100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 05, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-07-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIE MICHIGAN ATTY

-WEDNESDAY, lJULY 5, 1950

i tiiila i. VLL1 {) 1VVV

r;

RACKHAM EXHIBIT DRAWS COMMENT:

Skeptics, Admirers View Contemporary Art

Vets Disgusted, Overjoyed at
Omnipresence Personified

* * *

* * *

* *

* *

By NANCY BYLAN
What does the average man-in-
the-gallery think of contemporary
visual art?
He agrees, that like the tele-
phone, it's here to stay, but his
wife is a little wary of putting in
her library a chair with a seat ap-
parently made out of shoelaces.
* * *
THE CURRENT display of con-
temporary visual art at the Rack-
ham galleries, however, assures
the exhibit-goer that he is de-
cidedly a part of the new move-
ment in art, and to prove it, offers
examples at their functional best.
The exhibit, which will run
until the end of July, is spon-
sored by the architecture col-
lege and was assembled by Prof.
Emil Weddige. Beginning with a
sampling of old-fashioned art,
it runs through a series of in-
formative posters on design,
which include everything from
a statue of Queen Hatsheput
(Egypt, c. 1499 B.C.) to a Frank
Lloyd Wright creaiion (Califor-
nia, 1937).
The display then merges into
actual examples of contemporary
visual art - paintings, sculpture,
ceramics, dishware and china,
industrial design, house design,
interior decorating, landscaping,
civic planning, and even the mo-
del of a Methodist church.
ESPECIALLY noteworthy is the
model of a new type of school
building - Unistrut - developed
by a University research project
and soon to be erected in Pitts-
field village.
- Astonished, admiration was
registered by most of the many
people who filed, singly and by
families, through the exhibit.
Particula, oo's and ah's were
east at the three model rooms
which constitute the major at-
traction of the display.
A common tendency among the
women at the exhibit was to fin-
ger the drapery material skepti-
cally, while the men eyed the
furniture with distrust.
"THE LEGS of that chair don't
look as if they'd hold me," one
portly gentlemen remarked.
It was generally agreed, how-
ever, that despite the odd curva-
tures of the chairs, the furni-
ture did look comfortable, and
many wives boasted, "Oh, look,
dear, WE have one of those."
The real significance of the vi-
sual arts exhibit was summed up
by one woman as she and her
husband departed.
"It gives me ideas," she said.

By BARNES CONNABLE
This week with the war news
from Korea came word of a war-
time phenomenon familiar to all
servicemen and veterans.
The peripatetic little man with
the long nose had returned. Kilroy
was back.
* * , ,
REACTION of campus veterans
ranged from apparent disgust to
complete indifference.
"It's nauseating," commented
vet Dave Burnell, Grad. '49. "I
never liked Kilroy 'and I never
will. I'd forgotten all about him.
He reminds me of the army and
all that sort of thing," he added.
Burnell stated that he had "be-
rated Kilroy roundly and soundly
on several occasions." When quer-
ied about overseas experience with

the omnipresent wall-climber, he
said that he could remember no
Kilroy signs that were repeatable.
* * *
"SO WHAT?" replied Malcolm
Raphael, Grad. '49, when confront-
ed with the tidings of Kilroy's
presence in the Orient.
"The news is too insignificant
to warrant my comment," Ra-
phael said. He added that he never
heard of Kilroy until he returned
from the navy.
Only favorable reaction to the
news was exhibited by Bradford
Shellsworthy Brown, Grad.: "I
cannot express my deep joy at
hearing the announcement that
Kilroy is back. Just like General
MacArthur, he has returned. To-
night I shall drink a glass of green
beer in hysterical celebration."

Faculty To Study
TruckingRules
Two University faculty members
have been named to a special
commission which will seek ways
of tightening state regulations cov-
ering trucks and other common
carriers.
Gov. G. Mennen Williams ap-
pointed as chairman of the com-
mission Prof. Paul G. Kauper of
the Law School. A member of the
commission will be John S. Wor-
ley, emeritus professor of trans-
portation engineering.
In announcing the commission,
Governor Williams said there are
"too many reports of chiseling and
violations of weight and safety
restrictions by a small percentage
of trucking operators." It is evi-
dent, he said, that present regula-
tions are inadequate.
Read Daily Classifieds

!i

CLUB211?
MANY STUDENTS have yet to realize the profit to be
gained by joining J. D. Miller's CLUB 211, merely be-
cause they don't realize how simple it is to become a
member.
When you buy your FIRST Meal Ticket you become a
211 Member and, as such, immediately lay claim to
these savings:
FOOD - appetizing, man-sized meals ... $1.50 a day
LAUNDRY - 5% below standard rates
DRY CLEANING - 25% reduction
SHOE REPAIRING - Soles and heels ... $1.98

MODEL ROOMS-Not of the future but of today are these examples of interior decorating featured at the current Contemporary Vis-
ual Arts exhibit at the Rackham Galleries. Scheduled, to run through July, the display has already attracted much attention, and a
steady stream of visitors passes through every day, making many revealing comments.
* * * * * 4 *

Rannells Opens Arts, Society Course

By WENDY OWEN
The first lecture in the Con-
temporary Arts and Society course
soared into the realm of space and
form in painting under the guid-
ance of Prof. Edward W. Rannells,
chairman of the department of
art at the University of Kentucky.
"The artist of today cannot work
creatively in the tidy limits of
the classic model," he declared,
"but projects his everyday experi-
ences of the new, mobile space in-
to his work, and thus comes closer
to the essential reality of the
world than the experimental phy-
sicist."
HE PROJECTED a simple re-
presentation of three buildings on
the screen, to use as a classic mo-

RED TANKS, COURTS:
Weary South Koreans
Have Two Main Fears

del, and described the symmetry
and mechanical use of perspective
which the artist had used to cre-
ate his representation. "But this,"1
he continued, "was rendered use-
less and unprofitable by the in-
troduction of the camera."
Thus the artist was forced to
go farther afield. With such
masters as Cezanne, Picasso and
the cubists the 'new art' began
to take shape, he continued.
Art is an expression of man's ex-
perience, and has often been called
the best commentary on our time.
Also, he added, art mirrors the
spectator, not life.
* , *
THUS IN AN AGE where sci-
ence was learningathat the classic
ideas of matter and time would
have to be made over, artists were
finding new forms, related to the
new conception of the world. Ce-
zanne built his paintings on color
planes which were identified with
the form they depicted and with
their place space.
But the space remained in
perspective, as in the classic
model.
The cubists removed this vestige
of classicism when they broke ob-
jects down into prismatic, some-
times transparent shapes, with
surface faces resolved into series
of planes. They introduced fur-
ther simplification both of form
and color. Thus the space of their
paintings was very limited in
depth, but the subtle nuances of
shape were really able to come,
Prof. Rannells pointed out.
* * *
ART THEN, can be considered
a language sign, rather than of
the emotions. It must be experi-
enced empathically. In painting,
he said, the form must be a lan-

guage of gesture and movement
which the spectator can see and
feel.
To be right, or to conform
aesthetically with the spectator,
these movements must be the
gestures and movements of the
body, Prof. Rannells emphasized,
in the some way that a viewer
feels the 'rightness' of a rect-
angle made according to the
golden rule of proportion.
Modern art is composed of new
forms which project a new world.
The pace of the form-givers may
have been too fast for its specta-
tors, but there is no cause for des-
pair, he concluded.

BusAd Faculty j
Balance' Books
Practical businessmen got a
lesson on how to show a profit
from the "theoretical" professors
at the University business admin-
istration school.
At the beginning of last se-
mester, faculty members of the
school bought themselves a toffee
pot and chipped in a set sum each
to buy coffee, cream and sugar
Last week they audited the books.
The "balance" sheet shows: In-
come, 37.20; Expenses, all paid,
$49.36. Loss, $12.16? Not at all.
Balance on hand is $3.62.

211 South State Street

Phone 2-8315

er Cafeteria

MART WALKER'S
BIG 4th of JULY

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Establishment in
Seoul of people's courts -- first taste
of terror for Communist "liberated"
areas - and weary hopelessnessof
South Koreans on the last night
they held all the Han River line are
reported vividly in this delayed dis-
patch which arrived in Tokyo.)
By TOM LAMBERT
ALONG HAN RIVER DEFENSE
LINE OUTSIDE SEOUL, June 29
- (Delayed) -- (A') - The poorly-
equipped, badly battered South
Korean defenders have two fears
tonight - Russian-made tanks
and the Red's people's court in
Seoul.
They had nothing with which
to stop the tanks. There was no-
thing they could do about the
North Korean's people's court, al-
though many of the men - es-
pecially the officers - knew that
their families were trapped in the
Communist-held city.
GENERAL Yu Jae Heung, 29
years old, a graduate of the Japa-
nese military academy, had his
headquarters in a hospital's dental
office. It was still equipped with
chairs, drills, overhead light fix-
tures and medicines.
Heung, whose wife and two
children are in Seoul said South
Koreans who have crossed the
Han the past two days told him
Coammunist invaders already
have started "people's courts."
The courts, he added, have gi-
ven "priority" on trials to families
of South Korean officers, police,
upper grade South Korean Gov-
rnment officials and supporters.
He said the South Koreans have
lost all their artillery and much
equipment to the enemy.
HE ESTIMATED that three-
fourths of the Southern force, ap-
proximately 900,000 troops, are on
fhp Smith Ride of the 1Hn.This

none. Enemy have long artillery
- our 105's too short."
We asked Lee if American troops
would help. His face lit up and
he said:
"Just let me have one platoon
-eto show to my soldiers. My
men's morale now like this -
(he dropped his hand toward the
floor) - would go like this" (He
whipped his hand over his head.)
But before the Southern de-
fenders can start a northern of-
fensive, said the Korean General,
his troops must have airpower,
tanks, heavy artillery and engi-
neers.

9 COATS
Originally to $29.95
$9-$11 -$15

Zllatcti sandi

5 4 4
Better Dresses
Originally to $29.95
$11 -$13 =$15

Marti Walker's
SALE POLICY
1-There will be a store-wide event
of money-saving special purchases
and clearances.
2-The prices quoted represent
substantial reductions and thus in-
sure real savings to help you keep
down the high-cost-of-living.
3-All Marti Walker's sale items
must measure up to high standards
of quality.
4-In addition to items advertised
for our sale, you'll find many un-
advertised items on sale under
Marti Walker's sale signs.
6 FORMALS
Formerly $29.95 $13
SUN BRAS
and PLA BRAS

100
Cotton Dresses
Va ues to $16.95
m $7 -
BLOUSES'
58 Cottons - Values to $5.95
$1.90-$2.90-$3.90
49 Others - Values to $8.95
$2.90--$3 .90-$4.90
100
Cotton Skirits
$2.90
61-Values to $8.95 $39
3-l195 $390
39-Values to $ 10.95 *4,9

Originally $3.50-Now
Originally $4.98--Now

$2 30
$340

TERRYCLOTH

TAILORED
Cotton Shirts

Beach Robes

Formerly
Formerly

$2.50-Now
$2.25-Now-

$150
$125

BOAR LEATHER
CORDOVAN LEATHER
KANGAROO LEATHER
SNAKE LEATHER
ALLIGATOR LEATHER
CALF LEATHER
SEAL LEATHER
PIG LEATHER
WALRUS LEATHER
LIZARD LEATHER

GOLD AND SILVER
LINK BANDS
MESH BANDS
WOVEN BANDS
SLIP OVER BANDS
EXPANSION BANDS
STAINLESS STEEL
SLIPOVER BANDS
NYLON BANDS
KOROSEAL BANDS

DENIMS

11 SUITS
Originally to $55
$22

SKIRTS
$6.98 Values
$3.90
SKIRTS
$3.98 Values
$2.90
SHORTS
$2.98 Values
$1.90

JACKETS
$7.98 Values
$4.90
JACKETS
$5.98 Values
$3.90
Pedal Pushers
$3.50 Values
$x.30

GOAT LEATHER

I

11. AIt mml

Narrow, Wide and Extra Long
IIDICI CD 'II F II r1 uA r3 r~ P*VII

Were $1.95, Now

98c

I

I

II

I II1-C ®1CI I IE I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan