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June 28, 1950 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

League

Offers

Varied

Social

Events

for

Summer

Sessior

* *

,-

* ** * *
Lessons Slated for Ballroom, Square Dancing;
Bridge Instruction, Tournaments Also Planned

Bronze Bust of AlICe C. Lloyd
Will Be Presented to University
Sculptress from Israel Is Carving Memorial
To Be Placed in New Women's Dormitory

Winter or summer, the Women's

Square dancing

lessons areI

League, coed mecca for
student generations, is one
busiest places on campus.

many
of the

An extensive social program will
provide entertainment for men'
and women students every night
of the week during the summer,
session.
* * *
ACTIVITIES will include social
and square dancing, and lessons
in dancing and bridge. The Lea-
gue Library will also be open, as
well as the Grand. Rapids Room
for informal get-togethers.
Stag or drag, students may
dance to music sent, out by the
new Musicon sound system
from 9 p.m. to midnight every
Friday and Saturday in the
League Ballroom beginning this
Friday. Admission is 30 cents
per person.

slated for Mondays from 7:30 to
p.m. Mrs. Val Moffit will teach
the lessons which began Monday.
Tickets for the series are priced
at $1.50, while single lessons are
40 cents.
* * *
JOHN LEKAS, Arthur Murray
instructor, will teach the social
dancing classes which meet on
Tuesdays, beginning yesterday..
Beginning classes are held
from 7 to 8 p.m., while advan-
ced dancers will assemble from
League Council
League Council members
will hold office hours from 3
to 5 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day throughout the summer
session in the Undergraduate
Office of the League.

C ( t> C C) t ) t .t )WG ) 'CAT C H
S4
REPAIRING
HALLER'S JEWELERS
717 North University near Hill Auditorium
ac - .ac- >--oo <-mosso= ~c tc cc < --->oc- cic o

Ca4,2're i'

8 to 9 p.m. Men may purchase
season tickets for $2.50. Women
will be admitted free of charge.
Wednesday evenings will find
the bridge lessons in full swing.
They begin tonight for a six week;
period.s
THE CLASS will be split into
beginning and advanced groups
at the 7 p.m. meeting today. After
the first meeting, beginners will
gather at 7 p.m. and advanced
players will take over at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets for the series are $3. >
Duplicate bridge tournamentsr
will be held tomorrow evening
and will continue to be held at
7:30 p.m. each Thrsday. Sin-
gle lessons are priced at 50 cents.
Master point night will take
place on the second Thursday of
every month. Those who wish more
information about the duplicate
bridge tournaments may call Miss
Hilda Heusel, 5869.
RECREATIONAL facilities in
the Grand Rapids Room include
a television set, piano, juke box
and ping pong table.
The air conditioned Legue
Library offers a comfortable
place for women to study. Men
are not allowed in the Library.
It is open weekdays from 1 to
5:30 p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m. Sun-
day hours are from 2 to 5 p.m.
and 7 to 10 p.m.
Miss Ethel A. McCormick is
social director of the League, as-
sisted by Mrs. Richard Bynum.
Summer Sport
Classes Open
To AllCoeds
Registration is still open for co-
recreational and coed sports in-
struction, Dr. Laurie E. Campbell,
Acting Chairman of the Women's
Physical Education Department,
has announced.
Women students who wish to
learn new sports\ techniques or
brush up on old ones may register
from 8 a.m. until noon and from
1 to 4:30 p.m. in Office 15, Bar-
bour Gymnasium.
Co-recreational sports which
are being offered are riding, ten-
nis, American country dancing
and modern dancing. Sports open
to women only are swimming and
golf.
Coeds who do not know how
to swim are especially urged by
the Department to enroll in the
beginning swimming classes.
Approximately 400 w ome n
usually take part in the summer
physical education courses, Dr.
Campbell said, compared to more
than 1,000 during the regular
school year.
Small sports equipment such as
tennis rackets, bats, balls, and
golf clubs may be rented at a nom-
inal fee at the Women's Athletic
Building.
Wrinle-Proof
Travel-wise women will select
fabrics which do not wrinkle
easily, such as jersey in silk, ra-
yon, cotton, nylon or wool. Many
fabrics are tagged to indicate
wrinkle-shedding features.
I

you are aiwa
just
SEE THE LATES
1. RADIO-PHOI
2. TELEVISION
3. RECORDS, se
4. STRINGED I
5. RADIO andI

MARRIES PROFESSOR-Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Gabourie of
Grand Rapids have announced the marriage of their daughter,
Jacquelyne, to Professor Morris Greenhut. Mrs. Greenhut was
graduated from the University in June, 1949. Professor Greenhut
is on the staff of the English department. The couple is living at
1017 Vaughn St.

A bronze bust of Alice Crocker
Lloyd, Dean of Women here for 20
years until her death in March, is
being presented to the University
by her former co-workers.
The bust will be placed in Lloyd
Hall, the new women's dormitory
which was named in her honor.
* * *
SCULPTRESS for the project, in
remembrance of the Dean, is Mrs.
Ellen Colmar Bernkopf from Is-
rael. Mrs. Bernkopf is working
from a collection of. photographs
of Dean Lloyd.
The bust is still in the begin-
ning stages.
Although Mrs. Bernkopf has in-
terviewed several of Dean' Lloyd's
friends and has studied her
speeches to find a clearer picture
of her, she said that it is difficult
to create in sculpture a person she
has never met or seen.
MRS. BERNKOPF came to Ann
Arbor two years ago when her
husband, Dr. H. Bernkopf, left the
University of Jerusalem, to do vi-
rus research at the University. He
has just returned to Israel, but
Mrs. Bernkopf is staying to com-
plete the bust.
At the age of five Mrs. Bern-
kopf became interested in sculp.
turing. She was born in Han-
over, Germany and studied in
Berlin and later in Paris and
Italy.
Most of her work has been done
in Jerusalem and Europe, she said.
After her marriage she moved to
Israel with her husband, where she
lived for ten years. She has a
10-year-old daughter.
"I AM GLAD to be able to leave
something here because I like Ann
Arbor so much," Mrs. Bernkopf
said.
"The abundance of trees and
foliage, Burton Tower and the
other buildings, the people and
the life in general here all fas-
cinate me," she added.
Associate Dean of Women Mary
Bromage is directing the project.
Other committee members are
Mrs. Leona Diekema, Martha Cook
director; Mrs. Frederick Klein,
director of Mosher; and Miss Ethel
A. McCormick, social director of
the League.
* * *
OTHERS ARE: Mrs. Boaler
Rowles, director of Collegiate Sor-
osis; Mrs. Pauline Elliott, an un-
dergraduate League house direc-
tor; and Mrs. A. W. Baker, a grad-
uate League house director.
This committee represents res-

Contrasting colors and fabrics
are high style now - which means
that your slacks or culottes can
go with the coat from your suit.
The fashion-wise coed will coor-
dinate her clothes by selecting two
or three colors that will blend or
contrast well. Often some drama-
tic or subtle accessory will en-
hance the color scheme.

ident staff members who work.
ed with Dean Lloyd in former
years.
Lynn Fry, supervising architect
for the University, worked with
the committee in selecting the
Lloyd Hall location.
Upon completion, the bust will
be presented to the Board of Re-
gents as an official gift to the
University.

International Center - T
weekly tea will be held from 4
to 6 p.m. tomorrow at the Cent
Miss Genoveva 0. Deleon will
the hostess.
* # *
House Presidents-Presidents
women's residences will meet a
p.m. tomorrow in the League. 'I
room number will be posted.
., Welcomle to
Michigan
We specialize in
00 Short Cuts
Personality Styles
for your comfort
" Fan-cooled Shop
aNooWaiting
* 7 Barbers
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State
ROa DaC== =i=>0 fi=

STUDENT SUPPLIES

IT'S BEEN REAL.. .

I

'Those Who Know' Discuss
Etiquette of Saying Good-bye

Reference Books

Fiction for Summer Reading

SPECIAL ORDERS

IN SMOOTH
WHITE LEATHER
Sizes to 91/2 -AAAA to B

"Don't just stand there, go
home!" say authorities on the
leave-taking etiquette.
Leave-taking, they claim, may
add an awkward note to an other-
wise pleasant visit unless handled
with the proper social grace.
Learning to say good-bye quick-
ly and with ease willemake a
guest instantlyappreciated by his
hosts. It will also be to the guest's
advantage, the latest reportssim-
ply, if he has a plentiful supply
of simply hysterical stories to re-
late half an hour before he leaves.
MRS. AGNES ROGERS ALLEN,
a noted hostess, states that the
guest should wait for a pause in
the conversation - that alone re-
quires more social finesse than
many people possess - and then
start a little story.
As the guest is relating his
tale, he is to rise from his chair,
walk over to his hostess, and
come to the climax of the story
as he stands beside her.
Just when she thinks that he
has something urgent to tell her,
and her alone, he puts out his
hand, says good-bye, and leaves.
* * *
THIS TECHNIQUE is guaran-
teed to make a lasting impression
on any host or hostess.
Married couples have a much
easier time of it. They merely
arrange a quiet high sign, per-
haps a wave of the hand or a
coded phrase.
This fact will be good news to
wives who are attached to men
who think a high sign consists
of standing up and screaming,
"Dear, when can we go home?"
* * *
ACCORDING TO authorities on

the subject, the secret is in fast
timing.
A good guest never makes ex-
cuses, since a legitimate excuse
makes a host feel unimportant,
and a weak one leaves him
standing at the door babbling
inanely.
Once the guest has said good-
bye, he is not to bring up any
new topics of conversation. This
may niean leaving the hostess
with a spider crawling up her
back, but none the less, an ideal
guest will save his conversation
for the next time.
ANOTHER NOTED authority
has set definite times for leaving
specific gatherings.
Two and one half hours is the
longest period of time that
guests should remain for a par-
ty, and this length is the ex-
ception rather than the rule.
Consequently, if the hostess sees
a guest get up and leave in the
middle of a sentence, she is not
to be indignant, but should realize
that he is only abiding by the
latest rules of etiquette.
We are living in an ever-chang-
ing society.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

LAW MEDICAL
PUBLIC HEALTH

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1216 South University

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$6 95

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----------

17 Nickels Arcade

1
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APPETIZING, ECONOMICAL
MAN-SIZED MEAL
EVERY NOON'
COMPLETE
LUNCH . . 3
EVERY NIGHT
COMPLETE
DINNER . c

OUTDOOR ART CLASS
PAINTING - DRAWING
FOR BEGINNERS
6 weeks-$12. . . Sat. 10-12
Ph. 3-0425 - B. Enfield

I

BELLE-SHARMEERS

Regularly 1.50 to 1.95

1.30 to 1.65

SAVE during this one-week-only selling of famous Belle-Sarmeer nylons,
your favorite leg-sized hosiery. Take advantage of this unique opportunity
to stock up on your summer and fall nylon wardrobe. There's Gay Touch,
Cool Beige, Seofoam, Neutrone, Bayou and Tower Taupe, all flattering shades
for now and later. You'll want to buy them by the box for greater value
for yourself; for gifts, too.
11

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