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July 07, 1950 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEE M10116AS DXIL

FRIDAY, YMT 7, 1950

TH1~ tIUCITIGAN )ATLY
__________________________________________________________________ U ___________________________ I

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Museum
To Feature
Mammalia
The University Museum will pre-
sent a program, "Mammalian Sur-
vival," from 7 to 9 p.m. today.
The competition of mammals in
nature will be illustrated by var-
ious groups. The principal mam-
malian food of the carnivorous
mammals on exhibit and the ene-
mies of carnivorous and herbivor-
)us mammals will be listed in the
program to be given visitors.
* *
"SOME LIME mammals native
to Michigan, such as the black
bear, bobcat, striped skunk,, rac-
coon and badger, can be seen in
the vivarium back of the Museums
Building," said Prof. Lewis Kel-
lum, Museum director.
"Few animals die a natural
death. When they become old and
unable to protect themselves most
mammals fall prey to their ene-
mies. Only the fit survive," con-
cluded Prof. Kellum.
* 4' *
THE PROGRAM will include a
motion-picture entitled, "Realm of
the Wild," to be shown at 7:30
p.m. in the Kelfogg Auditorium.
Kaiser Auto Strike
Idles 10,000 Men
Nearly 10,000 Kaiser - Frazer
Corp. employees are out of work
this morning.
As of 7 a.m. all production lines
were down owing to a supplier
strike in Muncie, Ind. Employees
in the Muncie plant have been on
strike for a week. k
A Kaiser-Frazer spokesman said
that the lay-off would last for an
indefinite period.

1IDt3~ ~1

LONG-HAIR CHAMPS:
Maestro Toscanini Wins
Music Award 7th Time'

LOVE PUTS WIFE IN HOSPITAL
ATLANTA - (RP) - An Atlan-
ta housewife was in a hospital
yesterday the victim of her hus-
band's love.
Returning home from work
Wednesday afternoon, the hus-

band found his wife sitting in a
chair. Sentimentally, he sat on
her lap to kiss her.
But, suddenly-shap, crackle.
The 116-pound wife was taken
to Grady Hospital with a broken
leg.

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1

Arturo Toscanini, NBC Sym-
phony orchestra maestro, has won
the top award for a regular con-
ductor of a national music maga-
zine for the seventh consecutive
year.
Jascha Heifitz received the,
award by the magazine for the

f'

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JASCHA HEIFITZ
. ..Best Fiddler
.* * *
best violinist of the year, for the
fifth consecutive year.
And other awards made by the
magazine indicate that contem-
porary serious music and sum-
mer festivals are highest in the
minds of 700 music critics queried
in the poll.
* * *
VOTING WAS heavily in favor
of hearing more contemporary
music on our American radio net-
works, and the New York Phil-

harmonic-Symphony was named
the orchestra which most con-
sistently favored this music type.
The Berkshire music festival,
directed by Serge Kousevitsky
and featuring the Boston Sym-
phony, was the favorite warm-
weather program.
Toscanini's NBC orchestra hit
the blue-ribbon class for the first
time in the poll as the best or-
chestra.
Two individual singers won first
place for the first time: Blanche
Thebom and Jussi Bjoerling, both
of the Metropolitan Opera Co.
SOME OF THE outstanding
winners cited by the critics, from
all over the United States, were:
NBC, for serving most faithful-
ly the cause of serious music dur-
ing the year.
Verdi's Falstaff, conducted by
Toscanini, as the outstanding
event of the year.
Three-way tie for the outstand-
ing opera-broadcast of the year,
between Strauss' Der Rosenkava-
lier, Mozart's Le Nozze di Figaro
and Moussorgsky's Khovanchina.
Bernstein's The Age of Anxiety
and Sessions' Symphony No. 5 tied
for outstanding new work.
Bruno Walter, guest conductor.
Fritz Reiner, opera conductor,
second consecutive time.
Arthur Fiedler, program direc-
tor, second consecutive time.
Artur Rubestein, pianist.
Robert Shaw's Chorale, best vo-
cal ensemble, fourth time.
NBC String Quartet, best in-
strumental ensemble.
James Facet's New York Phil-
harmonic-Symphony Intermission
discussions and interviews, best
script material.
Critics found TV a little too ex-
perimental to go overboard for it,
but awarded a few citations to
'Carmen and La Traviata on CBS
and Down in the Valley and Ma-
dame Butterfly on NBC.
TYPEWRITERS
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED
G.I. Requisitions
Accepted on Supplies Only

Board of Regents Promote
103 Faculty Members

'I

'T T 7 7 7 7T' °a7 7 s 777 7Fs,7 T wT 3 ;w'IF 77 ' Y ~ '

(Continued from Page 1)
EDUCATION SCHOOL: John
M. Trytten (business education),
Fred G. Walcott (education).
LAW . SCHOOL: Charles W.
Joiner, Allan F. Smith, L. Hart
Wright:
DENTAL SCHOOL: Dr., Russell
C. MacKenzie, Dr. William R.
Mann.
MUSIC SCHOOL: Benning W.
Dexter (piano).
PUBLIC HEALTH SCHOOL :
Adelia M. Beeuwkes (public health
nutrition).
Assistant Professor
LITERARY COLLEGE: Adelaide
A. Adams (fine arts), Gerald S.
Brown (history), Donald A. Darl-
ing (mathematics), Marvin L. Fel-
heim (English), Hirsch Hootkins
(spanish), William J. LeVeque
(mathematics), Harold M. Levin-
son (economics), Wilbert J. Mc-
Keachie (psychology), James C.
O'Neill (French), Peter A. Ostafin
(sociology), James H. Robertson
(English), Daniel B. Suits (econ-
omics), Wyman R. Vaughan
(chemistry), Robert E. Ward (po-
litical science) and Paul A. Wright
(zoology).
ENGINEERING C O L L E G E:
Jack Cline (electrical), Donald N.
Frey (chemical and metallurgical),
Henry J. Gomberg (electrical),
Wilfred M. Senseman (English),
Frank W. Sowa (metal process-
ing).
MEDICAL SCHOOL: Dr. Robert
E. Berry (surgery), Dr. Winthrop
N. Davey (internal medicine),, Dr.
Marion S. DeWeese (surgery), Ed-
ward W. Lauer (anatomy), Dr.
William J. Morrow (pediatrics and
communicable diseases), Dr. Syl-
vester J. O'Connor (surgery), Dr.
Ward M. O'Donnell (pathology),
Dr. J. Joseph Quilligan, Jr., (pe-
diatrics and communicable diseas-
es), Dr. Herbert E. Sloan, Jr., (sur-
gery), Dr. Martha R. Westerberg
(neurology).
EDUCATION SCHOOL: Edward
J. Furst (educational psychology),
Robert L. Brackenbury.
/4 T the.

DENTAL SCHOOL: Dr.BHeinz
0. Beck, Dr. William* E. Brown,
Jr., Dr. Leon Segat.
PUBLIC HEALTH SCHOOL:
Weston W. Ackermann (epidemi-
ology), Martin Hanig, (epidemi-
ology), Dr. J. Joseph Quilligan,
Jr. (epidemiology).
NURSING 'SCHOOL: Edith G.
Morgan.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION-Mar-
ie D. Hartwig (women), Howard
C. Leibee (men) and Earl N. Ris-
key. These ranks are, equivalent to
that of an associate professor.
Fritzie E. Gareis (women). As-
sociate director, equivalent to as-
sistant professor.

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