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July 26, 1952 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-26

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I

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1952

4

Campus Keeps

Tabs on Democratic Convention

-

* # * #

* * *

Most students stayed near television screens and radios yester-
day, keeping close tabs on the slow laborious process of naming a
Democratic presidential candidate.
Political science majors and teachers had a field day doping out
convention results and "analyzing" voting trends and shifts. Other
political pundits made rash predictions and bets as they attempted
to pick a winner on the basis of the confused early ballots.
THURSDAY night's exciting session which kept newscasters
and listeners in a continual stew because of the numerous maneuvers
was followed to the bitter end by
V I~ i* $jll~IM || I many Ann Arborites.

SOME LISTENED UNTIL THE WEE HOURS OF THE MORNING A FEW STUDIED

Yesterday morning teachers
and students alike had difficulty
in staying awake through lec-
tures, for the hectic meeting
lasted until 2 a.m. yesterday.
Class cutting and bolts were the
main order of the day.
Many instructors let their
classes out early yesterday after-
noon so they could watch the first
roll call votes. Lucky journalism
students adjourned to their news-
room to watch proceedings over a
television set.
The Daily, hoping to get a first
ballot tally early yesterday morn-
ing, went one hour past deadline
only to have the convention ad-
journed. The Ann Arbor News,
which got the Eisenhower nomina-
tion just on deadline two weeks
ago, missed the Democratic de-
cision yesterday.
* * *
THROUGHOUT the afternoon
and evening, most students forgot
about homework. The voting may
have been tedious, but it was
still exciting to watch the battle
on the convention floor as parti-
san delegates held out for their
choice of nominee.
Groans went up in the Union
and all over campus when tele-
vision viewers had to sit through
the long polls of individual dele-
gations. Out in the Arboretum,
couples combined politics with
sunbathing as they took advan-
tage of the fine weather.
And finally, when the balloting
was all over and the victor had
emerged, celebrations or gloom
settled over campus Democrats
while Republicans began to figure
their chances in November.
DAILY PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by Harry Lunn
Pictures by Jack Berkstrom

A

PROF. SLOSSON AND DAUGHTER CHALK UP THE GOOD NEWS DAILY EDITOR MIKE WOLFF WAITED IN VAIN
THURSDAY NIGHT

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EVEN IN THE ARBORETUM POLITICALLY CONSCIOUS STUDENTS KEPT TABS ON
THE NOMINATION FIGHT

THE UNION WAS CROWDED WITH STUDENTS WHO FORGOT BOOKS AND CLASSES AS THE DEMOCRATS BATTLED IT OUT

Board Gives
Four Leaves
Of Absencet
(Continued from Page I)

REVOLUTIONARY:
Science 'Labs' Initiated
On University Campus

College, serving as chief of labora-'
tory division, special project, Pine'
Bluff Arsenal, for the Chemical
Corps.
* * *
DR. HAROLD Richard Black-
well as assistant professor of phys-
iological optics in the Department
of Ophthalmology in the Medical
School on a half-time basis, effec-
tive July 1, 1952. He has been
director of the Vision Research
Laboratory at the University of
Michigan since 1946.
The Regents also granted four
leaves of absence.
President Hatcher said that two
members of the faculty had been
granted leaves for a year. Prof.
William P. Alston of the philoso-
phy department, was given leave
for the academic year of 1952-53.
He has been invited to be a visit-
ing lecturer at the University of
California at Los Angeles.
KENNETH A. STONE, instruc-
tor in electrical engineering, was
given leave for a calendar year,
Sept. 1, 1952 to Sept. 1, 1953. He
plans to gain practical experience
in the field of closed loop systems
control.
Mrs. Kamer Aga-Oglu, associate
curator of the Division. of the
Orient in the Museum of Anthro-
pology, was granted leave from
Aug. 15, 1952 to May 15, 1953.
She has been given a grant by
the Board of Governors of the
Horace H. Rackham School of
Graduate Studies to cover travel-
ing expenses for a research project
dealing with special studies on
Far Eastern ceramics in the Uni-
versity Museums and in private
collections in England, Sweden,
Holland, Belgium, France and
Turkey.

Most freshmen, studying their
distribution requirements, a r e
rather disgusted to discover that
they must enroll in three semes-
ters of a laboratory science.
This has not always been the
case. Before 1857 no school in the
nation taught any science under
the laboratory system. However,

'U' Regents
Appoint New
Committees
The Board of Regents approved
appointments to five committees
yesterday.
President Harlan Hatcher, who
announced the Regents' action,
was included in the membership of
one of the committees. The Uni-
versity's top executive was one of
seven members appointed to the
executive committee of the board
of directors of the Alumni Associa-
tion,
NEW MEMBERS of the board
will include: vice president and
Dean of Faculties Marvin L. Nie-
huss, vice president W. K. Pier-
pont and Prof. Dudley M. Phelps
of the School of Business Admin-
istration.
Dean George G. Brown of the
College of Engineering and Prof.
Howard B. Lewis, chairman of
the Department of Biological
Chemistry in the Medical School
were reappointed to four-year
terms on the executive commit-
tee of the Michigan Memorial-
Phoenix Project.
Dean Willard C. Olson of the
School of Education was appointed
to the executive committee of the
Institute for Social Research.
* * *

i nthat year a Chemical Labora-
tory Building was erected on the
University campus.
THE OLD chem labs were hous-
ed in a grey brick building near
the south-east corner of the cam-
pus. They now are a part of the
University's pharmacology de-
partment, sharing the aging struc-
ture with the Department of Eco-
nomics.
Prof. Albert B. Prescott pre-
sided over the laboratory until
his death in 1905, but credit for
the idea and supervision of the
actual building belongs to Prof.
Silas H. Douglas, then assist-
ant to the professor of chemis-
try and who later became pro-
fessor of chemistry'in the Medi-
cal School. All other courses in
the Medical School were, at that
time, being taught by lecture
and demonstration only, as they
were in every other school of
medicine.
Students of anatomy, or any
other science, never handled an
instrument or a specimen unless
they were fortunate enough to as-
sist one of their instructors.
THE FACILITIES of the old
Chemical Laboratory, constructed
at a cost of $3,450, were unexcelled
at that time. Fifty-four years later
the new Chemistry Building-now
referred to as the old Chemistry
Building-was erected at a cost of
$250,000 and the chemical lab-
oratory facilities of the University
were again unsurpassed.
The laboratory system pro-
ceeded through periods of pro-
gress and inconveniences. In the
labs were initiated such now
essential practices as chemical
examination of drinking water
and licensing of prarmacists.
As for inconvenience-in 1901 a
great step was taken when the

Sill Requests
Housig for
Aged Persons
Housing projects for aged per-
sons to be set up as corporations
and sponsored by wealthy founda-
tions were advocated yesterday by
Charles H. Sill as a means of solv-
ing part of the problem of pro-
viding dwellings for persons more
than 65 years old.
Sill, a lecturer in real estate in
the University Etension Service,
spoke to some 500 persons from
throughout the nation attending
the University's fifth annual con-
ference on aging which will end
today,
"ANYONE WHO wished shelter
in such a project would purchase
shares of stock in the corpora-
tion," he explained. "The size of
unit available for shelter would
depend upon the number of shares
purchased. These units would
range in size from bachelor units
to one or two room apartments.
Sill indicated that such arrange-
ments would include an infirm-
ary staffed by a doctor and nurse,
a large lounge and a cafeteria.
In a talk on financing rental
housing for older persons, Clar-
ence C. Klein, president of the
National Association of Housing
Officials, Pittsburgh, said that,
practically no governmental
funds have been specifically
channelled for this "highly
worthwhile" purpose.
A solution for finding dwellings
for older persons was indicated by
Dr. Raphael Ginzberg of the Cher-
okee, Iowa Mental Health Insti-
tute. He reported that research on
housing arrangements for elderly
persons in rural districts and small
and medium sized cities in Iowa
reveal that:
* * *
"REMODELING or rebuilding
cottages as houses for older per-
sons was a comparatively inek-

Which End?
LONDON, ()-The House of
Commons tied itself into a
knot yesterday trying to decide
which is the end of a piece of
string.
Laborite George .Brown said
the Conservative government's
subsidy on calves would affect'
the price cycle at the "begin-
ning end." When the Conserva-
tives wanted to know which
end that was, Brown replied
it was like a piece of string: the
end you start with is the "be-
ginning end" and the other the
"final end."
That brought up the ques-
tion of the "middle end."
Brown, struggling hard to clar-
ify his meaning, said the "final
end is the finish." That fin-
ished the argument.
D octor Tells
Role of Aged
Mentally_Ill
Not all mentally disturbed -old
persons are incurable, according
to Dr. Winfred Overholser, su-
perintendent of St. Elizabeth's
Hospital, Washington, D.C.
Dr. Overholser spoke at a din-
ner during the fifth annual con-
ference on aging which has the
theme "Housing the Aging."
THE DOCTOR, an official of
one of the nation's largest insti-
tutions for the aged mentally ill,
pointed out that "when an old
person becomes mentally dis-
turbed, it doesn't -necessarily
make him a 'has-beener.'"
However," he continued, "in
spite of this fact, there is an
unfortunate increasing attitude
among children to send aged
relatives off to mental institu-
tions when such persons show
the slightest mental disturb-
ance.
"This, of course, is tremendous-
ly unfair to the aged person who

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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw. Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.- Sunday Morning Services.
July 27-Truth
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the.
morning service.
Sunday Evening Services will be discontinued during
the months of July and August.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased,
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister-Leonard A. Parr
Student Work-Marilynn Paterson,
Robert Inglis
Director of Music-Harold Haugh
Organist--Howard R. Chose
10:45 A.M.: Junior Church Chapel.
10:45 A.M.' "is Religion A Neurosis?" Dr. Wil-
bert J. McKeachie of U. of M. Psychology
Dept. will be the guest speaker.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
10:45 A.M.: Worship. "Two Words I Would Add
to Paul's Chapter on Love." Dr. Large preach-
ing.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper. Canterbury Club
will be our guests.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and program. Rev. Bruce
Cooke, Chaplain to Episcopal sudents, will
1n,,1 N 1y., - AA:--:-- , . r'I

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHORCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Corner Hill & Tappan Sts.
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "What is Your Answer to Christian-
ity?" by the Rev. Joseph Smith.
Music: Mrs. Howard Farrar, organist; Mr.
Howard Farrar, choir director.
STUDENT GUILD: Guild Summer Reunion . .
cars leaving Guild House for Bishop Lake at
2.00 P.M. Food, recreation and worship.
Marilyn Paterson and Robert Inglis, directors.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30 A.M.; Service, with Holy Com-
munion. Sermon by the pastor, "Living Altru-
istically."
Sunday at 5:30 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper and Program. Discussion,
"The Multiplicity of Denominations."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Rev. J. G. Van Dyke, Mich. Director of Church
Extension, Christian Reformed Church, will
preach.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. J. G. Van Dyke
will speak.

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FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine
The Reverend Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector

ii

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