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July 21, 1950 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TT~ E .l ICHWA LY

FRIDAY, JULY 21, 1950

U-

IDIVIDUAL RIGHTS:
NSA Names Conditions
For Training of Citizen

ANCIENT DOCUMENT:
Magna Carta Applies
To Today's Problems

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Students from
very corner of the nation will attend
he Third Annual Student Congress,
ug. 23-31, at the University. This is
ie third article in a series which
ill present many of the issues they
ill face.)
At conferences in March and
ne, students in the Michigan
egion of the U.S. National Stu-
-nt Association (NSA) laid down
e conditions they felt were es-
ntial to the training for citizen-
ip in the democratic society by
e academic community.
The Region decided it had to
oose between 'rights' as belong-
g to the individual student, or
)nditions' necessary for the edu-
tional community as a whole.
TWO ARGUMENTS were
ought out against 'rights':
1. In three years, NSA has been
fable to agree on'a philosophical
atement df what students 'rights'
ould be.
2. Statement of rights tend to
it students in the position of
essuring faculty and adminis-
ators-a move which is usually
iongly resisted.
MICHIGAN'S conditions are as
Blows:
"1. Recognition that the stu-
nt, in the area of off-campus
tivities, has all the rights and
sponsibilities of the citizen and
at in exercising these he in no
Ly impairs his standing at the
stitution unless he uses its name.
"2. Competent and stimulative
struction.
"3. Adequate library facilities.
"4. Adequate vocational guid-
Lce.
15. Provision for reasonable fa-
ities to conduct research freely
thin the educational community
d the freedom to publish, dis-
ss and exchange any findings or
commenda ions with any indi-
-ual or group, on or off campus.
"6. Existarice of recognized
annels for the consideration of
ident opinion on such phases of
e educational community as the
licy of the institution, planning
the curriculum and the selec-
n of personnel.
"7. Notification in writing of any
.ange in the student's status that
ight lead to suspension, expul-
>n or any other severe disciplin-
y action; provision for filing an
swer; and, at the opinion of the
cused, trial by a body including
udent representatives.
"8. Existence of recognized pro-
cures by which changes in the
flicies and regulations of the in-
itution or any of its instrumen-
lUties shall be made known to
e educational community.:
"9. A clear and concise state-
ent of regulations at the time of
Itering and proper notification to

the educational community of any
changes in the regulations of the
institution before they are put in-
to effect.-'
"10. Participation of the stu-
dents on a representative basis
through their student government
in the formulation of the general
educational policy of the institu-
tion.
"11. Establishment of a demo-
cratic student government with
the authority to administer, legis-
lat, and adjudicate in all areas of
student concern with adequate
provision for referendum, recall,
and petition.
"12. Participation of students
through their student government
in setting up and having control
of and responsibility for alloca-
tion of activities fees.
"13. Institutional recognition of
any student organization upon the
filing of a statement of purpose,
constitution, and membership list;
provided that the group meets the
requirements of legality of pur-
pose and financial responsibility;
and the provisions thbat the con-
stitution or purposes include no
discrimination as to race or reli-
gion except where the avowed pri-
mary purpose of the organization
is to bring together members of
one specific racial or religious
group; recognition to be revoked
upon proof of the group's violation
of its own statement of purpose of
the -regulations of the institution.
"14. The use of campus facilities
by recognized organizations to car-
ry out the organizations' purpose.
"115. Adequate provision of facil-
itiesfor students to hear speakers
of their choice on topics of their
choice.
"16. Regular independent publi-
cations free of any censorship or
other pressure aimed at control-
ling editorial policy, with free sel-
ection and removal of editorial
staff, reserved solely to the pub-
lisher.'
"17. -The freedom of admission
to educational institutions of ev-
ery student who meets the insti-
tution's 'specific academic stand-
ards; -regardless of race, creed,
color, sex, national origin, or poli-
tical belief, except that non-co-
educational institutions may dis-
criminate on the basis of sex; sec-
tarian institutions may require in-
formation as to whether students
are of that sect which supports
the institution.
"18. Institutional encouragement
of and adequate facilities for stu-
dent participation in extra-curri-
cular activities."
NEXT: The Student Legisla-
ture amendment to the Regional
stand.

Although the Magna Carta is
ageless, it is more important as
a charter of human liberties today
than at any other time in our
history, Chancellor T. R. Milford,
legal custodian of the Magna Car-
ta, said in a lecture yesterday.
"While the Magna Carta is of-
ficially dated June 15, 1215, it be-
longs to the present as well as the
past," he continued.
* * *
THE PURPOSES of the Magna
Carta were strictly limited by the
circumstances of the time, Chan-
cellor Milford asserted.
"The judgment of the peers
against the accused and the feu-
dal law of the land were taken
together. This clause protected
only those directly accused or
attacked by the king and his
officers and not those attacked
by anyone else," he explained.
The Magna Carta gave the bar-
ons the traditional rights they re-
quested, but it actually did not
state general principles, Chancel-
lor Milford continued.
"One clause specifies that the
king couldn't raise money by ways
not sanctioned by custom, such as
delaying or selling anyone's right
to justice."
"This eventually evolved into the
king not being able to raise money
except by consent of Parliament,"
he explained.
* * *
THE MOST FAMOUS chapter is
No. 39 which states that no free
man shall be arrested or detained
IC Plans U. S.
Western Tour
A Pacific Coast Tour is in store
for interested foreign students.
Again this year the Internation-
al Center is sponsoring its Fourth
Annual Trip to the Pacific Coast
Aug. 20 through Sept. 13.
The tour has been planned to
enable the travelers to see as much
of the West as possible.
The trip will cost $246, including
transportation, hotels, sightseeing
and insurance. Interested students
may get in contact with Homer
Underwood or Charles Arnade at
the International Center. Reserva-
tions will be limited.
CAMPUS
OPTICIANS
Conveniently Located
222 Nickels Arcade
Phone 2-9116

in prison without a just cause for
his arrest.
Eventually this jury system came
to mean a guarantee of freedom of
the subject against unlawful ag-
gression and helped in distinguish-
ing our freedom against totalitar-
ian countries, Chancellor Milford
concluded.

TYPEWRITERS
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT 0
REPAIRED
STUDENT SUPPLIES
G.I. Requisitions
Accepted on Supplies Only
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St. Ph. 7177
fountain pens repaired

ASSOCIATED

PICTURE NEWS

PRESS

__.. U
Er .1

RIBBONS and
CORDS
All Colors
PEARLS
white and
gunmetal
Big and
Little Ends
To Fit All
Shell Glasses
SMART WOMEN ARE NEVER
WITHOUT THEIR SPEC-BANDS
HALLERS
717 North University

OLD WORLD CHARM
-Elsbeth Koller, in role of Prin-
cess Hedwiga of Poland, bows
to Landshut, Bavaria, crowds at
pageant celebrating the 15th
century Princess' nuptials.

D 0 G D E L I V E R Y-Leo Felsen carries his Great Dane
entry, Leo Buck, to the show ring to keep the dog's feet from get-
ting muddy, at the Skokie Valley Kennel Club exhibition, Chicago.

i

' 'e

..

P A L S - Kenneth Newnham, 6, nroute to Canada, sits on a
New York pier With his Springer stianiel Lassie, and her litter of'.
puppies born aboard the motorship Batory crossing the Atlantic.

f*

SMOKER AT THREE.
-Three-year-old Harry Emmer,
of Appleton, Wis., who smoked
his first cigar at ten months,
and has. a collection of 25. pipes,
enjoys his favorite brand.

t

it's summer
America's
! a°
\ !
10
t
I'

'time and just the right time for
most famous summer suits

WINE AND WHITE SADDLES
of supple calf with crepe soles
It's just like walking on clouds, traipsing around
in our Modern Age crepe sole saddle oxfords.
They're supple and easy to wear, take to your
casual life like nothing else. They're only
7.95

Shoe Salon

. .
:.
.
t y 1
i
.2 ik
i
r
i+

special 1750
regularly 22.50
This is really a remarkable fashion
event. We can't mention the famous
name and we can't even show you
the famous tag or label - but you know

J'

s/ -.\

WORLD-ENCIRCLING CRAFT - Four men
and a woman left Bordeaux, France, to sail around world on a
scientific trip in this craft made from two boats joined together.

these summer suits because they're

6

the best known of all. Chances
are that you'll recognize the wonder-
fully cool rayon and wool fabric, the
fine immaculate tailoring and the
smart styles which you've seen in all
the fashion magazines. We probably
have your size - but not in every
style or color. So come in and
make your "buy" now - while there's
still some selection available.
Misses -- Petite and Half Sizes
10 to 201/2.

Alpaca lined
Wool gabardine
STADIUM
COAT
i

CONTEST WINNER
- Juanita Mullins, wife of Fort
Worth, Tex., officer, passes judges
at U. S. Army camp to win
"Miss Burtonwood, 1950" com-
petition in Leicester. England.

1

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Um 11

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