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August 03, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 3,1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

White,

.900-1*4L&

.
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7

Shutut

)/U Ikees,

6-0

Barnum Has
Sizzling 64
In Tan Golf
Grand Rapids Pro
Gets Back Nine 29
CHICAGO---(P)-Little-regarded
John Barnum, hulking 220-pound
pro of Grand Rapids, Mich., who
never has broken into big time
tournazent money, shot an eight-
under-par 64 with a record crack-
ing 29 on the last nine to take the
first round lead today in Tam
O'Shanter's $15,000 All-American
golf jamboree.
Texas-born Barnum, who turn-
ed pro four years ago after a suc-
cessful amateur career around
Chicago, needed only 25 putts in
fashioning his 35-29 card against
Tam's 36-36-72 par for 6,915
yards.
HE ONE-PUTTED every green
but the 10th on the back nine in
his fantastic windup which was a
stroke better than Byron Nelson's
record 30 set in 1945.
Putts dropped from three to
20 feet for the 39-year-old, b
foot 4 inch wibard as he grab-
bed a three-stroke lead over
gaudily-garbed Jimmy-. Demaret
in the first lap towards top prize
of $2,250.
For four hours Demaret had led
the money-hungry pack of 116
pros with his 34-33-67, only to
relinquish it close to nightfall to
Barnum, whose biggest victory
since 1947 was winning the Michi-
gan pro-amateur event several
weeks ago.
' : #
BARNUM DID much to bring
the pro contingent to the front in
the opening round.
Frank Stranahah opened de-
fence of his All-American ama-
teur crown with a sizzling pair
of 33's for 66 which looked as if
is would put the play-for-pay
boys to shame. The Toledo
weightlfter stampeded to a six
stroke lead over the simon-pure
field of 31.

. .i
+ ~f.

Red Sox Take Two Ganes
From Browns; Dodgers Win

: -

Major League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

IRVIN SAFE ON TRIPLE-New York Giants' outfielder Monte Irvin slides safely into third base,
scoring two men, in third inning against the Cubs in Chicago. Ransom Jackson, Cubs' third base-
man, attempts as Giants Manager Leo Durocher signals for a slide. Irvin hit a line drive to center
field.

NO MORE WALTZING:

Joe in Odd Role Now that de's Champ

By WHITNEY MARTIN
NEW YORK--(A)-There was a
time when an announcement by
Jersey Joe Walcott that he could-
n't fight for a year would have
been greeted with rousing cheers,
with the fans asking what they
had done to deserve such a break.
That was when Jersey Joe Wal-
cott was just another fighter, tak-
ing bouts wherever he could get
them, and turning in some per-
formances which threatened to
set back the art of fisticuffs 40
years, or at least to the date of
his birth.
HE WAS a clutch, grab, hit and
run performer who carried cau-
tion into the ring with him so he
himself wouldn't be carried out.
Then came the third Charles
fight, and the unveiling of a
new Walcott. The erstwhile

lamb suddenly had become a li- ple. Good or bad, a heavyweight
on. He carried the fight to champion still is the flag-bearer
Charles, and was giving him a of the fight game.
thorough beating when that
crunching left hook came out IT HAS BEEN decided that Jer-
of nowhere to send the cham- sey Joe will not meet Charles in a
pion slumping to the canvas in return bout this year. We under-
an inert heap. stood there was a return-bout
So now Jersey Joe is champion, clause in the contract, a 90-day
and whereas before the question provision or something like that.
of when and how often he would Apparently such provisions are
fight concerned primarily himself written in through habit, and are
and the wife and kiddies, it now no more significant than a hole
concerns a great number of peo- in a doughnut.
ieating 0Advocatesoft Policy
Toward Bao-ballt in Hearings

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-(/P)-A brilliant
relief pitching effort by Bob Cain
preserved a shutout for the De-
troit Tigers and starter Hal White
yesterday as the Bengals defeated
the New York Yankees, 6-0.
The loss cut the Yanks' first-
place edge over Boston's Red Sox
and Cleveland's Indians.
THE BLANKING was New
York's third of the season, Cain
and Early Wynn, Cleveland right-
hander, previously having held
the champions scoreless. Detroit
led 2-0, when Cain entered the
game with the bases full in the
seventh, none out and a two balls
and no strike count on pinch-hit-
ter Johnny Hopp.
Cain then struck out Hopp and
fanned both Billy Martin and
Gene Woodling to retire the side.
The slim lefthander retired the
side in order in the final pair of
innings, whiffing two more in the
process.
The Boston Red Sox regained
some of their lost ground in the
American League's blistering
pennant race with a 12-3 and
11-6 doubleheader sweep over
the lowly but aroused St. Louis
Browns.
R ay Scarborough kept the
Brownies' eight hits well scattered
during -the opener. But they be-
came savage in the seventh inning
while scoring all of their night-
cap's runs.
* *, *
THE POWER-PACKED Brook-
lyn Dodgers went on another hit-
ting spree and walloped the Pitts-
burgh Pirates 10-5.
Philadelphia unloaded on
Herman Wehmeier and Ken
Raffensberger in the eighth inn-
ingsto defeat the Cincinnatij
Reds, 7 to 5.
Wehmeier, who has won only
one game this season, turned back
repeated threats until the eighth,
holding out a 5-1 lead. Then he
walked the first two batters and
Granny Hamner filled the sacks
with a single.
BIG BOB RUSH checked the
New York Giants with four hits
as the Chicago Cubs pounded out
a 6 to 3 triumph before 7,966.
The victory gave the Cubs an
edge of three games to two in
the series and dropped the sec-
ond place New Yorkers ten full
games behind the Brooklyn
Dodgers.
Posting his first triumph since
June 19, Rush stopped the Giants
without a hit from the start of the
third until Monte Irvin opened
the ninth with a triple.
FLEET JIM BUSBY, inserted in
the lineup in the eighth inning as
a defensive measure, cracked his
fourth home run of the season in

the tenth inning to give the re-
bounding Chicago White Sox a
4 to 3 victory over the Philadel-
phia Athletics.
Big Gus Zernial smashed his
24th homer of the campaign off
winner Randy Gumpert in the
fifth for the A's.
Steve Gromek's four-hit pitch-
ing and long range blows by Larry
Doby and Luke Easter gave Cleve-
land a 5-2 victory over Washing-
ton. The win moved the Indians
into a second place tie with Bos-
ton only one game back of New
York.
The contest between the Boston
Braves and the St. Louis Cardinals
was called last night in the last
of the ninth with the Braves lead-
ing 7-3 to permit the Braves to
catch a train for Chicago. The
game will be played out later in
the season. Bob Elliott had driven
in four runs with two homers and
a single. Sid Gordon and Sam
Jethroe also homered for Boston.

New York ..
Boston ......
Cleveland ...
Chicago,....
Detroit ......
Washington .
Philadelphia
St. Louis ....

W
60
60
60
56
45
44
39
31

L
37
39
39
45
51
55
62
67

Pct.
.619
.606
.606
.554
.469
.444
.386
.316

GB
1
6
14!4
17
23
29

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 6, New York 0.
Boston 12-11, St.Louis 1-6.
Chicago 4, Philadelphia 3 (10 in-
nings).
Cleveland 5, Washington 2.
* * *
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at New York (2)-Bryne
(3-4) and McDonald (0-1) vs. Raschi
(15-6) and Weisler (0-0).
Chicago at Washington (N)-Rogo-
vin (6-6) vs. Hudson (3-6).
Cleveland at Philadelphia (N)-
Garcia (13-7) vs. Zoldak (3-5).
Detroit at Boston (N)--Trout (5-11)
vs. McDermott (6-5).

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 10, Pittsburgh 5.
Chicago 6, New York 3.
Philadelphia 7, Cincinnati 5.
Boston 7,C incinnati 5.
Boston 7, St. Louis 3 (game iiicom-
plete).
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (N)-
Roberts (13-8) vs. Law (3-6).
Brooklyn at Cincinnati (N)-RO4
(15-2) vs. Blackwell (9-10).
New York at St. Louis (N)-Maglie
(15-4) vs. Brecheen (6-2).
Boston at Chicago-Bickford (11-8)
vs. Minner (4-10).

Brooklyn ....«
New York ...
Philadelphia
St. Louis ....
Boston ......
Cincinnati ..
Chicago .....
Pittsburgh ..

1

W
64
57
50
46
46
45
41
40

L
33
46
50
49
49
5z
52
58

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
FOR SALE
RCA Automatic record changer, 78 rpm,
$10. Call evenings 3-4701. )174
AUGUST SPECIALS
for students and no nstudents
Time............. ...$3.57 (44 wks.)
Life.............$7.27 (70 wks.)
Redbook......... $2.50 ($3 in Sept.)
McCalls .......$2.50 ($3 in Sept.)
Am. Home... ........$2.00 (13 mos.)
U.S. News &
World Report......$3.27 (44 wks.)
Student Periodical Agency, 2-8242
)173
D-FROSTO-MATIC ICE BOX DEFROS-
TERS-Originally $12.95. Now $4.00.
Brand new, guaranteed. )172
MOTORCYCLE WINDSHIELDS-1 win-
ter, 1 summer--$12. Phone 2-1014. )171
PRICES ROLLED BACK
Men's Seersucker Pants $2.00
Navy "T" Shirts 39c
Short Sleeve Sport Shirts $1.49
Rayon Swim Trunks $1.66
Open 'til 6 P.M.
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington )170

FOR SALE
TROPICAL FISH - Aquatic plants,
aquarium supplies. Sure there's a
place in Ann Arbor. Call 3-0224. )169
PARAKEETS, Canaries, and Finches--
New and used cages. 562 So. Seventh,
Phone 5330. )164
FOR RENT
WOMAN graduate student wanted to
share apartment. Call 3-4073 after
6 p.m.) )40F
3-BEDROOM HOME-Completely fur-
nished, Aug. 18 to Sept. 18 while own-
ers are on vacation. Located between
campus and 'U' Hospital. Call 2-6654.
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOR MEN-Spacious, double, in beau-
tiful home. Shown before noon or
after 4 P.M., 1430 Cambridge. )84R
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. )80R
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY-Gernan 21 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann, 2-7909. )14M
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE -
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hill and Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. )3X
PERSONAL
PLEASE-Phone our office (2-8242 be-
fore ordering or renewing any maga-
zine. We can probably save you
$ $ $ $, time and trouble. Student
Periodical Agency, 330 Municipal Ct.
Bldg. )65P

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
cialize in doing summer dresses.
TYPING WANTED-To do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
)408
HELP WANTED
MOTHER'S HELPER in home until Pall
Term in exchange for room and board.
Phone 3-8454. )62H
STORE CLERK for Saturdays for Men's
Furnishing and Shoe Store. Prefer ex-
perienced man. Apply Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington St. )60H
TRANSPORTATION
COLORED WOMAN leaving for Phila-
delphia in new Plymouth about Aug.
5. Would like companion. Call 2-0779
for information. )39T
WANTED'TO BUY
WOMAN'S AND MANp ENG. BIKE. Call
3-1511, ext. 2176 or 2-8732. )18x

Pct.
.660
.553
.500
.484
.484
.464
.441
.408

GB
10
15%
17
17
18
21
24

SOWENS
WSomething for a coot
U Dsummer evening?
(I U
A beautiful wool Mexican rebozo (Stole
to you) in lovely colors at $10.50.
You will find yourself wearing this the year(
round. It isso useful and beautiful.
500 East Liberty Phone 3-8781
No waiting or worrying
over parking
. ~BEER WINE "
SOFT DRINKS
KEG BEER
Open Daily 10 A.M.,
Sunday, Noon to 7 P.M.

WASHINGTON - () - Rep.
Keating (R-N.Y.) said yesterday
that "Congress had better be
darned careful before it starts
tampering with baseball."
Keating is a member of a judi-
ciary subcommittee studying whe-
ther baseball violates anti-trust
laws.
T HE COMMITTEE had an op-
en date yesterday. But it goes
back into action today with
George Trautman, boss of the
minors, again on the stand.
Trautman will finish reading a
31-page statement he started
Wednesday.
Some committee members,
4

notably Chairman Celler (D-
N.Y.), h a v e suggested that
baseball needs a rather com-
plete overhauling. Celler sug-
gested that the future may
bring four major leagues, and
said baseball should start right
now reorienting its thinking.
Keating told a reporter that he
takes a different view.
"I have been impressed with
how complicated baseball is," he
said. "And I've also been im-
pressed by the testimony of the
men who have studied the game
for years.
"We can't possibly become ex-
perts on baseball in a week or
a month. I think we will have
to pay a lot of attention to what
they have to say."
What they have to say, so far,
adds up to about this:
"If you don't want to destroy
baseball, you had better leave it
pretty much alone."
Keating said he doesn't think
the committee had any business
looking into baseball in the first
place.
"At a time when the world is
on fire it seems to me that we
have more important things to
do," he said. "I still think so."

Today and Tomorrow
OH SUZANNAH
in color
ROD CAMERON
QUICK SAND
MICKEY ROONEY

(

T"

-6

"Be gone, you cur, sir!!" screams the heroine
In the Department of Speech Production
"THE STREETS OF NEW YORK"
DION BOUCICAULT'S MELODRAMA
TONIGHT and SATURDAY, Aug. 3-4, at 8 P.M.
Tickets: $1.20-90c-60c (Tax Incl.)
Box Office Open Daily 10 A.M.-8 P.M.
}Q LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

Plenty of
Hot Weather Ahead ..
and the

t

STARTS
SATURDAY

s
1
x ®4
s;,;
'
I , .?...

TO 6:30 P.M.
Continuous
Daily from 1 P.M.

E

I

I

Late Show Sat. Nite
Come as Late as 11 P.M.
J S
tgether
lovin'est
musical
in

I

Today & Saturday
FOR TH FI TIiME IN
I 100-YEAR HISTORY
THE CAMERA GOES
-INSIDETHEWALLS OF
PRESENTED BY WARNER BROS.
S ARNG STEVE DAVID
COCH RAW"BR IAN 0~
PHILIP CAREY-TED de CORSIA- DOROTHY HART
COMING SUNDAY!
JEANNE
CRAIN

has C-O-O-L Dresses
for those H-O-T DAYS at
August Clearance Prices

a moon!

II II I n r - .- . I e ~ * ~ r rP~d

Group of DRESSES
Cottons, Sheers, Voiles,
Chambrays, Tissue Ging-
hams . . . I piece and
sunbacks with jackets .. .
also Rayon Sheers and
Bembergs. Sizes 10-44,
121 to 24 , 9 to 15.

Groups of SLIPS
and PETTICOATS
Cotton and Rayons .
Lace Trimmed.
1.98 2.98 3.98
originally to 6.00

N

I

7.00 10.00

13.00

11

r

H

Nll

I

I

I

i

*T& n r

I

... _ i.. 0 C1C* :_ -)C nn I

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