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July 04, 1951 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1951

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

:.

CUPID THWARTED:
Curtis Forced To Delay
Honeymoon for Tour

ELRUIEfl

How would you like to go on
your honeymoon without your
wife?
That is the situation in which
Anthony Curtis has found him-
self.
* * *
CURTIS, a young motion pic-
ture actor recently elevated to
stardom, explained the details
while in Ann Arbor Sunday to pro-
mote his latest epic "The Prince
Who Was A Thief."
The New York-born actor la-
mented the fact that he won't
see his wife, MGM's curvaceous
Janet Leigh, for another 13 days.
They were married three weeks
* * *

ago in New England and on the
next day Curtis began a five
weeks personal appearance tour.
"What's even worse," said Cur-
tis, "is the fact that our tour is
covering practically the same itin-
erary we had planned for our
honeymoon."
Accompanying him on his visit
here was his co-star in "The
Prince Who Was A Thief," former
Detroiter Piper Laurie. Nineteen
year old Miss Laurie, who exhibits
a pleasing personality besides her
more obvious charms, spent most
of her afternoon in a State St.
movie theatre handing out auto-
graphed photos that showed her
reclining in a tree.
SPOTTED AMONG the long
lines of grade and high school stu-
dents waiting to receive Miss Lau-
rie's photograph were several Uni-
versity students.
When asked what he planned
to do with the likeness, Bill Oles,
'54,, said "The tree in the photo
is extremely rare and should un-
doubtedly help me in my botany
course."
An interview with the two young
stars by local disc- ockey Ted
Johnson brought out the fact that
both enjoy their Hollywood ca-
reers, despite the early hours,
bruises received on the set, and
such unforeseen emergencies as
Curtis' postponed honeymoon.
The two stars, shepherded by
veteran Universal Studio publicity
man Frank McFadden, left for
their next stop, Monroe, after Cur-
tis had attended to a very import-
ant detail.
He bought several china figur-
ines for his wife in a local store.
"Sort of a pre-honeymoon gift,"
he said, obviously thinking of how
to soothe his wife for the missed
honeymoon.
New Fire Station
Appears Certain
It looks as if Ann Arbor wil at
last get the much talked of and
long awaited second fire station
in view of the action taken last
night by the City Council.
The councilmen approved the
Fire Commission's recommenda-
tion to buy four lots on the south
side of E. Stadium Blvd, near
Packard as the proposed site for
the new station, despite a protest
petition.
Eighty - four property owners
signed a petition protesting the
proposed location. Francis W.
Shilling, attorney for th petition-
ers, requested a "full-dress hear-
ing," charging that the Fire Com-
mission was "lacking in finesse in
not obtaining the views of the
residents of the area" before tak-
ing the option to buy the lots.
Counsel Workshop
Set for Six Weeks
The 1951 Guidance Workshop,
under the direction of S. C. Huls-
lander, counselor trainer, and Del-
mont H. Byrn, assistant director,
will be in operation for the six
week period ending August 4.
The workshop day is divided in-
to a lecture period followed by dis-
cussion, the showing of films re-
lated to guidance problems, and
individual and committee work.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Rose gold ladies Bulova wrist
watch. Back engraved with Frank to
Joyce. Call 3-1511, Ext. 526. )99L
FOR SALE
GOLF CLUBS--Matched set Joe Kirk-
wood clubs, 4 irons, 2 woods. Never
been used. $30.95. Ph. 2-8692. )149
BE PROFICIENT IN GERMAN. Set of
15 discs for $20.50. Cost $55.00. Phone
2-3028. )148
1947 HARLEY-DAVIDSON 45 cu. in. mo-
torcycle.Excellent condition. See it
at Howell's on South U. Call John
Lauer, Univ. Ext. 2198. )146
WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS - 4 matched
irons, 1 wood. Brand new. Never been
used. $24.95. Ph. 2-8692. )145
FOR RENT
MODERN APARTMENT on Half Moon
Lake. Boat and utilities furnished.
July through September. Chelsea 7607.
)38F
APARTMENT-Complete kitchen, utili-
ties provided. Men preferred, near
campus. Call between 5-7 p.m., 6336.
906 Greenwood. )37F
ROOMS FOR RENT
GIRLS ROOMING HOUSE
Large studio type room. Two closets,
Two beds. Community kitchen. Be-
tween campus & hospitals. Ph. 2-2826.
)81R

ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath. Shower, Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )1R
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. )80R
WASHTENAW AREA - Pleasant single
room with private lavatory and toilet.
Gentlemen preferred. 2-3868. )77R
ROOM AND BOARD
FOOD FOOD FOOD - Home cooked
meals for men. Excellent food and
coffee. 1319 Hill. )4X
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE -
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hill and Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. )3X

TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING '49 CHEVROLET 4-door sedan
to Los Angeles July 6. Want passen-
gers. Gene Jeacobson University Es
tension 2612, Home 2-0664. )37T
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Capable reader to read for
blind student. Between 9 a.m.-12 noon.
85c per hr. Call 2-2217. )57H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING WANTED to do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590, 830 S. Main.
) 32B
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
does not advertise its special student-
educator rates on Sunday because3it
is closed. )31B
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
cialize in doing summer dresses.
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY-German 11 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translatiop.
A. R. Neumann, 2-7909. )14M
Read Daily Classifieds

I
'4

4

44

i

PERSONAL

I

STUDENT would like tutor for Physics
course. Bonus if student passes course.
Call Isadore, 2-1937. )58P
WANTED - Information regarding the
whereabouts of the Byrle Abbin Cup.
Two Desperate Coeds. Write Box 38,
Michigan Daily. )57P

x

-Daily-James Butt
RIGHT AS RAIN-Aunt Eller, played by Norma Stolzenbach, Grad. (center) is in the midst of prov-
ing to Mr. Peck, Wm. Taylor, Grad., that as usual women are always right. Laurie, Curly and Ado
Annie, played by Delores Rashid, Grad., Jim Bob Stephenson, Grad., and Donna Benson, '52, look on
with mixed reactions to this scene from "Green Grow the Lilacs" which will open at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre tonight.
GREEN GROW THE LILACS:
Pioneer Drama Will Premiere Today

ANN ARBOR VISITOR-Piper
Laurie, 19, new Hollywood star,
wore considerably more than
this when she visited Ann Arbor
Sunday.
To Head Confab
T. Hawley Tapping, general sec-
retary of the Alumni Association
and president of the American
Alumni Council, will preside over
the thirty-sixth annual national
conference of the A.A.C. July
9-12.
Continuous
Daily from
" ' 1 P.M.
ALL DAY
5c JULY 4ths

By HARRIET TEPPERMAN LYNN RIGG'S play is well-
In keeping with the pioneer known for its simple, authentic
spirit of Independence Day, the representation of the people who
speech department will present lived on the prairies in the days
t h e opening performance of before 1900-before civilization
"Green Grow the Lilacs," a play invaded the West along with
rich in American frontier humor, statehood.
tonight at Lydia Mendelssohn The play tells of Laurie, played
Theatre. by Delores Rashid, Grad., who is
Because Prof. Claribel Baird, courted by rugged Curly McClain
the director, felt there had been a and mysterious Jeeter Fry, roles
revival of interest in cowboy bal- played by Jim Bob Stepheson,
lads and square dances on cam- Grad., and Ted Heusel, Grad.
pus, she chose "Green Grow the Forthright Aunt Eller, played
Lilacs" as the first play of the by Norma Stolzenbach, settles all
season. the complications that arise, in
Professor Claims Educators
Will Win Share of TV Space

-Lost
Edwmmmw

Day Today-

Educators, currently fighting
for their share of television chan-
nels, will emerge victorious by the
end of the year, according to Ed-
ward Stasheff, a visiting professor
of speech.
"The Federal Communications
Commission has tentatively allot-
ed ten per cent of the potential
All A's Received
By 25 Engineers
Twenty-five students of the en-
gineering college received all A's
in the spring semester of 1951, it
was announced today.
They are: James W. Brummer,
'31, George R. Curry, '54, Robert
E. Frese, '51, Edward O. Gilbert,
'52, Elmer G. Gilbert, Donald H.
Groelsema, '51, Dale D. Haskin,
'52, Kenneth C. Hendershot, '52,
Barry Henning, '53, John C. Hen-
sel, '52, Jack R. Jennings, '52.
The list continues with Loren
B. Johnston, Jr., '52, Thomas E.
Kriewall, '53, Lawrence R. Mack,
'52, James R. Mellor, '52, Robert
H. Miller, '52, Ralph C. Peterson,
'51, Stanley B. Reynolds, Jr.
Others are Robert L. Reensch,
'52, Dean R. Smith, '51, Bruce W.
Swanson, '53, Donald E. Tackett,
'53, Frederick M. Waltz, '54, Ron-
ald E. West, '54, Franklin H. Wes-
tervelt, '52.

channels for non-commercial use,"
he said, "and the final decision is
being held until the report of the
Joint Committee on Educational
Television has been made."
Ss * " *
STASHEFF, WHO is television
supervisor for the New York City
Board of Education, is teaching a
TV research program for graduate
students here during the summer
session.
Stasheff emphasized that TV
researchers are getting in on
the bottom floor by starting
their collection of data while the
industry is still young.

Because it is difficult to find+
records after an industry has
its start television records are1
ing kept from the beginning.

old
got
be-

spite of the intervention of Donna
Benson, '52, who plays the comic,
awkward Ado Annie.
The unadorned plot is decor-
ated with a cowboy atmosphere
of songs, square dances-known
as "play parties" in the play-
an harmonica and an old-fash-
ioned reed-organ.
There is a great deal of history
behind the folk songs and dances.
One story tells of the origin of the
Mexican word "gringos," which
they applied to the white men to
the north.
It seems that "Green Grow the
Lilacs," title song of the play, was
a favorite among the cowboys who
rode the range. The Mexicans
colloquiallized the first two words
into the appellation "gringos."
Square dances, then known as
"play parties," were invented
about this time by the young peo-
ple due to necessity. Parents of the
era completely disapproved of
dancing, calling it useless occupa-
tion, "inspired by the devil."
Prompted by the need for some
type of recreation, the young men
and women invented the "play
>arty," as they called it in order
to fool their parents.
* * *
"GREEN GROW THE LILACS"
was produced by the Theatre
Guild in New York during the
early 1930's, and was such a suc-
cess in its own right, that Richard
Rodgers and. Oscar Hammerstein
adapted it as the basis for their
smash-hit musical "Oklahoma!"
Directed by Prof. Baird, the cos-
tumes have been designed by Lucy
Barton, guest costumiere for the
summer who is on leave from the
University of Texas. The Art De-
signer is George Crepeau.
Season and single tickets for
summer plays can be purchased
from 4-8 p.m. today, and from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. every other day ex-
cept Sunday at the Lydia Men-
delssohn box office.
Council Boosts
U' Romancej
Coeds on Observatory Hill may
soon be meeting what might turn
out to be interesting strangers
through the legitimate pretext of
"two nickels for a dime," on Sun-
days as well as week days, thanks
to the City Council.
This boost to social relations
comes from a vote made by the
Council Monday, which will place
the planned 100 meters in the
University Hospital area in service
seven days a week instead of the
usual six days, as an accommoda-
tion to out-of-town visitors.
* * *
A LONE dissenting vote was
cast by City Alderman John B.
Melott who declared that the city
is getting "nickel hungry" if it
asks out-of-town visitors to pay
for parking there on Sundays.
The meters will extend from the
second entrance of Mosher-Jordan
past Alice Lloyd Hall to Ann Street
on the west side and on the east
from Washington Heights to Ann
Street.

*'~-I4
200etasla

I

FRESHES °.

-I

COOLS
and RE

I

Serving Quality Food
at Popular Prices
OPEN 11 A.M. to 8 P M
Daily (Except Monday)
HARMONY Restaurant
Liberty at Fourth Avenue

. o

-L

I

t

Against your skin a chill
delicious touch of snow
...a gliding fragrant
coolness. This glitteringly'
beautiful icicle for hot
days. Goes where
you go... travels nicely
and icily.

I

E

The dff# Restaurant
GOOD FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Open Daily - 7 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.
CLOSED SUNDAYS
We sell for less!
338 SOUTH STATE STREET

Opens Tonight!
"GREEN GROW
THE LILACS"
a comic folk-play with music
by LYNN RIGGS

A

r.

- Starts Thursday --
BRIAN DONLEVY
ELLA RAINES
"FIGHTING
COAST GUAR D"

Holiday Price 65c

---- a

I

9

MEALS 50e up
Breakfast...7:00-10:00V
Lunch. :. .,.11 :00-1 :30
Dinner .. . .. 5:00-7:00
MEAL MART
CAFETERIA
338 Maynard, Thru the Arcade
(-->O<><><><> o

Read and Use
DAILY
CLASS IFlIEDS

"We plan to do research work
on such topics as the type of pro-
grams that appeal to the new TV
owner and programs he prefers a
year after he has had the set,"
Stasheff declared, "and scattered
studies already made show that
after the novelty wears off, the
type of program must be improved
to hold the audience."
Stasheff has been a free lance
director for the American Broad-
casting Company, a part-time
teacher at the Teachers College at
Columbia University and assistant
program manager for two years at
TV station WPIX.
Job Registration
Students, staff and faculty
members are reminded that sum-
mer registration for those inter-
ested in obtaining employment
through the Bureau of Appoint-
ments will open with a meeting at
3 p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 4051 Ad-
ministration Building.
Frozen Custard
ICE CREAM
Pts. & Qts. to take home.
LIBERTY
CUSTARD SHOP
100 ft. from Theaters

1,

Jhe Si? GC, inema i/
BEGINS ITS SUMMER SERIES WITH
RIE1MIBRANIDTF
j [trringj
MR. CHARLES LAUGHTON
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM 50c (tax included)
Friday and Saturday at 7:30 and 9:30
I

Calkins-Fletcher
DRUG CO.
324 South State Street
818 South State Street
WE DELIVER

Wednesday
through Saturday
8 P.M.

Box Office Open July 4 - 4:00-8:00
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

(

; - i

Tickets
$1.20
90c - 60c

NEW HOURS AT

7'te Cottage fih
7:00 A.M.-2:00 P.M.
CLOSED 2:00 P.M.-5:00 P.M.
DINNER 5:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M.

F

3'

A

V -T -I

L. G. BALFOUR CO.
rD fArFfnflKIITh r r i n/CI\D

REMINDER TO
VETERANS

1
;

TYPEWRITERS
Adding Machines
Webster-Chicago
Wire Recorders
Rented, Sold, Repaired
Repair work a specialty.

Stationery
Greeting Cards
Loose Leaf Note Books
Typewriter, Supplies
Note Books and Paper

.4.

STUDENT SUPPLIES
Fountain Pens

* GI Bill ends July 25

h

1 . . f ; . ,:

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