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August 09, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-08-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1950

Pens Another

Brown Cites
Problems
In Insurance
Sustaining incentives and pro-
viding for mobility of the labor
force are two of the biggest prob-
lems facing our social insurance
system, Dean J. Douglas Brown of
Princeton University told the final
session of the summer lecture ser-
ies on "The Quest for Social Se-
curity."
Social insurance is intended to
sustain incentive as an extension
of the wage system, making the
reward for effort not only current
income, but a greater assurance of
protection in time of unemploy-
ment, disability and old age,
Princeton's dean said.
* * *
THE SCALE OF social insurance
benefits should be graduated so
that there will be meaningful dif-
ferentials in rewards for differen-
ces in effort, the member of the
Federal Advisory Council on Social
Security asserted.
He said that Congress recog-
nized the great importance of
incentive in making current
changes in the social security
program.
Administration of social insur-
ances creates many problems that
vitally effect the mobility of la-
bor, Dean Brown added. Such
problems as whether to grant un-
employment benefits to seasonal
workers or whether married women
who work periodically are entitled
to benefits often are raised.
As to attitudes concerning social
insurance, Dean Brown declared
that the obligation to prevent dis-
tress is not reduced by ignoring it
or postponing planning until po-
litical pressures make sound plan-
ning. impossible.
TYPEWRITERS
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED
STUDENT SUPPLIES
G.I. Requisitions
Accepted on Supplies Only
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St. Ph. 7177
fountain pens repaired

ASSOCIATED PRESS

POCTURE

N EWS

LACE ON V.ELVET-
Inspired by Italian Renaissance,
Paris milliner Albuoy drapes
white lace over a Venetian black
velvet tricorne, fastening scarf
with a diamond clip,

A M E R I C A N D E B U T - The Volkswagen, popular-
priced German car, cruises on New York's Broadway after arri-
val in U. S. for exhibition at Chicago's International Trade Fair.

S O A P -TO W O OD C A R V I N C-Dale Elmer (left),
who began with soap sculpture, shows his wood carvings to artist
Robert Rishell at his exhibition in the Berkeley, Cal.;,Library.

-Daily-Bob Lewis
AUNT RUTH ... prolific correspondent
* * * *
)RLD WAR II 'VETERAN':
Ann Arborite Writes To
Service Men In Korea

By PAULA STRAWHECKER
"Aunt Ruth" Buchanan has 2,-
230 nieces and nephews.
This is the number of service
men and women to whom Mrs.
Buchanan, of 418 E. Washington
St., wrote during World War II;
all of them call her "Aunt Ruth."
* * *
AT THE BEGINNING of the
war, Aunt Ruth ,got the names of
local service men from the army
and navy departments in Ann Ar-
bor and planned to write to "just
a dozen or so", but more and
more found out about her through
friends, and soon she began re-
ceiving fifty and seventy-five let-
ters a day, answering them all
within 24 hours.
"It was a personal obligation;
the boys were defending me and
it was the only thing I could do
for them," she said yesterday.
On a desk in her sun porch is a
large index file with the names
and addresses of all of her cor-
respondences. She estimates that
between 1940 and 1946 she wrote
17,828 letters, wrapped and mailed
57,056 copies of The Daily and
sent over 6,000 birthday and
Christmas cards.
AUNT RUTH has turned her file
of letters and photographs over
to the Michigan historical depart-
ment in Rackham. As far as is
known, it is the largest collection
of personal letters ever assembled.
When Admiral Nimitz spoke
liere after the war, Aunt Ruth
wanted to meet -him. An aide
asked her name, and finding it
was not listed in his appoint-
ment book, told her, "You can't
speak to him, but you can look
at him."
Aunt Ruth waited patiently un-
til the procedure was repeated with
a second aide. This time she asked,
"Do you believe in magic?" When
urwitz To lie
Exchange Student'
Jacob Chanon Hurwitz of De-
troit has been selected as the Uni-
versity's exchange student to
Queens University, Belfast, Ire-
land, for 1950-51, Dean R. A. Saw-
yer of the graduate school has an-
nounced.
According to an arrangement
between the two universities, every
year one student is selected from
each university for a year's study
in the other.
Hurwitz, a graduate student,
will continue his study in the field
of economics. The Irish exchange
student has not yet been selected.
the skeptical a i d e answered,
"Well . . . ," sbe said, "You tell
Admiral Nimitz these magic words
r -.si t a ;-

and see what happens. Say 'Aunt
Ruth would like to see you.' "
AS SHE TELLS IT, the aide
came out of the office as if he
had been fired from a gun," and
she spent several hours talking
with the admiral, who, although
he had never met her, recognized
her name instantly.
Aunt Ruth is now writing to sev-
eral service men in Korea and will
be glad to write to any who would
like letters.
When asked how she found the
time to write so many letters, she
said, "I just wrote and wrote and
wrote, and that's all there was to!
it."

CHESAPEAKE BAY SPAN--Airviewshowssup-
ports for the four-mile. $44,000,000 bridge across Chesapeake Bay,
from Sandy Point to Matabeake. to be completed in 'June 1951.

Have you heard

about... the new

'-Zr.
'-+
/ f

R E M E M B E R I N G A RETORT DI S C O U R T E O U S - Passersby in Bastogne,
Belgium, inspect the monument, dedicated July 15, honoring U. S. Maj. Gen. Anthony C. McAuliffe,
who answered "nuts" to German demand he surrender his 101st Airborne Division in World War II.

7(-o

LTweed fragrance in a little
private glacier of your own
Glittering glasicicle pa!-200
lerned, golden copped.

9

P A M P E R E D !P E T- Gus, sole survivor of 37 goose eggs
incubated on Mason, Mich., farm of former Lieut. Gov. Vernon J.
Brown, of Michigan, watches Mr. Brown at work in study on farm.

Cool as crysfat and snowflakes. ..
fresh as the fragrance Tweed itself,
smooths over your skin.
Use lavishly and frequently... to your skin
it brings winter in summer. Goes where
you go... travels nicely and icily.

--------------------------------

T E S T F O R M 0 T 0 R C Y C L E - A rider hurdles three other motorcycles during a test
in the Bavarian Alps of a new type of motorcycle designed by Norbert Riedel, German engineer.

/n 3 absorheocyowizes
PROTECTS IN ANY COSTUME
Tampax cannot "show," even with
a play suit or sheer evening dres
Invented by a doctor-worn
internall Q uick chan ein e. t

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