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July 30, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-30

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

PAGE THREE

CLASSIFIEDS

U.S.

Gains on Russians

in

Olympics

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Glasses, pink shell-rimmed. Call
Betsy Barbour, 22591-Ext. 308.
FOR SALE
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, I arm Windsor, I comb
back Windsor. i tilt top table Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710.
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
HOUSE TRAILER-1 wall with built in
book case. 30 ft "cozy-coach", has
natural wood finish throughout, elec-
tric refrigerator, electric hot water
heater. Very liberal terms. Can be
seen at 410 E. Jeff.
PRESCRIPTION DESK and Drug Coun-
ter with adjustable shelves and draw-
ers; instrument case with glass sides
and door and heavy removable glass
shelves. Typewriter desk. Sectional
bookcase. Inquire, H. H. Loveland,
M.D. 220 East Chicago Blvd., Tecum-
seh, Mich.
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE - A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month. Will rent for
summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.

FOR RENT

ATTRACTIVE APT near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept.15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evetiings.
LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS pith kit-
chen privileges for 3 or 4 men stu-
dents. Also, senior law student who
has cccupied apartment for 2 years
wishes to share. Graduate preferred.
1026 Oakland, phone 2-5269.
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room 320 E
Washington after 4 P.M.
AVAILABLE-2 single bedrooms for two
men, with kitchen. Phone 22038.
BUSINESS SERVICES

Yanks Score Major Upset
In 800-Meter Swim Relay

OPEN SEASON ON MANAGERS:
Sewell Becomes Fifth Ousted Pilot

ALTERATIONS -
Prompt service.
State. Call A.

Woman's garments.
Catherine St. near
Graves, Ph. 2-2678.

COOL

COOL

STARTS TODAY
MARLENE DIETRICH
ARTHUR KENNEDY

TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main.
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
12 blocks east of East Engin.
HELP WANTED
INTERVIEWERS for part time opinion
surveys. College background preferred,
not essential. Experience not neces-
sary. Answer fully. Box 18.
TRANSPORTATION
3 WISH TO SHARE expenses, driving, to
New England, preferably Maine, about
August 16th. Write Box 19.
TO CALIFORNIA-Frisco, Fresno area.
Lv. Aug. 16, return Sept. 17. Refer-
ences. Ph. 5539.
2 OR 3 RIDERS wanted. Driving to Kan-
sas City, Missouri, August 1 or 2. Ref-
erences exchanged. Phone 2-3006 be-
tween 6:00 and 7:00 P.M.
RIDERS WANTED to Kallispell, Mont.
Leave about Aug. 11. Phone 7138.
2 or 3 RIDERS WANTED-Driving to
Kansas City, Missouri. August 1 or 2.
References: exchange phone 2-3006 be-
tween 6 and 7 p.m.
WANTED TO RENT
DAILY EDITOR desires 3 or 4 room fur-
nished apartment, for fall semester.
Call 3-0697.

By TED SMITS
HELSINKI- (R) - The United
States gained ground on Russia
yesterday in the unofficial battle
for Olympic team honors, boosting
its total to 440 against the Soviet's
5141/2.
America scored 15 points, ten of
which came in a spectacular vic-
tory over Japan in the men's 800-
Meter Relay in which Jim McLane
of Yale outswam Teijiro Tanikawa
in the home stretch. The United
States quartet set a new Olympic
record of 8:31.1, eleven seconds
faster than Japan's old mark.
*, * ~
RUSSIA SCORED only 12 points
during the day. If the United
States wins as expected in swim-
ming, and picks up points in box-
ing and equestraian events as
well, it might overhaul Russia by
a slender margin before the
;ames end Aug. 3.
Olympic swimming records
took the same kind of pounding
that track and field marks re-
ceived last week.
Geertje Wielma of the Nether-
lands did 1:13.8 in a 100-Meter
heat, as compared to the old
mark' of 1:14.3; Jean Boiteux,
France, did the 400-Meter Free
Style in a heat in 4:33.1, as against
the old record of 4:38.6, and Eva
Zekely of ungary won the Women's
200-Meter Breaststroke final in
2:51.7. The Olympic record was
2:54.
THE 800-METER swimming re-
lay was the blue ribbon event of
the day.
Japan picked up a slight lead
on the first leg when Hiroshi
Suguki edged Wayne Moore of
Yale by a length. Japan's great
Yoshihiro Hamaguchi increased
the lead to three lengths mid-
way in his race against Bill-
Woolsey of Honolulu, but in the
home stretch Woolsey cut it
down to a half length.
Then Ford Konno, another pro-
duct of Hawaii and Ohio State,
got a fast start on Toru Goto and
narrowed the margin. The two
anchor men, McLane and Tani-
kawa, started off with the Japan-
ese only slightly ahead.
*D t *
UP AND DOWN the 50-meter

pool they battled as the crowd of
10,000 went wild. On the third
turn McLane got a bad kick and
Tanikawa edged ahead. At the
final turn they were even, but in
the last 50 meters the 21-year-old
American dug in and inched pain-
fully past the Japanese to win by
two and one half seconds:
On the basketball front the
United States ran up the high-
est score of the games in beat-
ing Chile 103-55. The Peoria
Caterpillar portion of the squad
rested most of the time as the
University of Kansas combina-
tion took over, with big Clyde
Lovelette setting the pace with
25 points. As an aftermath of
Monday's basketball riot in
which Vincent Farrell, an Am-
erican referee, was set upon
and knocked unconscious, the
Uruguayan players were strip-
ped of all Olympic privileges.
They were Wilfredo Pelaz and
Carlos Rossello. Willard Griemc
of Denver, President of the In-
ternational Basketball Federa-
tion, said they probably will be
banned from amateur basket-
ball for life.
In other games Uruguay, minus
its banished players, outclassed
Bulgaria 65-54. Russia came back
from its trouncing at the hands
of the United States Monday to
beat Brazil 54-49. And Argentina,
now the main threat to U.S. cage
supremacy, routed France, 61-52.

NEW YORK ) - Tommy'
Holmes . .. Rogers Hornsby ..
Eddie Sawyer . . . Red Rolfe ...
Luke Sewell.
The Major League season is
only slightly beyond middle age
and already those five managers
who started the campaign with
shining eyes and resolve have
found the path of glory leads but
to unemployment. A football
coach's job would seem to be the
acme of security compared to that
of a baseball pilot.
* * *
SEWELL, a handsome, person-
able guy, is the latest to leave the
scene, and personally we feel a

Name Sid! Abel of Red Wings
To Hawks' Player-Coach Job

CHICAGO-(W)-Sid Abel, 12-
season star for the Detroit Red
Wings, yesterday was named play-
ing coach of the Chicago Black-
hawks who have finished last in
five of their past six National
Hockey League seasons.
Abel replaces Ebbie Goodfellow,
who resigned several weeks ago
with another season still remain-
ing in his three-year contract.
ABEL, THE Hawks' first playing
coach, received a two-year con-
tract. President Bill Tobin of the
Blackhawks said Abel was sought

as a bench coach, but suggested,
himself, that he could help the
club by playing.
Abel, 34, plays center and five
times since he joined the Red
Wings in 1938 was among the
NHL's top 10 scorers. In 1949,
he won the Hart Trophy for be-
ing most valuable to his club.
Abel was the league All-Star
center in 41948-49 and in 1949-50
and was All-Star alternate in 19-
50-51 and 1941-42. is best scoring
season was 1949-50 when he fin-
ished second with 69 points.

tinge of regret as from the stand-
point of a kibitzer we feel that
the troubles of his Cincinnati
Reds weren't due to his leader-
ship.
The Reds, who always look
great in spring training and
don't do so well once they
start to play for keeps, didn't
figure to finish much higher
than they are right now.
Particularly if Ewell Blackwell
didn't have a good year, which
he hasn't had to date. Blackie has
been a little frayed, although in
his last outing he showed signs of
returning to form.
* * *
THE NATIONAL League right
now is one up on the American in
manager departures, with Sew-
ell, Holmes and Sawyer all from
the Senior circuit.
Rolfe and Hornsby, the Amer-
ican League representatives,

were pilots of the Tigers and
Browns, which rank 1-2, read-
ing from the south end of the
standings at present.
Hornsby is the only one of the
five to depart for any other rea-
son than that the club wasn't do-
ing so well. The Rajah and his
boss, Bill Veeck, just didn't see
eye to eye, a situation which usual-
ly is fatal to an employe.
But the fact that the Rajah and
Veeck didn't agree failed to stop
the one-time National League top
slugger from quickly landing an-
other managerial job. There were
reports that Hornsby would join
the Jankee organization but he
ended up with Sewell's job at Cin-
cinnati.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

SID ABEL
... Blackhawk boss
* * *

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
neering: architecture, civil, electrical
and mechanical, all phases of Busi-
ness Administration and Economics,
all Public Health and welfare posi-
tions and positions for which a degree
is not required. Bulletins describing
the work and requirements may be seen
at the Bureau of Appointments.
A publishing firm in Ann Arbor has
two openings in its office for young
women. One is for a receptionist and
typist, the other is for a stenographer
for the sales department.
The Celanese Corporation of America,
Cumberland, Maryland, has a very at-
tractive offer to, make to persons quali-
fying as a Boiler House Superinten-
dent. The position requires a B.S. de-
gree in Mechanical Engineering and
experience in power plant operation.
Refrigeration plant experience is also
desirable.
The Young Women's Christian Asso-
ciation, Fort Wayne, Indiana, has an-
nounced two vacancies in its staff. One
is for a program director for young
adult work, the other for an assistant
physical education director.
The State of Michigan has announced
a Civil Service examination to be giv-
en for an Industrial Health Engineer
III and for an Industrial Health En-
gineer IV.

Full details, occupational informa-
tion, application blanks may be had at
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, or by calling
extension 371.
Approved Student Sponsored Social
Events for the coming week-end:
Friday, August 1-Betsy Barbour, Phi-
Delta Phi.
Saturday, August 2-Alpha Omega Pi,
Phil Delta Phi.
Lectures
Wednesday, July 30
Physics Symposium. 1400 Chemistry
Building. "A Review of Recent Work
in Microwave Spectroscopy" Charles H.
Townes, Columbia University, 10:00
a.m.: "Recent Developments in the
Shell Model Theory of Nuclear Struc-
ture," Eugene Feenberg, Washington
University, 11:00 a.m.%
Linguistic Forum. "Linguistic Field
Studies." Ernest N. McCarus, Instruc-
tor in Near Eastern Studies. 1:00 p.m.,
Michigan League dining room.
Speech Assembly. "Costume as Com-
munication," Lucy Barton, Department
of Speech, University of Texas. 3:00
p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Symposium on Heat Transfer. "Com-
parison of Temperatures in Solid Bodies

and Their Scaled Models." Ruel V.
Churchill, Professor of Mathematics.
3:00 p.m., 311 West Engineering Build-
ing.
Modern Views of Man and Society.
"Law, Freedom; and Human Action in
History." Sidney Hook, Chairman, De-
partment of Philosophy, Washington
Square College, New York University.
4:15 p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall.
Doctoral Examination for Corinne A.
Crogan, Education: thesis: "Preferences
and Practices of Teachers of Women's
Golf in Selected Colleges andWUniver-
sities," Wednesday, July 30, East Coun-
cil Room, Rackham Building, at 2:00
p.m. Chairman, M. E. Rugen.
Doctoral Examination for Orlando
Bonilla-Soto, Bacteriology; thesis: "Se-
lective Lysis of Brucella Cultures by
an Obligate Bacteria-Feeding Amoeba,"
Thursday, July 31, 1564 East Medical
(Continued on Page 4)

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NOW SHOWING

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"MERRY MAVERICKS"
"HAPPY VALLEY"
Cartoon
LATEST WORLD NEWS

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CLASSIFIEDS

I MARRIED
A WITCH!

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LOW EST
PRICES!
SALE
ALL WEATHER
JACKETS
$2.66
Water Repellent
SALE
RAYON
SHARKSKIN
PANTS
$3.88
SALE
PICTURE
"T"SHIRTS
79C
Assorted Colors
SALE
NAVY TYPE
"T" SHIRTS.
49c
SALE
Men's & Boys' Black
MOCCASINS
$2.99
Sizes: 3 to6, 6to 12

ri

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MEN'S

SHOES

I

I

0

We

are continuing

Our Gigant

ic Sale
of this

of Mer
week.

I

Shoes

the rermainder

If you haven't already taken ad-

vantage of our fine buys, you still

have

time. Nothing

reserved,

nothing held

BEAT THESE BUYS
" Men's Golf Shoes .. 8.00
" Men's Fabric Shoes . 4.95
e Men's Nylon Mesh
Dress Shoes ....#..7.00
* Men's Sample Shoes
Sizes 7C and 7%2C . 5.00

I-

I

1.

All shoes taken from our regular
Sizes to fit everyone-5C to 14D.
ALL SALES FINAL

Many More
Buys!...

Come and U
i A ..*14

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