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July 08, 1950 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-07-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DATLY

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[ERFIELD

MOTHERS SCORN ABSTRACT ART:
Visitors Favor Realism at Rackham Exhibit

*: * *

* * *

* * *

By NANCY BYLAN
A trail of cocked heads, out-
stretched forefingers and much
whispered comment has been pass-
ing through the Rackham galler-
ies this month.
These things belong to and ema-
nate from the many spectators
who come to view the exhibit on
postwar American painting, being
presented through July in con-
junction with the course in con-
temporary arts and society.
MOST OF the exhibit-goers
showed a marked preference for
the security of the West Gallery
where hang the realistic paintings,
over the uncomfortably unfamiliar
abstractions of the East Gallery.
Prof. Frederick Wight of the
fine arts department, who ar-
ranged the exhibit, explained
t h a t recognition has always
comforted people, but warned
that the realistic paintings
mustn't be considered obnserva-
tivb just becaese they're less ab-
stract.
Prof. Wight was impressed with
the wide acceptance of modern
painting in the midwest as con-
trasted with the attitude in the
heart of New England, where he
is associate director of Boston's
Institute of Contemporary Art.
BUT, HE ADMITTED, "I have
been associating primarily with
people working in the arts and
perhaps have missed the average
reaction of the non-artistic gal-
lery-goer."
And some of those attending
the exhibit have only one solu-
tion to the problem of abstract
paintings: "If you stand far
enough away you can figure it
out;" while mothers in the East
Gallery were quick with the in-
evitable comment, "Why, my
four-year-old daughter could do
better than this."
The color in the paintings, more
than anything else, called forth
comments of like and dislike.
"THAT'S BECAUSE color is the
most vivid impact a person has
with a painting,"' Prof. Wight ex-
plained. "In a good.painting, color
is an essential part.of the mood, of
what the painter is trying to say."
"Those who dislike the color-
ing in a painting most probably
dislike all of what they see in
the picture without realizing it,
and hit on color as the most ob-
vious characteristic."
One painting, called the "Bent
Arrow," received particular notice
from passers-by for' its resemb-
lance to a table mat.
* * *
PROF. WIGHT attributed this
to the pattei in the painting.
"Patterns which advanced artists,
have created are the very patterns

Prof. Wilson
Honored by
'Circulation'
"Circulation," the official jour-
nal of the American Heart Asso-
ciation, has dedicated its July is-
sue to Dr. Frank N. Wilson, pro-
fessor of internalmedicine at the
University Medical School, in re-
cognition of his approaching 60th
birthday.
Dr. Samuel A. Levine, a promi-
nent cardiologist in Boston, stated
that "few men in American medi-
cine have occupied such a unique
position as Dr. Wilson."
He has spent his life in academ-
ic research and his series of in-
vestigations, both experimental
and clinical, has been concerned
with one subject, electrocardio-
graphy. In addition, Dr. Wilson
developed the method now widely
used in examinations of the elec-
trical activity occurring in the
heart, Dr. Levine said.
Receiving a medical degree from
the University in 1913, Wilson
started his work in the then new
field of electrocardiography. He
served as an assistant in internal
medicine at the University from
1913-14, and as an instructor
from 1914-16.
Wilson's investigations, both ex-
perimental and clinical, now form
the basis for the diagnosis of an
impaired blood supply to the
heart, Levine added.

'BENT ARROW'-NOT A TABLE MAT BUT A PAINTING IN THE RACKHAM GALLERIES

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read The Daily Clussifieds

which have invaded the field of
design," he observed.
The order of placing the paint-
ings at the exhibit was determined
deliberately for such reasons as
size and schools of painting to
which the artist belongs, Prof.
Wight said.
He denied the speculation of one
exhibit-goer that there was an
ulterior motive of irony in hang-
ing a work called "Aid to Diges-
tion" next to a painting of a de-
caying female corpse.
U' Receives
Cancer Grant
The National Cancer Institute
has given grants totalling $13,692
to three University medical spec-
ialists for research in the continu-
ing fight on detection, control, and
care of cancer.
Albert .H. Wheeler, research as-
sociate in the serology laboratory
in the Medical School, will get $4,-
692 to study the disease of ana-
phylaxis.
Prof. Burton L. Baker and Prof.
Wayne L. Whitaker of the medical
school, will continue research on
the "relationship of the adrenal
cortex to the inhibition o f
growth."
Patten To Speak at
AnatomyCongress
Dr. Bradley M. Patten, Chair-
man of the Department of Ana-
tomy, will present a paper entitled
"The Beat Propagation and Val-
vular Action in the Embryonic
Heart", at the International Ana-
tomical Congress to be held July
24-28 in Oxford, England.
Three Economic
Awards Granted
The economics department has
announced that three awards have
been granted to students in eco-
iomics.
The awards are two $250 schol-
arships and the Harold D. Oster-
weil Prize in Economics.
The $250 awards, the Sims Sen-
ior Honor Scholarship, a gift of
Ernest M. and Natalie C. Sims of
Elkhart, Ind., has been jointly
presented to Carl A. Pohly of Flint,
and Lawrence B. Krause of Wash-
ington, D.C.
The Osterweil Prize has been
awarded to Jack K. WiT'th of Bay
city.

Rcent-A-Bike
35c Hour
$1.50 All Day
Weekly and Monthly Rates
Campus Bike & UOHbby Shop

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514 East Williams

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SUMER

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SALE MONDAY

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Av.
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Harper Maybee, Director of Music
Mary Lown, Organist
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon's ser-
mon topic "How Does God Guide Us?"
5:30 P.M.: Summer Vespers in the Social Hall.
Mr. A. K. Stevens will speak on "What the
Bomb is Doing Now to Our World." Buffet
supper is served at 6:30 p.m.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 5560
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Rev. Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
9:30 A.M.: Bible Study. Colossians- 2.
10:30 A.M.: Holy Communion Service, with.
sermon by the pastor, "Voluntary Service."
2:00 P.M.: Leave on outing to Cranbrook and
picnic supper. Phone 5560 Saturday for re-
servations.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 WashtenawAvenue-Phone 2-0085
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship. Sermon by
Rev. Edward H. Redman on: "Where We
Stand in Relation to Protestantism.
Coffee Hour after Services.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-Sacrament.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 AM.: Primary Sunday School during the
Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Services.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily, except Sundays and
holidays, from 11:30 A.M. to 5 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
National Lutheran Council
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.:' Worship Services in Zion and Trin-
ity Churches. (Communion at Zion Church).
4:00 P.M.: Meet at the Center and leave from
there for an outdoor meeting at the Graf
Cottage, North Lake.
Tuesday, 7:30 P.M.: Discussion Group at the
Center.
Wednesday, 4:00 P.M.: Tea and Coffee Hour
at the Center.

DIAG, ENGINE ARCH, UNION, LEAGUE,
FOLLETT'S, WAHR'S, SLATER'S

ULRICH'S, OVERBECK'S

5.0c

FRATERNITY "
JEWELRY_
O SOUVENIRS - GIFTS
O TRADITIONAL MUGS j
0 DIAMONDS WATCHES
O CUPS - TROPHIES
"L.G. BALFOURC
(1319 S. Universityv
"Home of the
Official Michigan Ring" .
Summer Hours, ten till five;
closed Saturdays.
TEACH ERS
WANTED
for
Mich., Calif., Others
KINDERGARTEN
ELEMENTARY
SPECIAL EDUCATION
IN RINVCI DD PAI S

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Joe A. Porter, Ministers
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "Thou Art That Man"
Dr. Dwight S. Large, preaching.
5:30'P.M.: Student Supper and Social Hour.
6:30 P.M.: Vespers, "Christianity at Work
India," Arthur Howard, speaker.
Welcome to Weslv Foundationn-Oen rl,

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by
Student Breakfast, Canterbury House. Reser-
vations, 2-4097 or 3-1135).
11:00 A.M.: Summer Church School (thru 3rd
grade).
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the
Rev. Henry Lewis, S.T.D.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship, Canter-
l-. u .

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