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July 23, 1950 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-07-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHWXN OXILt

SUNDAY, JULY 2, 193

_________________________________ ___ U

7

-W mw w - - - -

LLEGE ROUNDUP:

Minnesota's YP Hit
Circulation Snags.

By NANCY BYLAN
Young Progressives at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota are having
troubles.
Zealously determined to circu-
lte the Stockholm Peace Appeal
On their campus, despite its "Red"
_rand, they planned a 'summer-
kng campaign for signatures, in-
eluding a giant student peace-rally
and an "Atom Blues" Dance
ldance away those atom blues).
OPPOSITION, however, finally
with
WENDY OWEN
Bob Keeshan, the wordless
lown Clarabell, scourge of the-
'jowdy Doody teletision show,
ose from part-time page at NBC
to his present position in a mere
hree years to prove that a lot of
unpredictable things happen in
television.
He met Bob Smith, Howdy Doo-
dy's emcee, when Smith first came
to NBC from Buffalo in 1947, and
oined with him as man-Friday to
do behind-the-scenes production
Jobs.'
* * *
ONE TIME Smith needed a prop
out in front of the cameras, and
KPeshan went out, dressed in dap-
per business suit, to give it to him.
This went on for several perform-
,4ces minus Smith's wholehearted
aproval. But finally he relented,
Biggesting that Keeshan wear a
clown suit at his next appearance.
Ad Keeshan; when he went into
e-up, drew a tremendous res-
pse from the Howdy Doody
1,.t.ners.
Glarabell was in. Ringling
Brothers Circus now boasts a
permanent Clarabell of its own,
and another Clarabell is opera-
ting at a Long Island beach.
Keeshan himself, is an Irish-
oboking gent with curly brown hair
jd a father who was born in Tip-
prary. He's building model rail-
toa4 cars for relaxation these days.
AN NBC employe spotted
Wanted" criminal Myron Selik a
few minutes after the fugitive had
been described on the "Wanted"i
program. The manhunt still con-
tnues.t
PROF. HAROLD C. UREY, of
ythe University of Chicago declared,
'I don't want to see a hydrogen
bomb built," over the air recently.
'But if there's the remotest pos-
sibility one can be built, I want
,Ainerica to know about it."
EVERYONE'S TUNING in to
hear the evening news since the
Korean war started, according to
a- recent Hooper Survey. Theset
newscasts rates are up 76 per centt
over last year.
S* * *r
THE JAZZ FIENDS who back
the "Chamber Music Society oft
Lower Basin Street," an NBC show
aired Saturdays, all have back-
grounds in classical music, inter-
views have shown.
Fuchs To Speak on
'Theatre' Tuesday
Theodore Fuchs, director of the-
atre at Northwestern University,
will speak on the "Theatre" be-
fore the Graduate Speech Sym-s
posium at 4 p.m. Tuesday in the I
Fest Conference Room of Rack- c

forced the YP chairman to call a
meeting to discuss plans for end-
ing the peace campaign.
But only one person showed
by at the meeting. He was not
a member of the YP.
Meanwhile, the sheriff of Min-
neapolis announced that his com-
mittee on internal security is
keeping close tab on circulators of
the peace petitions.
MINNESOTA was also having
fire problems. A barn at the Uni-
versity's agricultural station at
Morris burned down, leaving one
bull as yet, unaccounted for.
The barn's 60 head of Hol-
stein cattle were in pasture at
the time of the conflagration,
which is believed to have been
caused by the spontaneous com-
bustion of hay stored in the
barn.
In the midst of all this chaos,
the University of Minnesota began
plans for its one-hundredth birth-
day celebration which will last the
entire academic year from July,
1950 to July, 1951, according to the
proclamation of Gov. Luther W.
Youngdahl.
* * *
At the University of Hawaii, a
rule that editors of campus publi-
cations must have had at least
one course in journalism cheated
the managing editor of Ka Leo out
of promotion to the position of
editor-in-chief.
The board of publication ruled
that the managing editor's
newspaper training was equiva-
lent to a formal course in jour-
nalism, but their decision was
overridden by the student coun-
cil, which appointed an asso-
ciate editor to the chief position.
The journalism department also
figured significantly at the Uni-
versity 'of Illinois, where three
journalism faculty members were
appointed advisers to the Daily
Illini.
The publisher of the Illini em-
phasized, that. the faculty mem-
bers would not have censorship
over the paper but would merely
act in a consultant capacity.
* * *
OTHER PUBLICATION news
from the University of Illinois re-
vealed the appearance of a new
campus magazine, "Illinois Caper,"
scheduled to hit the newstands in
October and every month there-
after.
"Caper" will feature campus
and city highlights as well as so-
ciety, fashion and sports. Ar-
ticles will be written with a de-
emphasis on sex and low humor.
Its staff expects "Caper" to be a
cross between Life and the New
Yorker.
*. * *
SUMMER WEATHER proved'
too much for a column-writer on
the Silver and Gold, student news-
paper at the University of Colo-
rado. He offered what he called a
"math nifty" as the antidote for
too much studying:
"Write down your age.
"Multiply by 2.
"Add 5.
"Multiply by 50.
"Subtract 365.
"Add the amount of all the
loose change in your pocket un-
der a dollar.
"Add 115.
"The first two figures of that
result are your age, and the last
two are your change."
For the convenience of Univer-
sity of Michigan students The
Daily's mathematical expert has
condensed this problem into a
simpler form: 100x plus y.,

-Daily-Bob Lewis
MUTE TESTIMONY OF DAYS OF YORE-Pre-Haven Hall conflagration days are recalled by
these doors, formerly leading 'to the sanctity of history professors' offices, leaning forlornly up
against a tree in front of the gaunt, 87-year old wreck that used to be a University landmark. As yet
none of the professors whose names appear on the doors have bothered to buy the doors, which are
up for sale with all the rest of the remains of Haven Hall.
DRAMATISTS ON TOUR:
Oxford Players T Open Thursday

WOODWINDS, STRING
Collegium
To Per for
The Collegium Musicum under
the direction of Louise Cuyler will
present a concert at 8:30 p.m.
Monday in the Rackham Assem-
bly Hall.
The concert will be divided into
two parts: the first section devoted
to music for woodwinds, and mu-
sic for flute and harpsichord; the
second to a string sextet and a
vocal croup accompanied by
string's.
THE PROGRAM includes "Can-
zona per sonare" by G. Gabrieli,
"Six Pieces" by Johann Pezel, and
"Allegro and Air from King Ar-
thur," by Purcell. These will be
performed by Charles Kirsch and
Richard Dunham, trumpets, Char-
les Houser, horn, Leslie Bassett,
trombone, William Weichlein, bas-
soon with Andrew Minor conduct-
ing.
Following will be "Suite in G
major" by Antoine Dornel con-
sisting of "Prelude, La Bellone,
La D'Houville, La BxxDxx, La
Zephyr, and Chaconne," "John!
Come Kiss Me Now," by ° an
anonymous 17th century com-
poser, and Leonardo Vinci's
"Sonata in D major." Perform-
ers will be Lorraine and Nathan
Jones.
After intermission the program
will continue with "Two Fantasias
a 6" composed in 1635 by John
Jenkins. These were collated,
transcribed and edited f r o m
manuscripts of the Oxford Bod-
leian Music School by Robert A.
Warner. The string group will in-
clude Geraldine Schmoker and
Henry Wenzel, violins; Kurt
Schuster and Emil Simonel, violas;
Charlotte Schuster and Daphne
Ireland, cellos; conducted by Ro-
bert Warner.
The final selections will be "Di-
ologue entre Madelaine et Jesus"
and "Laudate Dominum omnes
gentes" (Psalm 116) by Marc-An-
taine Charpentier transcribed and
edited by Wiley Hitchcock. Soloists
will include Grace Hampton, so-
'Michi gan' Ni glts
To Be Held in State
"Michigan" nights will be held
throughoutthe state during the
next two months, to enable par-
ents of incoming students to learn
more about the University.
THE SHORT BOB
FOR LADIES
" individually styled
* five hair stylists
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

YS:
FRATERNITY
'JEWELRY '
uscum SOUVENIRS - GIFTS
TRADITIONAL- MUGS U
SDIAMONDS - WATCHES
S ConcertUPS-TROPHIES,
L. G. BALFOUR Co.
1319 S. University
prano; Richard Miller and Robert Home of the
Pearson, tenors; Jack Wilcox, bari- Official Michigan Ring"
tone; Alfred Boyington and James Summer Hours, ten till five;
Vandersall, violins and Daphne O closed Saturdays.
Ireland, cello.
Special Sale
of
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
READERS & GRAMMARS

FRENCH, SPANISH,
LATIN,

ITALIAN, GERMAN,
& GREEK

9c to 99c at
FOLLETT'S

BOOKSTORE

State St. at N. University

The playbill this weekend will
feature a special presentation by
the Oxford University Players of
"The Alchemist" by Ben Johnson
at 8 p.m. Thursday, and Shakes-
peare's "King Lear" at the same

time Friday, in the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre.
The group is a select company
of Oxford University dramatists.
Since Oxford has no play produc-
tion department, the students are

forced to
groups onii
colleges.

form amateur acting
their own within their
* * *

Socials, Picnics To Highlight
Week's Church Activity Plans

An ice cream social, a picnic,
outdoor meetings and discussions
are on the agenda of the churches
for this week.
In' Rev. Harold DeVries' absence,
Rev. Lonnie Smith will speak at
11 a.m. at the Grace Bible Church
today on the topic, "He Is Able:"
The ':30 evening services will be
conducted by Mr. George Pannel
who will speak on "Looking Unto
Jesus. '*
THE CONGREGATIONAL, Dis-
ciples, Evangelical and Reformed
Guild will hold a dinner at 6 p.m.
today i n t h e Congregational
Church on State and E. Williams
Sts.
Prof. William Toth, depart-
ment of history at Franklin and
Marshall College at Lancaster,
Pennsylvania, who is here with
the Near Eastern Institute, will
speak on "The Historic Church
Under Persecution."'
The Lutheran Student Associa-
tion will have an informal mee'ting
at 4 p.m. in the Student Center at
1304 Hill Street.
ON TUESDAY, Norma Bloom-
quist, Lutheran missionary in Li-
beria, will lead a discussion in the
Student Center on the "Justifi-
Finney Will Give
Folk Music Talk
The Inter-Arts Union will spon-
sor an informal discussion and
presentation of folk music at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in the League.
Prof. Ross Lee Finney will lead
the discussion to which IAU has
invited the public.

cation of Christian Mission." Miss
Bloomquist has been selected by
the Liberian government to direct
the literary program and is study-
'ing here in the Linguistics Insti-
tute.
T h e Students Evangelical
Chapel a t Washtenaw, and
Forest Sts. will present Rev. Ar-
nold Brink of Calvin College and
Seminary in Grand Rapids,
Michigan, at both the 10 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. services today.
The Wesleyan Guild of the Me-
thodist Church will hold a supper
and fellowship hour at 5:30 p.m.
today followed by a meeting. Prof.
A. K. Stevens will speak on "Chris-
tianity and War" at 6:30 p.m.
ON WEDNESDAY, the Wesleyan
Guild will hold a "Do-Drop.-In"
Tea from 4 to 5:30 p.m. and on
Friday, an ice cream social and
square dance will be held at 8:30,
p.m. in the parking lot at the rear
of the Foundation for the benefit
of its Displaced Persons Fund.
The Westminster Guild of the
First Presbyterian Church will
hold its last program of the
summer at 5:30 p.m. in the so-
cial hall with Prof. Howard Mc-
Clusky .speaking on "Education
for the Atomic Age." The supper
will be served at 6:30 p.m.
The Canterbury House of the
EpiscopalChurch will hold a pic-
nic meeting on Crooked Lake to-
day. Cars will leave the Canter-
bury House at 4:30 p.m. Mrs. E.
Struan Robertson, formerly a lec-
turer in classics at Rhodes Uni-
versity, South Africa, will lecture
on "Reaching for the Stars in the
Beloved Country," concerning the
native African striving for better
things.

THERE ARE two inter-college,
entire University companies, the
Oxford University Dramatic Soci-
ety and the Oxford University Ex-
perimental Theatre Club, and
these two groups have supplied
most of the actors for this touring
company.
The whole tour is an Anglo-
American project, sponsored and
organized by the International
Research Fund, an American
non-profit educational organiza-
tion which in cooperation with
the Student Travel Service has
given almost 100 scholarships
for European students to visit
the United States this summer.

READING SUGGESTIONS
FICTION
"Wait For Tonmorrow"-Robert Wilder $3.50
"World Enough and Time"-Robert Penn Warren $3.50
"The Town"-Conrad Richter $3.50
NON-FICTION
"The Little Princesses"-Marian Crawford $3.50
"America Begins"-Richard M. Dorson $4.50
"Men Without Faces"--Louis Budenz $3.50
"Comes the Comrade"-Alexandra Orme $4.00
WAHURS
U UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
316 South State Street
"Michigan's Oldest and Most Complete Bookstore"

SUMMERTIME

Jonson's
claims to
which will
transmdte
but is also
tune-teller

Alchemist not only
have found the elixir
cure every disease and
all metals into gold,
at once magician, for-
and crook.

* * *
THE SATIRE has survived the
fall of alchemy and the closing of
many a religious dispute because
he is mocking something more
lasting than the mere foibles of
his day.
Tickets for the two prouductions
are on sale in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn box-office, which is open ev-
ery day from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
according to Ann Drew, publicity
manager.
TYPEW RITERS
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED
STUDENT SUPPLIES
G.I. Requisitions
Accepted on'*Supplies Only
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St. Ph. 7177
fountain pens repaired

.....f::.".... .......... ........................ J: J: ........ . .....

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iw:.a

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