100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 18, 1951 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18, 1951

,s

FOUR WEDNESDAY, JULY 18, 1951 1.

TIRST AMERICAN TOUR:
Young Ireland Theatre Company To Appear Tonight
By HARRIET TEPPERMAN iM
As the professional feature at- #-
raction of the summer's theatre ,~
nertainment, the speech depart-
ient will present the Young Ire-
and Theatre Company at 8 p.m. t4
onight in the Lydia Mendelssohn
'heatre.
On tour of this country for the .
irst time, the company has as-
er:bled a repertoire of seven mo- ,
lern Irish dramas.
"WORDS UPON the Window-
ane," by Williams Yeats, is a
ong one-act play which depends <f
ipon the portrayal of a seance
or its unique dramatic effect. Al-
hough the play actually concerns
swift and Vanessa, the aulience .
neets these characters o n 1 y
hrough the control of the medi-

COLLEGE ROUND-UP:
Summer Enrollments
Fail To Drop Sharply

Following the Yeats drama
will be "The Shadow of a Gun-
man," by Sean O'Casey Both
plays will be presented on the
same theatrical bill of fare to-
night and tomorrow night..
Conisidered the author''s favor-
ite, "The Shadow of a Gunman"
is a tough bitter tragedy of Dub-
lin slum life and Ireland's strug-
gle for independence.
AT TWO MATINEES to be giv-
en at 3:15 p.m. tomorrow and Sat-
urday, the Players will present
"In the Shadow of the Glen," by
J. M. Synge, Yeats' "Purgatory,"
and "The Rising of the Moon" by
Lady Gregory.
The program will shade from
the spirited comedy of Synge's
peasant play to Yeats' wrathful
comments on modern Ireland and
civilization as a whole.

By EVA SIMON
The expected sharp drops in en-
rollment have failed to materialize
at most universities, a survey
conducted by the New .York Times
shows.
A majority of the fifty repre-
sentative colleges and universities
covered by the survey are just
about "holding their own" this
summer. Though a number re-
ported an enrollment loss ranging
from five to ten per cent, this is
Bunting Given
Defense Post
Retired dean of the dentistry
school Russell W. Bunting, will
coordinate dental activities in the
national civil defense program.
His acceptance of the Federal
Civil Defense Administration as-
signment was announced yester-
day.
Past president of the Interna-
tional Association of Dental Re-
search, Dr. Bunting was a member
of the University dental faculty
from 1904. He served as dean from
1937 until his retirement furlough
began last month.
City Water Rates
Rise 35 Percent
City water rates will be raised
an average of 34% percent and
sewer service will cost an average
of 11'/2 per cent more Saturday,
Sept. 1, the Ann Arbor City Coun-
cil ruled Monday night.
Increasing the rates is designed
mainly to cover boosts in opera-
tional costs. The average house-
holder's water ,bill will be hiked
about $5 annually, and the city
will gain about $105,500 from the
increases.

almost counter-balanced by the
institutions that showed a gain.
Many colleges reported a spurt
in v e t e r a n enrollments, al-
though, on the whole, there are
fewer veteran students this sum-
mer than last.
Reason is that July 25 is the lat-
est date for enrollment under the
GI education bill. After that, only
veterans who have already en-
rolled can continue to receive GI
funds.
A * *
TEXAS MEN now have a new
achievement to boast of.
University of Texas officials
announced that individual
phones will be placed in each
room in four of the women's dor-
mitories next September.
The move came as a result of
continued complaints of the dis-
proportionate number of students
who have to use each phone.
* * *
BROOKLYN COLLEGE will of-
fer courses leading to a diploma
in television beginning next Sep-
tember.
Part of the curriculum will con-
sist of instruction in the actual
operation of the modern electronic
equipment found in the television
studio, in programming and in
production.
A unique educational struc-
ture, which may serve as a mo-
del for adult education centers
in the United States, will soon
be unveiled at Michigan State
College.
To be known as the Kellogg
Center for Continuing Education,
the $2,000,000 building is designed
to accommodate the thousands of
Michigan residents who come to
the campus each year for special
courses and conferences.

QUALITY FOOD
at Popular Prices
OPEN DAILY (except Monday)
11 :00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
HARMONY Restaurant
Liberty at Fourth Avenue

1

CAISHMERE

,

At

ETERNAL RROBLEM-Maureen Halligan, Nora O'Mahony, Gran'ma O'Shannon a n d Seamus
O'Gorman are shown in a scene from "Riders to the Sea," one of the plays to be presented by the
Young Ireland Theatre Company tonight through Saturday night. The troupe is being sponsored
here on campus by the speech department, and will give two matinees in addition to nightly per-
formances.

I
I.

Scheduled to be presented
Friday and Saturday evenings
are "Riders to the Sea," by
Synge, and "The Player Queen,"
by Yeats.
The first is one of the most fa-
nous of all modern Irish plays. It
ells of the womenfolk of a simple

* ' *
Aran fishing village whose tra-
gedy lies in their monotonous and
terrible relation to the sea.
A satire, fantasy and farce, "The
Player Queen" mocks at certain
of Yeats' own theories regarding
the human personality.

* *

A * *

Prof. Eric Bentley of Indiana
University, director-sponsor of the
Players in their American tour,
will lecture at 4:15 p.m. today in
the Architecture Auditorium on
"The Modern Irish Theatre." His

lecture is sponsored by the English
department .
Tickets for all performances of
the Irish Players may be purchas-
ed from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily and
until 8 p.m. on performance nights
at the Mendelssohn box office.

'i

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

.3i

1. Full Fashioned Sleeves
2. Full Fashioned Shoul-
der Seams and all
seams
3. Full Fashioned Double
Loop Neck
4. Fces Shak buttons

arldey, Kefauver To Highlight Series

Vice-President Alben W. Bark-T

* * *

* * s

ley, will deliver the first address
of the 1951-52 Lecture Course, ac-
cording to Prof. Karl G. Brandt,
secretary of the University Ora-
torical Association.
Other lecturers in the series will
include Sen. Estes Kefauver, Bri-
an Aherne, Alan Villiers, Charles
Laughton, Roscoe Drummond and
John Mason Brown.
VICE-PRESIDENT Barkley, ve-
teran statesman in the nation's
capital, will present the human
side of the problems facing Am-
erica in an address entitled "Cross-
roads of Democracy" Oct. 18.
Sen. Kefauver's lecture, slated
for Oct. 25, Is entitled "The Ci-
tizen's responsibility for
Crime." The Tennessee Demo-
crat was chairman of the Sen-
ate Crime Committee which in-
vestigated nation-wide crime.
As the third celebrity in the
series, Brian Aherne, noted stage,
screen, radio and television actor,
will present a dramatic program
Nov. 28.
NOV. 19 Alan Villiers will bring
his unusual story in motion pic-
tures, "The Quest of the Schooner
Argus," to Hill Auditorium. Noted
in maritime circles, Villiers is also
the author of two best-sellers.
Fifth member of the series
will be Charles Laughton, who
will give his program entitled
'An Evening with Charles
Laughton." The distinguished ac-
Students Chosen
For Scholarships
NEW YORK-(IP)-Two hundred
outstanding students, most of
them not out of high school, have
been chosen for a program that
will give them two years of free
college before they reach draft age.
The names of the students, who
come from 32 states, will be an-
nounced after each has formally
accepted the scholarships offered
for this fall by the Universities of
Chicago, Columbia, Wisconsin and
Yale.
Besides tuition, most students
will receive up to $1,000 cash for
living expenses.
Financed by a $1,200,000 grant
from the Ford Foundation, the
program is limited to boys under
16% years old and is intended to
make sure some students get
through half their college educa-
tion before being drafted.

4+:. '
s,,:,. :, ; p'
fa: ' r .
{ ,
} .:
t $ (\
":
r
..
} ' T:
Ot
{:? ~
?: , i
j..
..,., ".
y f " : :_:,
.4{ ' i ^{. '.':
}ty { .i .;i ; iii.
} ..
.- y .. ; ;.
X
:: y;
t .
{=
.;ti
4 +<'
t
_ Q$
{
,
4
^ .

. -fry , "..
°; a
.
1 .T
,,.
' jj
4 ,(, 4
k; ..i'-
+ili
=:

SPARKLING SUMMER
J EWELRY
$129
reg. $2-$3-$4.
plus tax
" NECKLACES * BRACELETS
" EARRINGS . . White seed
beads, poka dot beads, white
porcelain novelties; porcelain
and rhinestone combinations.

302 South State

VICE-PRESIDENT BARKLEY
* * *,
tor is returning Feb. 19 by popu-
lar request.
Roscoe Drummond, Director of
Information ° for the Marshall
Plan,, will speak on "The State of
the World" March 11.
Winding up the series, John
Mason Brown, leading dramatic

SEN. KEFAUVER
critic and associate editor of the
Saturday Review of Literature,
will make his sixth annual appear-
ance March 26. He will comment
on current literature and the
Broadway theatre.
Mail orders addressed to the Or-
atorical Association, 3211 Angell
.;all, are now being accepted.

Earrings, $1 and 1.29

ArIN

.
t,
w

REPEAT

x

SALE

r

I

h

Sheerest, Barest
NO SEAM
NYLONS

x

-.

I

I

4.

3 pr. for 2.59

Top quality filmy sheers, flatter-
ing and lovely from toe to top.
Perfect to wear with summer '
sandals. 15 denier 400 needle
nn1 inA l-t~Iin ~ci iynVrt+,1Y-nwrn \vr nA" ....

Suits

A.

t

STUDE~m
CTTl~vyT I

VT
W. Q

$18

11

a

I

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan