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August 11, 1950 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

41

TSHE MICHIGAN DTILY

Junior Edition
Derby Drivers
Ready To Roll
AKRON, O.-- (A) --Soap Box
Derby drivers-the boys who scoot
downhill in low-slung, gravity rac-
ers-were arriving yesterday for
Sunday's national championship
run at Derby Downs.
The 147 youngsters - each a
hometown champion - will com-
pete for a four-year college schol-
rship in Sunday's 13th annual
-All-American Soap Box Derby.
The lads poured in by plane,
train, bus, auto-yes, and even by
taxicab. A cab brought 14-year-old
Robert Reedy from his front door
In Terre Haute, Ind., a courtesy of
the cab company.
Another champion, Gerald E.
Taylor, 12 years old, came parka-
tlad from Juneau, Alaska, where
his dad serves in the Coast Guard.
Read Daily Classifieds

'OMNIPRESENT SOLDIERY':
Yugoslav Trieste Filled
With Unreasoning Fear

Spotlight Review Aired on 'WMDS'

FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 1950
TO FOSTER RESEARCH:
Graduate SchoolGrants
Announced by Sawyer

By GEORGE S. FLINT
Special to The Daily
CAPIDISTRIA, Trieste - Here
in the Yugoslavian-administered
"B" zone of the Free Territory of
Trieste it is possible to penetrate
one of the few cracks in the Iron
Curtain.
Lying about 15 miles below the
bustling port of Trieste, this for-
merly Italian held city is the nom-
inal capital of a cluster of com-
munes on the shore of the Adria-
tio.
THOUGH THE Italain popula-
tion here far outnumbers the Sla-
vic, Yugoslav supervision gives the
area a profoundly different tem-
per from the northern portion of
the Free Territory, under Anglo-
American supervision.

Capidistria is crowded with
shops whose windows are nearly
empty; a town whose people nev-
er smile and who fear talking
to strangers; a town where sold-
iers seem far to outnumber civil-
ians, and where the shabby Par-
tisan uniform is a badge of rela-
tive prosperity.
The streets, once crowded with
peasants and townspeople on Sat-
urday afternoons, are virtually de-
serted. Most of the activity comes
from the omnipresent soldiery.
SQUADS MARCH up and down
the narrow streets, most of them
young boys from the surrounding
area who have "volunteered" for
military duty.
Walking in the beautiful old
village square, now called Piazza
della Marshal Tito, we saw peo-
ple staring disbelief at our lit-
tle group of American students
and teachers.
Life here is filled with unreason-
ing fear. We asked to buy post-
cards in a grubby little shop of the
square. The proprietor refused
Italian lire even though they aree
the legal currency for the Terri-
tory.
So it is with all the townspeople
-Communism for them means
force, deprivation and a life with-
out laughter.
Museum Presents
Films on Jungle
"Jungle Arts, Crafts, and Peo-
ple" is the subject of the Univer-
sity Museums' program today, il-
lustrated by moving pictures at
7:30 p.m. in Kellogg Auditorium.
Two films, "Malaya-Nomads of
the Jungle" and "Malaya Penin-
sula" will be shown. Exhibits of
South Pacific native objects are
features in the fourth floor corri-
dor of the Museums Building.
The Museums will be open Fri-
day night from 7 to 9 p.m.
01 OGoo
FRATERNITY
c JEWELRY 0
fJ SOUVENIRS - GIFTS
TRADITIONAL MUGS 0
DIAMONDS - WATCHES
CUPS --TROPHIES
L. G. BALFOUR CO. O
1319 S. University
o "Home of the U
Official Michigan Ring" c
Summer Hours, ten till five;
o closed Saturdays.
l:o<<--I=<--0O-

iology, for laboratory studies on
bacteria which cause undulant fe-
ver.
Dr. H. Marvin Pollard, asso-
ciate professor of internal medi-
cine, was given a $2,750 grant to
study the value of using ACTH
(the pituitary gland hormone)
to patients who suffer from se-
vere and prolonged inflamma-
tion of the large intestine.
Dr. James L. Wilson, chairman
of the pediatrics and coimuni-
cable diseases department and Dr.
Donald A. Sutherland received a
grant of $2,700. Doctors Ernest H.
Watson and George H. Lowrey,
of the same department, received
a grant of $2,100.
A PSYCHOLOGIST, Dr. Clyde
H. Coombs, was awarded a $2,440
grant. Dr. Ralph D. Rabinovitch
and Dr. Sara Dubo, psychiatrists
received $2,000.
In the dentistry school, Dr.
Floyd A. Peyton was given $2,-
000.
In the physical sciences, these
awards were made: Claude W.

(Continued from Page 1)

Hibbard, $600; Cyrus Levinthal,
$500; George Piranian, $500;
Christian S. Rondestvedt, Jr., $1,-
200; Peter A. S. Smith, $560; Er-
win C. Stumm, $500; and Brymer
Williams, $900.
Biological science grants were
made to these people: Francis C.
Evans, $1,100; Nelson G. Hairston,
$1,300; Robert J. Lowry, $500;
Alexander H. Smith, $1,500; Ro-
bert W. Storer, $1,300; and Wil-
liam R. Taylor, $1,600.
In language and literature,
Campbell Bonner received $150;
Lawrence B. Kiddle, $87; Robert
J. Niess, $50; Hereward T. Price,
$300; and Clarence D. Thorpe,
$150.
Social science awards were given
to these, people: Dwight L. Du-
mond, $1,500; Paul A. Hunsicker,
$150; Joseph E. Kallenbach, $610;
Elmer D. Mitchell, $1,200; and
Manfred C. Vernon, $740.
George H. Forsythe, Jr., received
a fine arts award of $389.
In the health sciences, awards
were given to: Russell N. DeJong
and Martha R. Westerberg, $760;
and Cameron Haight and W. Bur-
ford Davis, $1,075.

Daly-Bob Lewis
DEAR MILTON-An avid adlibber passing as an Indiana farmer explains the preposterous adventures
of his pig, Milton, before an audience of tired radioeers during the "Spotlight Review," one of the
many afternoon audience programs given yesterday on the speech department's "Operation 4006."
________________________________* * * *

V.

There is a Wonderful Selection of
qi t ?etneM6'*ah'fce4j
at HALLERS
COMPACTS
IDENTIFICATION BRACELETS 0
MICHIGAN JEWELRY
CIGARETTE LIGHTERS
KEY CHAINS '
0
JHALLERS JEWELERS
717 North University - Near Hill Auditorium
o - c--yo --yog--yOe--yoae--=>O<=.e-:O )->o<o,--

Great Lakes
Will Review
Deferme1nts
GREAT LAKES, Ill -(2)-A dis-
trict review board has been set up
at 'Great Lakes with power to
grant up to six months' deferment
to certain enlisted Navy Reservists.
Rear Admiral J. Cary Jones,
USN, Commandant of the Ninth
Naval District, announced forma-
tion of the board yesterday. It will
review requests for deferment of
Midwestern Naval Reserve offi-
cers and enlisted men, other than
members of the Naval Air Reserve,
who are recalled to active duty.
* * *
THE BOARD will be empowered
to grant up to six months' stay to
enlisted Reservists employed in
certain key industries, to college
students, and where community
health or safety would be jeopar-
dized by immediate recall.
Adm. Jones said no requests
for deferment should be sent in
before active duty orders are re-
ceived. He said the requests must
be initiated within 48 hours af-
ter receipt of orders, and should
be addressed to the Comman-
dant, Ninth Naval District, Great
Lakes, Ill.
Reservists employed in key in-
dustries should accompany their
deferment requests with a state-
ment by their employer accurately
lescribing the empioye's duties and
indicating why he is essential.
College students who require a
short time to complete a period of
higher education may be deferred
for a time, but there will be no
continuing deferment until gradu-
ation for all college students.

.Operation 4006' Brings
Chaos in Radio Studios

.4'__

"Operation "4006," a production
in radio mayhem, turned the
fourth floor of Angell Hall into
organized bedlam yesterday.
Designed to instruct students in
the day-to-day operation of a
radio station, the operation, nam-
ed after the studio number, cram-
med eight hours of regular broad-
casting into two periods about half
that long.
*' * *
SCRIPTS WERE from network
shows, commercials were student-
written, and all was designed to
give the feeling of continuous
broadcasting.
tWMDS was the Operation's sta-
tion call-letters, standing for Mi-
chigan Department of Speech.
Somee50 students enrolled in
the speech department ran hur-
National Guard
Units Leave
For Graylino
Washtenaw county's two Nation-
al Guard units-company K, 125th
Infantry Regiment from Ann Ar-
bor and Ypsilanti's 46th Signal
Company leave today for a two-
week training routine at Camp
Grayling.
Camp Grayling will be the hub
of the greatest concentration of
troops in Michigan history today
and tomorrow as more than 8,000
members of the National Guard
gather from all over the state for
their summer encampment.
* * *
COMPANY K will leave Ann Ar-
bor aboard a special troop train
from the Michigan Central station
at 11:30 p.m. today.
The Ypsilanti contingent heads
north via truck convoy about 5
o'clock tomorrow morning.
The Camp Grayling maneuvers
are scheduled to break up the
morning of Aug. 26.
DP Students To Be
Honored at Daince
An outdoor square dance will be
held at 8 p.m. today in the First
Methodist Church's parking lot
for the benefit of DP students at-
tending the University.
*-

riedly from studio to studio. In
one place they were acting on
"Portia Faces Life," then they
would be called to rehearse "Lit-
tle Orphan Annie.
After about an hour of this,
physical constitutions being what
they are, exhausted students would
crawl into the audience studio to
watch or join in on a show.
SEVERAL TYPES of broadcasts
were going on at about five min-
ute intervals. Soap operas tied in-
to news broadcasts, and were fol-
lowed by audience participation
shows.
One of these featured an In-
diana man with his small pork-
er, Milton, and a bumptious
songstress. who moaned through
a popular song for the benefit
of foot-weary "4006'ers."
Throughout all this chaos, the
figure of Prof. Garnet Garrison,
who was in charge could be seen
offering encouragement, question-
ing and generally checking up to
make sure that things went along
on schedule.
"After all this, the students
should have learned something,"
he reported.
PORTRAITS
and
GROUP
PHOTOGRAPHS
h amer &ubo
Phone 2-2072
208 Mich. Theatre Bldg.
4-A-A A-A-A-A-A-A- - A-A- 1 A - .- A - - - A

Z...
Wardrobe
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SQUARE
DANCE
TONIGHT at 8 P.M.
(Parking Lot of
First Methodist Church)
WAYNE KUHNS, Caller
Adm. 30c D.P. Fund Benefit

\ \\

FLORENCE CHADWICK
... breaks women's channel record

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START THE WEEKEND WITH A
WARDROBE OF CLEAN CLOTHES
THE LAUNDROMAT IS COMPLETELY
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