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August 22, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-08-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22,- 1951

PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 1951 PAGE THREE

WALKING

ENCYCLOPEDIA:

'Miss Mac', Busy Social Director of League.
Acts As Man Friday for Women's Activities

* * * *

"Ask Miss Mac - she knows."
This phrase or its equivalent is
echoed over and over again at
the League, where the "walking
book" of knowledge and guidance
on women's activities hangs her
hat.
OFFICIALLY known as Miss
Ethel A. McCormick, social direc-
tor of the League, she is affec-
tionately called "our Miss Mac"
by coeds from all corners of the
campus.
Her title of social director does
not begin to describe the innum-
erable things, great and small,
she does to help Michigan wo-
men.
The endless duties of the "main-
stay of the League" include see-
ing that every job or project un-
dertaken by coeds in connection
with the League is a success.
* * * .
MISS McCORMICK is the con-
sultant on every type of event
ranging from JGI and Soph Cab
to men's dancing classes.
She is also responsible for bud-
geting events, with a primary in-
terest in developing leaders and
women who can assume respon-
sibility, rather than in making
profits.
No matter is too insignificant
to merit Miss McCormick's full
attention, and coeds often marvel
at her amazing capacity to "find
time for everything."
* * *
MANY TIMES she has allowed
women to undertake projects that
she believed would not be entire-
ly successful. She was quick to
admit, however, that in some cases
she was wrong.
Commenting on the' League
Council's merit system of peti-
tioning and interviewing, Miss
McCormick said that she feels

MISS ETHEL A. McCORMICK
* * * ** *

a sincere effort is made to help
every woman feel she is welcome
in any campus activity.
"League - trained women are
best-trained," Miss McCormick de-
clared.
* * *
THE EXPERIENCE gained in
formulating ideas and bearing the
responsibility of carrying them
out often proves valuable in mak-
ing decisions and plans in future
years, she added.
As a member of the women's
physical education department,
Miss McCormick first came in
contact wtih Michigan coeds.

At that time the cast of the
Junior Girl's Play rehearsed in
Barbour Gymnasium and Miss
McCormick began her years of
service to University coeds by an-
swering questions which arose in
connection with the production.
When the League was complet-
ed in 1929, President Ruthven ask-
ed her to serve as coordinating
supervisor of women's activities,
a position she has held since that
time.
Miss McCormick is indeed an
indispensable part of the League
and a truly wonderful person to
know.

Ann Arbor Set
ReceivesAid
From Its Club
Women Not Living
On Campus Organize
For Representation
First semester social activities
of women residing in private Ann
Arbor homes usually are centered
about the Ann Arbor Girls' Club.
The club takes the place=of dorm
life and is run in the same manner
as many other campus organiza-
tions except that one member at-
tends a weekly meeting with re-
presentatives of the League houses.
* * *
THIS DELEGATE is responsible
for informing the rest of the club
of current campus activites. Since
notices are generally posted in the
dorms, this is the only way the
Ann Arbor girls may be informed
of campus events.
Ann Arbor women in the 1950-
51 club participated in many
campus activities, sponsored some
of their own and worked on sug-
gestions for improvement of next
year's club.
First to receive the attention of
the Ann Arbor Girls' Club was the
annual Fortnight, sponsored by
the Assembly Association. The
women gave a satire on fraternity
life, comparing it with what it
might have been in the days of
flourishing Greek cultures had
there been fraternities then.
* * *
THEY SECURED a third place
tie out of 14 entries, but decided
their club needed more publicity
when they heard a coed behind
them whisper as they went up to
receive their award, "What is this
Ann Arbor Girls' Club anyway, a
business girls' organization?"
During the year, the club also
held an open house after one
of the football games, a tea for
Ann Arbor women attending
other colleges, and entered both
basketball and volleyball teams
in the WAA tournaments.
"All play and no work" isn't the
club's motto, however, for the
members worked on the Student
Legislature election, tying tags and
taking charge -of election booths.
Formerly the Ann Arbor Girls'
Club functioned only for first se-
mester freshmen since so manyof
the members pledged soroities dur-
ing the first rushing period. So
much interest was shown in con-
tinuing the club both semesters
and allowing sophomers, juniors
and seniors to remain active mem-
bers, however, that the club has
now been opened to any Ann Ar-
bor area coed regardless of her
class or sorority affiliation.

Annual Class Projects Renew Rivalries
(4 .* s s, s

Soph Cab, Sr. Night,
JGP, Frosh Weekend
Are Traditional Even
Although the women on campus
are united for many activities,
class rivalries still exist during
much of the year.
While the freshmen are con-
cerned primarily with their "Frosh
Weekend," the sophomores, jun-
iors and seniors are also busy
planning their special projects,
Rivalry has always been part of
the tradition between the junior
and senior class women. It has
been highlighted since 1904 by the
annual junior class presentation
of an original play.
SINCE THE FIRST performance
47 years ago, it has become a tra-
ditional event presented for only
the senior class on its opening per-
formance.
The Junior Girls' Play is us-
ually centered about a musical
theme which is kept secret un-
til it is first presented to the
audience of senior women.
The 1951 JGP production was
entitled "It's the Payoff," which
was written and produced entire-
ly by members of the junior class.
The story revolved about the trials
and tribulations of three girls who
journeyed to New York to work on
the stage. While living in a board-
ing house run by a thick-brogued
Irish landlady, the girls plan to
produce a musical in a deserted
barn, complete'with ghosts.
* * *
THE SENIORS, who view the
production, are free to applaud
and demand any part of the sing-
ing, dancing or lines to be repeat-
ed during this opening perform-
ance.
Dressed in their caps and
gowns for the first time, the sen-
iors attend the play after their
traditional senior dinner in the

Posts Gained
y Petitioning
Committees Choose
New Of Fice Holders
A question that many future
3 oeds of the University often ask
about is just how they can find.
their way into some of the many
activities on campus.
Most of the major women's posi-
tions such as chairmen of dances,
League, WAA, Panhellenic and As-
sembly posts are filled by a system
known as interviewing and nomi-
nating.
* * *
IF A COED DECIDES she would
like to apply for a job in a campus
activity, she first fills out a peti-
tion.
On these petitions there are
questions to be filled out regard-
ing past activities, grade point
average and references. To this
plank the candidate attaches
extra sheets on which she out-
lines what she believes to be the
duties of the office and her own
plans for the position.
She then is interviewed by a
panel of coeds who give her an op-
portunity to elaborate on her ideas
in greater detail. The interview-
ing committee then evaluates the
girl on the basis of her ideas and
past record.
A COMPLETE RECORD is kept
of each coed's activities during her
stay at the University. These re-
cords are used as reference by
employers and honor societies.
It is the duty of the activities
chairman in the dormitories to
keep the coeds in her house In-
formed as to when petitions are
due at the League.
All the positions for the comiig
year are announced at Installation
Night. At this time coeds. gather
together in Hill Auditorium to
hear the announcements and to
congratulate their friends.

SENIOR NIGHT-Dressed in their caps and gowns, two senior
coeds are shown participating in the traditional Senior Night
festivities at the League. The women walk across the stage of
the Lydia Mendelssohn theatrr and reveal their standing in the
"matrimonial race" by carrying candles if they are married, suck-
ing lemons if engaged, wearing straight pins if pinned and toss-
ing pennies into a wishing well if they are unattached. The event
takes place preceding the opening performance of JGP which
the seniors attend in a body,

* * *
League. It is the last time that
they are together for any Lea-
gue sponsored event.
During dinner, the women also
perform the customary walk across
the League Ballroom stage where
they reveal their standing in the
"matrimonial race" by the articles
that they have with them.

Judiciary Council Enforces
'U' Rules Governing Coeds

It is the job of the Women's Ju-
diciary Council to enforce the
rules governing women students at
the University.
The Council consists of three
senior women, four juniors and six
sophomore aides. These members
are chosen to represent the inter-
ests of the women students and to
formulate standards of conduct.
The seven student members
work with the Dean of Women, to
enforce rules and to act in cases
of infractions of those rules.
s* s
WORK OF the chairman is to
direct and coordinate the duties of
the Council while the secretary
has charge of the files and cor-
respondence and directs the work
of the sophomore aides.
Each year the Council pub-
lishes the House Rules and Or-
ganization pamphlet. As creator
of these rules it is the duty of
each coed to be acquainted with
them. The rules are maintained
through close cooperation with
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

the Resident Director and Judi-
ciary Council.
Counseling hours are held in the
Undergraduate Office of the Mich-
igan League every Tuesday from
3 to 5 p.m., and Council members
urge anyone with problems or
suggestions to come and discuss
them at this time.
* * *
EVERY THURSDAY from 3 to
5 p.m. the members meet in the
same room to formulate policies
and to consider cases brought be-
fore them. Each member of the
Judiciary Council is assigned a
certain number of houses with
whose Resident Directors and
House Presidents she works closely
throughout the year.
If the need for a rule change
arises, a sub-committee of the
Board of Representatives works
jointly with the Women's Judiciary
Council to investigate the proposal.
Their report is later dsicussed by
the Board, and a motion for the
new rules is framed. This is taken
back to each dormitory, league
house, sorority house, and coopera-
tive house to be voted upon by all
women residents. A three-fourths
majority in each house is required
to put the rule into effect.

Assembly..
(Continued from Page 1).
floor of the League as a "Show
Boat" for the semi-formal event.
* * *
THE DANCE is held near the
beginning of the spring semester,
while interviewing and petitioning
for chairmanships begins in the
fall for those interested in work-
ing on it.
Another- special project 'spon-
sored by Assembly is the Dispiac-
ed Person's fund. Through the
proceeds and profits from stores
maintained in the various dorms
on campus, a foreign student is
helped to attend the university.
For other activities Assembly
works with several campus groups.
For the Student Faculty teas, Tag-
day and Frosh Weekend, they
combine forces with Panhel.

CAMPUS CLOTHESLINE:
Fashion Show To Be Given

* * 4.
MARRIED WOMEN carry can-
dies while those who are engaged
suck lemons. Pinned women wear
ctraight pins while those who .are
unattached throw a penny for each
year of their age into a wishing
well as they cross the stage.
In the fall semester, the sopho-
more women present their an-
nual Soph Cabaret. A carnival at-
mosphere complete with special
boothes, refreshments and card
games invades the entire second
floor of the League while the ball-
room is used for dancing.
Another feature of the two-night
event is the presentation of a
floor show in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn theatre where the sophomore
women sing and dance to enter-
tain those who attend the gala
festivities.
* * *
THE VARIOUS CLASS projects
are designed to enable the women
o i campus to work together to-
ward a common goal.

In order to help the entering
freshmen women with their clothes
problem, the Women's Athletic As-
sociation will present a style show
on Monday, Sept. 17, at Rackham
Amphitheatre.
The WAA Executive Board and
club managers will be introduced
at this time, and will serve as
models for the clothing which has
been furnished by a local store.

Freshmen women attending the
show will have an opportunity to
become acquainted with the board
members and the managers and
to talk with them concerning sport
activities.
Appropriate sport wear, as well
as typical clothing worn by Michi-
gan coeds for all types of events,
will be modeled.

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