is expected
F to be temporary, however, because
governors of both states are of the
same political party and so can
fill the vacancy by appointment
after the November election.
Party control of the Senate
will be at stake in the election.
With McMahon's death the
Democrats now have 49 seats,
the Republicans 46 with one
vacancy.
Of the 35 seats being filled, Re-
publicans now hold 20 and Dem-
ocrats 14 not counting the McMa-
hon vacancy which Republican
Gov. Lodge of Connecticut could
fill by appointment until the next
session in January.
Leonard Says
Williamts Put
Red in Office
By The Associated Press
Donald S. Leonard, campaign-
ing for the Republican nomina-
tion for governor, accused Gover-
nor Williams yesterday of naming
an attorney who recently worked
for the Communists to a prison
study committee.
But the attorney, former state
Senator Joseph Brown of Detroit,
indignantly denied he ever was
a Communist-or had any "Com-
munistic leanings whatsoever."
* * *
LEONARD'S CHARGE original-
ly was made during a television
panel discussion of the Southern
Michigan prison riots. Waving a
photostatic copy of an edition of
the Communist paper "The Work-
ers" before the camera, the for-
mer State Police Commissioner

pointed out an article on Brown's
appointment to a commission
studying the prison unrest.
The article said Brown was an
attorney who represented the
Communist party in the Reds'
fight against the Michigan
Trucks Act, which requires all
members of subversive groups
to register with State Police.
This was the same act held con-
stitutional yesterday by a panel of
three federal judges. The Commu-
nists had obtained an injunction
against its enforcement.
Acknowledging that he had been
hired by the Communists for that
particular battle, Brown said:
"Mr. Leonard made a correct
statement to the panel when he
said he didn't know me. People
who know me know I definitely
am not a Communist and never
have been.
Major Parties
To Convene
The two major political parties
will hold their fall county conven-
tions in the Courthouse on the
nights of august 12 and August
13.
The Republicans will convene
August 12 and the Democrats will
meet the following night. Both

Argentine Mourners

Philosopher
Decries Lack
Of 'Nerve'
(Continued from Page 1)

I

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WAITING TO PAY TRIBUTE--Mourning Argentines hold newspapers over their heads as protec-
tion from the rain as they stand in mile-long queue in a Buenos Aires street to pay final tribute to
their first lady, Eva Peron. Yesterday, Buenos Aires businesses returned to near normal activity al-
though official mourning will continue until August 25.
Dem Convention Called Compromise

should have slumbered every-
where except in one corner of the
world-Soviet Russia."
HE WAS WILLING to admit,
however, that it is "possible to be
both intelligent and a Marxist,"
provided one took- a more reason-
able view of history. This view,
as Prof. Hook saw it, must recog-
nize that only up to the point of
the rise of modern totalitarianism
did the mode of production play
the larger part in determining
large-scale shifts in cultural ac-
tivity.
The noted figure in contem-
porary thought stated that the
basic issue that divides the
world today does not lie in the
economic realm, but instead rep-
resents a "conflict between free-
dom and totalitarian dictator-
ship."
He continued that "what is at
stake today is not our foreign in-
vestments, but the survival of in-
dependent nations and free in-
stitutions."
Prof. .,Hook insisted that "the
notion of historical truth that
"construes history as nothing but
a branch of literature or fine art
used to point up a political tale
results in the cultivation of ab-
surdities which prepare the way
for mass atrocities."
Prof. Hook had no use for the
Marxist social philosophy which,
as he saw it, denied to mankind a
role in the creation of his own
destiny, art, science, philosophy,
and inventions.

The - Campus
1313
SHIRT SHOP SOUTH
Sost Famous Brands UNIVERSITY
hFgtm
The Following Items At .. .

* *1 *

i

By HARRY LUNN
The Democrats had a "conven-
tion of compromise," according to
Prof. Samuel J. Eldersveld of the
political science department.
Prof. Eldersveld and 14 faculty
members and graduate students
from the University political
science department were in Chi-
cago last week to study delegate
leadership#in the Democratic Na-
tional Convention. A similar study
was made at the GOP Convention'
several weeks ago.
4'* * *
ALTHOUGH there was an ap-
parent alignment between liber-
als and conservatives in the Re-
publican convention, it was harder
to perceive such an alignment in
the Democrats, he commented.
"On one hand you had the
extreme liberals such as Frank-
lin Roosevelt, Jr. and Hubert
Humphreys and on the other the
extreme conservatives represent-
ed by such men as Hugh White
of Mississippi. There was also
the mildly conservative Russell
group."
Prof. Eldersveld cited three vital
decisions which all turned out in

PROF. SAMUEL ELDERSVELD
* *. *
essence to be middle-of-the-road
positions:":
1) .The loyalty oath question
which resulted in a "right of
center" compromise in which the
northern liberals were defeated.

Foreign Students To Learn
About American Life at 'U'

By MIKE WOLFF
Forty-five students from ten na-
tions have arrived in Ann Arbor
to participate in a six-week orien-
tation program designed to ac-
quaint them with American cus-
toms and language.
The group, which includes nine
women, has been sent here by the
GOP .Fund
Plans Set
DETROIT- UP)--The Republi-
cans are planning to raise a war
chest of $4,800,000 for this fall's
campaign against the Democrats.
This was disclosed yesterday by
Arthur Summerfield, GOP Na-
tional Chairman.
Summerfield, who flew here
yesterday from Washington, said
as far as he knew the budgets will
not be changed from the original
estimates made some time ago.
This would mean that the Nation-
al Committee would have about
$3,000,000 at its disposal, the lim-
it permitted under federal sta-
tutes.
The other $1,800,000 would be
collected by the two Congres-
sional Campaign Committees.
The new chairman was enthu-
siastic about his party's chances
this fall.
"The Democrats have cooperated
by naming a hand-picked slate of
Trumanites as their candidates,"
Summerfield said.
He also expressed. satisfaction
with the progress the National
Committee was making in whip-
ping up party harmony after the
intra-party scrap at the Conven-
tion.
Kerr Gets $5,000
For Cancer Study
Prof. Donald A. Kerr of the
School of Dentistry yesterday was
announced the recipient of a $5,-
000 Republic Health Service grant
for training in cancer diagnosis
and treatment.

Institute of International Educa-
tion before moving on for a year's
study at other American universi-
ties, according to Prof. Robert
Lado, assistant director in the
English Language Institute and
director of the orientation pro-
gram.
* * *
COMING FROM as far as Pak-
istan and as near as Mexico, the
group contains students of nearly
every major field of study from
engineering to journalism.
One student, Haralambos Sta-
vrides from Greece, is also pre-
paring speeches for the Voice
of America at the request of
the Voice's Greek Department.
He will study engineering at the
University of Illinois this fall.
Prof. Lado said most of the stu-
dents hold Fulbright scholarships
to -the various universities under
funds transferred from the State
Department to the International
Education Institute for this pur-
pose. The remainder hold Ford
fellowships, he said.
* * *
THIS IS THE first summer the
University is taking part in the
program which has been going on
for the past three years and has
involved about 20 American uni-
versities, Prof. Lado added.
The aim is to orient the stu-
dents sufficiently to American
university and community life
so as to enable them to adjust
quickly at the schools where
they will study, he pointed out.
Before finishing up on Sept. 6,
the students, who are being hous-
ed in the South Quadrangle, will
have been through a series of lec-
tures and discussion groups on the
various aspects of the American
community.
THEIR PROGRAM will also in-
clude visits to local scenes of com-
munity activity such as schools,
industrial plants, farms and courts
to help them gain insight into our
society, according to Prof. Lado.
There will also be classes in
pronunciation for those who need

2). The platform which was a
compromise "left of center," but
is open to some interpretation by
both liberals and conservatives.
3). The nomination of Steven-
son and Sparkman. Stevenson was
interested in keeping the South
within the party and won out,
while the losing candidates Harri-
man and Kefauver wanted the
states to sign the loyalty pledge
even though it meant a possible
break in party unity. Sparkman's
nomination was a compromise
with the South.
* *
"THE DEMOCRATS made ev-
ery effort to maintain party un-
ity and get a concensus of the
party," he said. "This was not
true in the GOP Convention where
Eisenhower won without placating
the extreme conservatives."
Prof. Eldersveld also observed
that the Republican candidate
propaganda was far more bitter
than that used by the Demo-
crats. "Some GOP propaganda
was almost libelous," he added,
while Democrats never reached
this extreme.
Considering the Democratic
slate, he commented "they wound
up with an excellent candidate for
the Presidency and a fairly ade-
quate one for Vice-President."
In the future Prof. Eldersveld
feels that the Democrats are go-
ing to have to make some rules
changes if they plan to have the
conventions televised again in
1956. The unnecessary polling of
delegates and the use of unit rule
were two things he thought re-
flected unfavorably on the TV
audience.
He also believes that the
speech should be limited in length
and number. "There was a rule
made limiting seconding speeches
for the nominees, but this was not
followed."
FROM HIS experience at the
two party conventions Prof. Eld-
ersveld has gained two major im-
pressions
1). The major parties are
made up of a number of diverse
conflicting elements and the
convention goes through a great
task in attempting to unite them.
2). Real power is in the state and
local level, rather than in the na-
tional committees, revealing that
we have a decentralized political
system.
Another spectator at the Derino-
cratic Convention was Prof. James
K. Pollock, chairman of the poli-
tical science department. "Both
political parties have done excel-
lent jobs," he commented, "but
one sometimes cannot understand
how such results can come out of
the conventions."
Prof. Pollock also believes that
conventions should be changed
somewhat in character. "I am
hopeful that they will throw out
some of the ritual and speed the
process up a bit," he said.
"Perhaps they could hold them
later on in September when it
would not be so hot," he suggest-
ed. "This would lead to a more
business-like convention and a
shorter, snappier campaign."
Last Observing
Nigit Scheduled
The last in the summer series of
Visitors' Nights scheduled by the
department of astronomy will be
hell tomorrow on the fifth floor of
Angell Hall.
Dr. F. D. Miller of the astrono-
my staff will give an illustrated
talk on "Falling Through the Uni-
verse" at 8:30 p.m. in 3017 Angell
Hall. Following the talk the stu-
dent observatory on the fifth floor
of Angell Hall will be open until

- inC

S 1W

PRICES SLASHED' TO 50%/o

Officials

See

Higher Prices
For Future
WASHINGTON--)P)-Top price
officials sa d yesterday that even
though living costs already are at
a record high there is every indi-
cation that prices in many fields
will be heading upward soon.
These officials told a reporter
that dangerous threats to the
stabilization program are arising
from several quarters.
Among the factors likely to have
an important effect on prices and
on living costs, the officials men-
tioned:
1. The $5.20 per ton boost in
carbon steel prices "unquestion-
ably will mean higher prices for
products in which steel is used,
especially for machinery of all
types, construction and many
kinds of consumer goods," Price
stabilizer Ellis Arnall has said it
will be necessary to grant high-
er ceilings all along the line.
2. The possibility that the Of-
fice of Price Stabilization (OPS)
may have to grant a price boost to
aluminum producers and fabri-
cators. Aluminum makers have
been meeting with OPS this week
to present their demands for high-
er ceilings.
3. Wages have been moving up-
ward for thousands of workers in
a wide range of major manufac-
turing fields such as steel and
aluminum in recent weeks. Still
other wage boost demands are in
prospect, including coal miners.
The higher wages mean greater
purchasing power and growing
pressure on prices. Higher labor
costs also mean greater pressure
by producers for higher ceilings.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
week-end. Also plans for the Ohio State
Regatta thissweektand the Put-in-Bay
Regatta on August 7.
Coming Events
Final Graduate Mixer Dance of sum-
mer. Friday, August 1, 9-12 p.m. Music
by Earle Pearson, refreshments served.
Rackham Assembly Hall. Graduate stu-
dents and their friends invited.
Fresh Air Camp Clinic will be held
at the camp on Patterson Lake, Fri-
day, July 11, at 8:00 p.m. Dr. Rabiur-
vitch, Assoc. Prof. of Psychiatry: in-
Charge of Children's Service, Neuro-
psychiatric Institute, will be the dis-
cussant.
Masters Breakfast, honoringscandi-
dates for the master's degree Sunday,
August 3, 9:00 a.m., Michigan Union
Ballroom.
Friday and Saturday,rAugust 1 and 2
Architecture Auditorium

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