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July 20, 1950 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-07-20

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T.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1950

--
x

-

DON'T BE HARSH:
Give the Artist a Break,
He's Sensitive - Finney

Something New Has Been Added

AT HOME AND ABROAD:
Political Scientists Turn
Globe-Trotters for Study-

Sawyer To Speak
On Atomic Energy
Ralph A. Sawyer, dean of the
graduate school, will address the
21st Annual Summer Education
Conference today at 4 p.m. in the

"Give the artist a break," Prof.
Ross Finney of the music school
legged yesterday.
"An artist is a sensitive person,"
he continued, "so don't jump to
,Iriticize him-he may stop creat-
ig if he's mistreated."
BUT THE ARTIST has to res-
>ond to the people, Prof. Finney
;id. "The composers of the last
gentury were so individualistic
hey never gave their audiences a
hance to appreciate a thing they
wrote."
. Using artistic jargon Prof.
Finney explained that we are
now in transition between cul-
tural a n d artistic periods,
searching new cultural core.

Music has untold POWER," he
declared. "It is mainly hypnotic,
and has given rise to such super-
stitions as that the "Tarantella"
can be used to cure snakebite."
* * *
HISTORIANS HAVE ignored
one important field of research-
folk music, Prof. Finney maintain-
ed. "Folk music reflects the feel-
ings of the people.
"For instance," he said, picking
up his guitar, "the Puritans have
often been thought of as stern,
other-wordly people, but their mu-
sic is the seed from which an out-
burst of passionate song sprang in
New England's musical renais-
sance."
He demonstrated this thesis
by playing and singing two of
the Puritans favorite Psalms, the
first and 137th.
"This music was the forerunner
of 'modern jazz," he amplified.
"Note the heavy beat on the last
words of each line. Thiswas trans-
formed into secular music with
such popular melodies as "The Erie
Canal" where the words Sal and
pal struck a more brassy note than
did 'delight' in the psalms."
"This brass finally emerged as
modern jazz."
THE SHORT :BOB
FOR LADIES
" individually styled
" five hair stylists
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

From Frankfurt to Manila,
versity political scientists ar
veling this summer for rese
field study and to advise fo
government officials.
Prof. Russel H. Fifield, a
Eastern expert, is now in the
ipines, the last leg of his Far
tour, where he will study
months.
* * *
HE VISITED Korea wher
interviewed South KoreanF
dent Syngman Rhee, and he
to Japan and Okinawa. Befor
turning to the States in the
he will fly to Singapore and
Delhi.
Prof. Harold Dorr is in Fr
furt, Germany for the sum
as consultant in German!
ernmental affairs for the '
Department.
His job is to advise Ge
state legislators and to enco
them to use more democratic
cedure.
Back in the States, Prof. C
rel Heady is making a compar
study of administrative proce
in Wisconsin, North Dakota,
ifornia and Oklahoma.
THESE ARE states which
adopted administrative proc
acts, fashioned after a mod

Uni- drawn up by the American Bar University High School auditor-
e tra- Association. ium.
earch, Walter O. Filley, Jr. will go to Dean Sawyer will speak on "Ato-
reign Zurich early in September to at- mic Energy in Peace and War."
tend the first meeting of the Inter-
Far national Political Science Associa- o
Phil- tion, organized by UNESCO.f FRATERNITY
East Filley is spending this month in FRATERNITY
three Quebec, gathering material he will JEWELRY
present at the Association's meet- SOUVENIRS - GIFTS
ing. TRADITIONAL MUGS
re he DIAMONDS - WATCHES
Presi- * CUPS - TROPHIES
opped Miliord To Falk L. G. BALFOUR CO.
re re- Chancellor T. R. Milford of Lin- 1319 S. University
fall, coln Cathedral, England, legal cus- 4 "Home of the
New todian of the Magna Carta, will Official Michigan Ring"
discuss the famous document un- Summer Hours, ten till five;
ank- der his care at 4:15 p.m. today in = closed Saturdays.
nmer the Rackham Amphitheatre. I o e.... o..-so....
gov-
State
rman NEW SHIPMENT OF IMPORTED LINEN
urage X BRIDGE SETS
pro- 1
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edure 330 MAYNARD STREET PHONE 2-3600
el setb <><= o<=<=oo< o-< <

ENJOY
The beauty of fine
ORIENTAL
RUGS

-Daily-BoO Lewis
COMES THE REVOLUTION-Women outnumber men at a table in the Union taproom, where eat-
ing privileges have been extended to League members for the summer. This policy, though tempor-
ary, does not entirely agree with the Union membership.

s a

* * * *

Closing.for Summer
35% to 45% disc.
on all pieces
A Good Investment

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334

L. MANGOUNI
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1

LATEST RELEASES
CONCERT HALL
Vivaldi--Concerto in B Flat "La Notte," for Basoon,
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Concerti for Flute and Strings.
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ALLEGRO
Songs of Henry Purcell by John Brownlee, Baritone
WESTMINSTER
Brahms-Marienlieder, Op. 22
Four Songs for Women's Voices, Op. 17
by Der Wiener Kammerchor
Dvorak-Sonata in F Major, Op. 57
Four Romantic Pieces, Op. 75
Peter Rybar-Violin & Granz Holletschek-Piano
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Michel Haydn-Turkish Suite
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TE RAD & RECORD SHOP
715 North University Phone 2-0542

I

Michigan NSA
Lays Basis
For Congress
(Continued fron Page 1)
"An educational community is
an integral part of the society in
which it exists. In the United
States, the purposes of the edu-
cational community and the in-
stitutions of which it is composed
is to provide the media for the
physical, intellectual, social, civic,
and moral development in which
a student can prepare more fully
to function as an individual in a
democratic society.
"Since intelligent inquiry, well-
organized thought, good human
relations and intergroup relations,
tolerance of the people who hold
divergent viewpoints and under-
standing of those viewpoints, and
the ability to contribute to a dy-
namic 'culture are essential attri-
butes of democratic citizenship,
primary emphasis. must be given
to fostering the use of these attri-
butes. This growth can take place
only in 'an educational institution
which is based on cooperation,
understanding and maximum indi-
vidual participation among the ad-
ministration, faculty and students
of the institution. Certain neces-
sary conditions must obtain in
relation to each of the component
parts of the institution in order
that the concept of the educa-
tional community may be a reality.
"Speaking on behalf of the
American Student, the United
States National Student Associa-l
tion maintains that among these+
conditions are:"
THAT STATEMENT constitutesI
the reason given by the Michigan
Region of NSA for the existence of
their proposed 'statement of con-
ditions.' There is no similar pre-
amble in the present NSA Bill of
Rights.
NEXT: Michigan Region lists its
conditions.

IN RATIONAL TEAMS the in-
vasion of women into the cafe-
teria, hitherto open to them only
during football weekends and on
Union dance nights, can be ex-
plained by the League's expansion
program, which has closed the
League cafeteria for the summer.
But no rational excuse will
appease the offended males.
"It's a sign of the times," Irv
Truman Gives
RadioAddress
(Continued from Page 1)
COUPLED with his recommen-
dations, the President voiced a
stiff warning obviously aimed at
Soviet Russia, in these words:
"The free world has made it
clear, through the United Na-
tions, that lawless aggression
will be met with force. This is
the significance of Korea - and
it is a significance whose impor-
tance cannot be overlooked."
Following the speech Congress
leaders set up a fast timetable to-
day to write into law President
Truman's proposal for fighting the
Korean war and setting up a
guard against Conmunist on-
slaughts in other parts of the
world.
* * *
STRONG EVIDENCE of biparti-
san backing for most of his plan
built up within minutes after the
message was read to Congress, with
only an occasional criticism of the
administration.
There was even an audible
undertone of demands that the
nation go farther and faster to-
ward a war footing than the
President recommended.
As if to clear the way for the
program, and for more help to
on-Communist nations - which
Mr. Truman said he will propose
later, the House completed legis-
lative action, 361 to 1, on the $1,-
225,000,000 foreign arms bill. Rep.
Marcantonio (ALP-NY), cast the
"no" vote.

By NANCY BYLAN
Every noon and evening
gruntled males gather in the
ion taproom and bemoan the
of their sacred sanctuary.
It has gone to the girls.
* * *

dis-
Un-
fate

Pollack, Grad., declared. "Women
are worming their way into every-
thing."
"The women's place is in the
home," Bill Ward, Grad., agreed.
I believe that the tradition of the
Union, should be upheld. It's the
one place where fellows can come."
* *
"NOT ONLY THAT," Fred Wil-
liams, '52SM, joined in, "but the
presence of women restricts our
language."
"I haven't noticed that," his
wife responded.
Like all the other women who
are now using the Union facilities,
June Pollack, Grad., thinks the
food is wonderful and doesn't ob-
ject at all to using the side door
and back steps. "In fact, it's more
convenient than the front door,"
she remarked.
Also applauding the convenience
of the side door was Dorothea
Mountz, Grad., who said she spoke
for all the girls at Helen Newberry.
* * *
DO THE WOMEN feel out of
place in the former male strong-
hold?
"Not at all," Rose Schauer,
Spec., replied. "I feel right at
home. I'm grateful to the Union
for extending us the privilege.
If you don't think the food here
is good, just try eating at the
corner drugstore."
However, Carol Shaw, '52, ad-
rnitted she feels a little strange
eating at the Union, because "you
never know how many women will
be there."
"It's much better than the Lea-
gue, though," she asserted. "They
serve us MAN-sized portions."
* * *
BUT EVEN THOUGH the wo-
men would like to keep their newly
acquired privilege, it looks as if
fall will bring a return to status-
quo.
"It -had better," Bob Lerman,
'51, echoed, with a nodat the tele-
vision screen. "I don't wont to have
to look over women's heads to
watch the world series."
CAMPUS
OPTICIANS
Conveniently Located
222 Nickels Arcade
Phone 2-9116

Shirts Swish in Union.
Taproom as Men Moan

PAY- LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY

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Full Pound
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35c Size
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2 for 47C

POPULAR BRANDS
Cigarettes
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plus tax

WI LDROOT
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Two 60c Bottles
59C

100

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938C

Economy Size
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Flashlight
Two Cells
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5 Grain U.S.P.
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Carton of Six
21c

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at this time the selection available is
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