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July 11, 1951 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1951-07-11

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 1951

TWO WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 1951

Survey Shows Michigan
Industries Leaving State

By EVA SIMON
Michigan must work harder to
win business and influence manu-
facturers if it is to prevent a grad-
ual trickle of industry to other
states.
This was the finding of a sam-
ple survey of Michigan manufac-
turers made #by the University
Survey Research Center and pub-
lished in a 77-page pamphlet, "In-
dustrial Mobility in, Michigan."
OF THE industrialists inter-
viewed last year, 12 said they have
been considering moving all or,
part of their plants to another
state. A dozen more were consider-
ing expansion of their plants out-
side Michigan.
The survey predicts that the
out - movement will, "according
to available indications," be
compensated by movement of
plants to Michigan and by the
creation of new industry in the
State.
But it adds the disquieting in-
formation that "one major cause
for not planning to move a plant
out of the State is a general state
of inertia rather than advantages
of plant location in Michigan ov-
er alternative locations."
DISADVANTAGES most often
mentioned by plant managers in-
clude:
1. High labor costs relative to
output per man hour.
2. Difficulties with organized
labor.
3. High local taxes.
4. The need to be closer to ma-
terials (largely steel), or to mar-
kets.
5. Traffic congestion and lack
of space for expansion in Detroit.
Decisions by manufacturers
Monday thru Friday
44c to 630 P.M.

to move out of Michigan 'might
not only impede the growth of
Michigan industry, but also in-
volve the possibility that Michi-
gan plants may be shut down
after the plants outside Michi-
gan have proven themselves, or
in the event that general eco-
nomic conditions deteriorate,"
the report warned.
The picture is not all black,
however. Many manufacturers in-
terviewed mentioned distinct ad-
vantages which are keeping them
inside the state.
PRODUCERS OUTSIDE of De-
troit often pointed out that the
high productivity fo workers
makes up for higher wages.
Not the least of the attrac-
tions noted was that Michigan
is a "nice place to live."
The nearness to markets, par-
ticularly automotive plants; and
no materials, especially semi-f ab-
ricated parts, are also stemming
the flow of industry to other
states.
* * S
THE SURVEY was made under
the direction of Rensis Likert of
the University Institute of Social
Research, of which the Survey
Research Center is a part.
"We want the report to have
wide circulation a n d careful
study," Cisler declared. "Then we
must have an organized effort to
correct those situations which
stand in the way of Michigan's
growth and to take advantage of
the things that are good."
014ldVersus
New Teaching
Cited in Talk
Prof. James B. Edmonson, dean
of the School of Education,.spoke
Monday on "The Old Versus the
New in American Education."
In his talk, part of the Summer
Education Lecture Series now be-
ing held at the University, Dean
Edmonson called attention to the
great increase in present enroll-
ment over that of 1920. "Today's
enrollment," he said, "is 80 per
cent higher than that of 30 per
cent in 1920."
Dean Edmonson also said the
radical changes in the high school
have resulted in introduction of
new courses, new methods and new
services.
He added, "classroom teaching
has become more difficult than
formerly because of increased
classes and the wide range of in-
terests and abilities of the present
generation of high school stu-
dents."

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
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Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST WALLET - Will party finding
man's wallet in Harris Hall July 2
please mail the remains to Alexander
Smith, 1106 Packard. No questions
asked. The papers are vital. )101L
PARKER 51 PEN-Black and silver, gold
clip on Madison, State Angell Hall.
Reward. Ralph L. Christensen 2-9234.
)100L

ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower, Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )1R
GIRLS ROOMING HOUSE
Large studio type room, Two closets.
Two beds. Community kitchen. Be-
tween campus & hospitals. Ph. 2-2826.
) 81R
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY-German 11 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann, 2-7909. )14M
ROOM AND BOARD
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meals for men. Excellent food and

ROOM AND BOARD
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work. Phone 3-4040. )35H
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
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READ DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

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FOR SALE

-Daily-Robert Lewis
CONSCIENCE-STRICKEN-Alexan (left), played by Bill Taylor, Grad., appears remorseful as he
and Mrs. Stockman, Bernice Daniels, Grad., listen to Dennir Morley tell of the beating he received
at school. Dr. Stockman, (right) played by Nafe Katter, Grad., has been labeled "An Enemy of the
People" through the efforts of Alexan in the Spe ech Dept. play to be presented at 8 p.m. today.

MEN'S RAYON DRESS TROUSERS 3.88.
Free cuff alterations; assorted colors.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )151
WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS-Matched set
4 irons, 1 wood. Brand new, never been
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SUMMER .STORE HOURS - 12:30 till 5:00
SME Closed Saturdays
"Home of the official Michigan Rings."
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FOR RENT

'Enemy of the Peonle'
Will Be Given Tonight

Organ Recital
In Hill Today

MARRIED COUPLE-Room with break-
fast and lunch, kitchen privileges, $6
a week. 509 Walnut. Call 3-0807. )39F

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Continuous
Daily from
1 P.M.
Doors Open
12:45 P.M.

LAST DAY

- STARTS THURSDAY --

If f-vv.

I

- Today and Tomorrow -
"Edge of Doom"
Dana Andrews
Farley Granger
- and-
"Kill the Umpire"
with WILLIAM BENDIX

Adapted by Arthur Miller, '38,
"An Enemy of the People" will
open at .8 p.m. today in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre as the sec-
ond play of the speech depart-
ment's Summer Season of Plays.
Presented for the first time on
campus, Miller's adaptation of
Henrik Ibsen's drama tells of the
discovery by Dr. Stockmann of the
unsanitary conditions of the
"health" baths in the small Nor-
Vice-Admiral
Links NATO,
U.S. Security
Future security of the United
States is dependent upon the suc-
cess of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization, according to Vice-
Adm. Jerauld Wright of the U. S.
Navy.
The deputy U. S. representative
to the NATO Standing Group
spoke as part of the Summer Ses-
sion lecture series on "The United
States in the World Crisis."
WRIGHT TRACED the evolu-
tion of the United States' first de-
fense pact from Washington's "no
entangling alliances." The North
Atlantic Treaty, which he called
"perhaps the most binding alliance
of modern times," was an out-
growth of the new appreciation
that collective security means col-
lective support, he said.
"NATO serves the first prin-
ciple of the United Nations as a
subsidiary instrument of the
UN to help maintain the peace,"
he asserted. "The first clause
of the Treaty's preamble calls
for faith in the UN."
Furthermore, he said, all at-
tacks on NATO nations are to be
reported to the Security Council.
He added that if the UN organ
takes adequate measures to end
the breach of peace, the immedi-
ate NATO miiltary action would
be called off.
EDUCATORS
and
LIBRARIANS
You are cordially
invited to visit our
STORY LAND
TOY TOWN
Complete
Children's Department
featuring the finest
BOOKS, GAMES,
GIFTS, TOYS
FOLLETT'S
2nd Floor
State & North University

wegian town in which he lives.
It is from these "baths" that the
town derives its livelihood.
* * *
MISTAKENLY believing that he
has done the town a great service,
Dr. Stockmann, played by Nafe
Katter, is positive that immediate
measures will be taken to improve
the situation.
But the selfish interests of
his brother, who is mayor of
the town, and Hovstad, who is
editor of the newspaper, inter-
fere. Played by Richard Burg-
win and Bruce Nary, respective-
ly, the mayor and editor incite
the townsmen against Dr.
Stockmann.
He attempts to defend himself
and his position of truth by hold-
ing a public meeting in a private
home, the only place Hovstad and
the mayor do not control.
THE MOB attacks the home,
Dr. Stockmann, his wife, as play-
ed by Bernice Daniel, and his
children, played by Dennis Mor-
ley and Michael Philbin.
Branded as an enemy of the
people, Dr. Stockmann martyrs
himself and his family. Telling
them that because they stand
for truth they must reconcile
themselves to be forever lonely,
he cancels their planned jour--
ney to America,
Others in the cast include Wil-
liam Taylor, Gloria Morre, Wil-
lard Booth, Stan Challis and
James Briley. All of the cast, with
the exception of the children who
are played by two Ann Arbor
grammar school students, are gra-
duate students in the speech de-
partment.
MILLER HAS adapted what cri-
tics have termed as the "some-
what stilted language of the liter-
al Ibsen translations" into a fluid
colloquial A m e r i c a n dialogue,
without hanging Ibsen's point of
view.
The play will be directed by
Prof. H. Z. Norton. Sets for the
play have been designed by
George Crepeau and the cos-
tumes were designed and exe-
cuted by Lucy Barton.
Tickets for the performances,
which will be given today through
Saturday nights, may be purchas-
ed from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily,
and on performance night until 8
p.m. at the Lydia Mendelssohn
box office.
Funeral Services
DETROIT - (P)-Funeral serv-
ices will be held tomorrow in sub-
urban Birmingham for Ronald J.
Waterbury, 52 years old, Assistant
Chief Engineer for the Chevrolet
Division of General Motors Corp.
0 MEALS 50c up(
Breakfast.. .7:00-10:00U
Lunch. . . ...I1:00-1 :30
Dinner ......5:00-7:00c
MEAL MART
CAFETERIA
338 Maynard, Thru the Arcade
->'->< A-0<>

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AwithPESO.NFOTER A PCKTU E

-- --

...M.MMUMMMINIF

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Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

d

University Musical Society
CONCERTS
Seventy-third Annual Choral Union Series
VICTORIA DE LOS ANGELES, Soprano . . . . Thursday, Oct. 4
JOSEF SZIGETTI, Violinist . Monday, Oct. 15
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTR\
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor . . . . . Sunday, Oct. 21
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor . . . . . . Sunday, Nov. 4
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY, Pianist*** . Friday, Nov. 16
SALVATORE BACCALONI, Bass . . hursday, Nov. 20
CINCINNATI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor.** .. Monday, an. 14
SINGING BOYS OF NORWAY r. . . . Wednesday, Feb. 20
SHAW CHORALE AND ORCHESTRA . . . . Tuesday, Mar. 18
ADOLF BUSCH, Violinist, and
RUDOLFSERKIN, Pianist . ..... Monday, Mar. 31
Season Tickets (tax incl.) : Unclaimed seats in Block A, $16.80;
Block B, $14.40; Block C, $12.00.
Sixth Annual Extra Concert Series
GLADYS SWARTHOUT, Mezzo-Soprano . rT * euesday, Oct. 9
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor , Monday, Oct. 22
dePAUR'S INFANTRY CHORUS . . . . . . Tuesday, Nov. 20
OSCAR LEVANT, Pianist....,FrdyJa.1
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,
RAFAEL KUBELIK, Conductor. .... Sunday, Mar. 9
Season Tickets (tax incl.): Block A, $8.40; Block B $7.20;
Block C, $6.00
Annual Christmas Concerts
"MESSIAH" (Handel) . . . . . . . Dec. 8 and 9
Nancy Carr, Soprano Oscar Natzka, Bass

L

It's Here!
OPENING TONIGHT

The Department of Speech
presents
"AN ENEMY OF
THE PEOPLE"
by HENRIK IBSEN
Adapted by Arthur Miller

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QUALITY FOOD

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dXWII 9.1311 ~L.-, ®i TLJF a Tf'. COLLYER

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