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August 05, 1950 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-08-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. SATURDAY, AUGUST 5, 1950

__________________________ I

OIL & GAS COSTS:

Gliding Gives'U'Students
Unique Sport Up in Clouds

Gliding is a noiseless and less
pensive way to fly.
Ihose are the reasons for the
ently - organized University
aring Club, according to Bud
Alcombe, temporary president.
'IN CONTRAST to power flight,
erything is perfectly quiet, and
ere are no worries about bill for
soline and oil," he commented.
Purpose of the Soaring Club
to instruct student members
i the art of motorless flight,
aintain sailplanes, and parti-
tpate in midwest and national
ampetitions.
'Once you are up there, you
ye absolutely no sense of alti-
le or fear."
THE SPORT is a practical way
derive a great deal of enjoy-
nt at little expense, according
Holcombe.
The glider itself is constructed
asically like an airplane-min-
S° the motor. Made of light
ood, it has a very streamlined
iselage with long, slender
ings. However, the glider is not
Rilt for speed;, but for low
rag' and high 'lift'. Two pilots
Lay maneuver the small aero-
ehicle.
The glider is equipped with full
ght instruments, even with an
paratus for blind flying.
Differing from the airplane, the
der has but one wheel in the
ater of its body. It may be
inched either by a car or, for
kher altitudes, by a plane.
* * *
THE SAILPLANE glides at ex-
>tionally low speeds; ordinarily
o average speed is about 50 miles
r hour. With a favorable up-
uft, it will go about 100 miles
thout having to land. The rec-
d distance is 400 miles, and the
ord flight length is 52 rours.
Once up in the air, the pilot in
ontrol must be skilled in select-
ig up-drafts, which are essen-
.ally rapid risings of air caused
y heat. A sensitive instrument
-the . variometer-aids . him in
etecting any small change in
he rate of . climbing. This
hange denotes an up-draft, and
le pilot must guide his glider
TEACH ERS
WANTED
for
Mich., Calif., Others
Rural
Kindergarten
Elementary
Special Education
ElementarypPrincipals
and Supervisors
Home Economics
Many openings in Single Salary
Schedules ranging from $2700
to $4400. With large credits
for experience.
College - University
ALL Fields
Permits granted elementary
teachers without but near de-
grees in Education. Give photo,
phone, qualifications.
CLINE TEACHERS AGENCY
East Lansing, Mich.

towards the swirling air current.
Once within the up-draft, the
glider is tossed to a higher alti-
thde.
The weight of the in dividual is
not a consequential factor in soar-
ing, and neither is age. One of the
nation's top-flight soaring pilots is
65 years old and still participating
in competitive meets.
*, * *
SOARING IS a very safe sport,
since speed is not emphasized. It
is not likely that a crack-up would
injure any pilot who biuckled his
safety straps. Actually, the sport
has a very low record for acci-
dents, according to Holcombe.
Landing, however, is a prob-
lem, because the pilot is not al-
ways able to direct the course of
his glider, which may be thrown
one way or another by the ele-
ments. Fortunately, the glider
can be brought down in a small
area.
Glider competitions are judged
upon the basis of how long a pilot
can keep his glider up and how
close he can get to a predestined
goal. Each glider is launched at
different times. The Soaring Club
plans to participate in m~eets as
soon as its members have become
proficient in the sport.
THE CLUB just recently bought
a glider for its own use from a
former member of the 1941 "U,
Soaring Club.
Members of the club are fre-
quently encountering persons
who were formerly associated
with the club in the '30's, ac-
cording to Holcombe.
Other temporary officers of the
club are: secretary, Jim Clark;
and treasurer, Gerald White. The
faculty advisor is Harold F. Allen,
while credited with organizing the
club is' Dick Schulze.
Women's Group
Favors Rights, Pay
LONDON-(P)-T h e Interna-
tional Federation of Business and
Professional Women wound up its
fifth Congress with a resolution
reaffirming its belief in "the fun-
damental human rights of all peo-
ple everywhere."
Delegates from 20 nations., in-
cluding the United States, also
came out strongly in favor of
equal pay for women who do the
same jobs as men.
FRATERNITY
JEWELRY O
SOUVENIRS - GITS
TRADITIONAL MUGSO
DIAMONDS - WATCHES
CUPS - TROPHIES 0
o L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University
o "Home of the
Official Michigan Ring"Q
Summer Hours, ten till five;
o~y closed Saturdays.
. ct ooo o onocso

Pleated Cooler
Mandarin collar, sparkling sil-
ver and rhinestone buttons and
whirling, stitched pleat skirt.
Turn-back cuffed sleeves, nar-
row self belt and buckle . . . In
black master sheer. Sizes 1 4
to 44.
For this very moment .
and on through Fall, you'll
adore wearing these cool
darklings.
OTHER NYSILONS-The half silk-
half nylon wonder fabric. Easy to
wash-quick drying-wrinkle resist-
ant. The only dress you'll need for
your vacation travels. Beautiful Pure
Silk, too, at $19.95 and $25.00
RAYON SHEERS, crepes, tissue fail-r
les from $14.95
ADD SPICE to your wardrobe with a
new hat, bag, gloves, jewelry. Our
accessory department is brimming
over.

... MID-SEASON
DRESSES

Sizes
9-15,
10-44,
12-24 /2
Underneath you'll need
a dark slip. We've ray-
on tricot, satin, crepes.
From $2.95. Nylons
from $5.95. Sizes 32-
44. Half sizes.
Brassieres, too, of all
kinds . . . cotton, ray-
on, satin, and nylon.
From $1.50.

ALGAE OGGLERS-Students at the Biological Station, one of the University's eight summer camps,
peer at plant anatomy under the supervision of Prof. Carl LaRue of the botany department. Located
on Douglas Lake, near Cheboygan, Mich., the camp gives students an opportunity for field work in
botany and zoology not available in Ann Arbor.
UCm B an1 7 * * *
'U Camps Began in 187t4 - Casually

By NANCY BYLAN
When Prof. Joseph Baker Da-
vis and 24 civil engineering stu-
dents slipped away from Ann Ar-
bor in the summer of 1874 for a
four weeks surveying session at
Whitmore Lake, they didn't rea-
lize they were initiating something
new at the University - summer
camps.
Today there are eight summer
camps belonging to or affiliated
with the University, where stu-
dents can get credit in everything
from helminthology to socio-emo-
tional development of children.
CAMP DAVIS, now located at
Jackson Hole, Wyoming, was the
first of these developing out of
Prof. Davis -original excursion.
After. 16 - years on -the shore
of Lake Leelanaw, northwest of
Traverse City, Camp Davis, then
a part of the engineering col-
lege, moved to Glen Lake, and
four years later, in 1908 to Dou-
glas Lake, near Cheybogan.
Three years later Camp Davis
was transferred to its present lo-
cation.
Originally every civil engineer
who expected a degree from the
University had to spend a summer
at the camp. In 1938, however,
this engineering stronghold was
invaded by the geology depa't-
ment, which had formerly oper-
ated a camp at Mill Springs, Ky.
THE UNIVERSITY'S Biology
Station, affectionately known as
"Bug Camp" or "Ubs City," is
located between Douglas Lake and
Burt Lake, not far from the for-
mer site of Camp Davis, with
which it used to hold exchange
dinners.
The camp opened in 1909 with
13 students and two professors is
now a complete community of 141

b u i l d i n g s including Blissville,<
where the married couples live,I
Ladyville, where the unmarried
women reside, and State Street,<
the main thoroughfare.c
* * *
IN 1929 the forestry school1
jumped on the summer camp1
bandwagon and established Camp
Filibert Roth in the Hiawatha Na-i
tional Forest near Munising, Mich.1
Since 1935, however, forester'sI
have been learning their "saw
sense" on the shores of Golden1
Lake in Ottawa National Forestl
near Beechwood, Mich.]
Occasionally representatives of
axe companies give demonstrationsl
at the camp, including instruction
in how to shave with an axe. 1
Field work in geography is car-
ried on at the Geography Camp
in Wilderness Park near Macki-
naw City, a site chosen after the
geographers separated from a
joint camp with the geologists in
Kentucky. Field methods in ar-
chaeology are studied at Camp Kil-
larney in Ontario.
PERHAPS THE most famous of
all the University summer camps
is Interlochen, the National Mu-
sic Camp.
Founded in 1928, the camp
was originally intended as a
summer home for the National
High School Orchestra, but it
soon became a mecca for high
school and college musicians
from all parts of the country.
It affiliated with the University
in 1942..
Under the direction of Prof.
Joseph E. Maddy of the music
school, the camp offers Univer-
sity courses in music, art, theatre,
radio, dance, camp counseling and
recreational leadership.
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY has two
summer camps at which the stu-
dents, instead of being the "camp-
ers" are the "counselors." These
are the Fresh Air Camp, at Pat-
terson Lake near Pinckney, Mich.,
and Shady Trails, the speech im-
provement camp at Northport,
Mich.
The Fresh Air Camp for un-
derprivileged boys was founded
in 1910 by Lewis Reimann, for-
mer University football star and
Student Christian Association
worker.
Officially accepted by the Uni-
versity in 1944, the camp was
made part of the Institute for
Human Adjustment two years la-
ter.
University students act as sup-
ervisors at the camp, receiving
credit in education, sociology and
psychology courses.
* * *
SIMILAR WORK in speech cor-
rection is carried on by student
"counselors" at Shady Trails, a

camp for boys with speech de-
fects.
Founded in 1932 by John Clan-
cy, now assistant to the director
of the University Speech Clinic,
Shady Trails was given to the
University in 1949, as a gift from
the Kresge Company.
In addition to the regular sum-
mer camps, University units of
ROTC and NROTC hold summer
programs. ROTC seniors in drd-
nance attend a summer camp
training program at Aberdeen,
Md., those in infantry at Camp
McCoy, Wis., and those in the
signal corps at Ft. Monmouth,
N. J.
Cruises in the Atlantic are on
the summer program of NROTC
sophomores and seniors, while
juniors spend two weeks at Little
Creek, Virginia and then six
weeks at Pensacola.
Community
Theatre Plan
Success Told
(Continued from Page 1)

THERE'S STILL TIME to
shop for those wonderful
values in our 12 yearly
clearance of Dresses,
Suits, Accessories at 1/2
price and below.

f

x:>

1

Read and Use The Michigan Daily Classifieds!

erating within its budget,
showing a profit.

and

.1

"The theatre operates under the
city, which provides the buildings
and the maintenance," she said.
* * *
MISS EVANS commented that
there is a great civic interest in
the theatre and that organized
groups of parents of the children
in the younger theatre assert a
direct "political force" - getting
necessary improvements and ad-
ditions from the city.
The Cain Park Theatre pre-
sents four plays in an eight
week summer season, with a reg-
ular paid acting company sup-
plemented by local actors, high
school students, and university
apprentices.
"Our acting company is a non-
Equity group of professional qual-
ity, with talent drawn from the
greater Cleveland area," Miss
Evans declared.
* * *
"A POOL of extremely talented
persons has developed among ac-
tors, in the many little theatres
in Cleveland, who have found that
a rewarding theatrical career is
possible without going to New
York," she asserted.
"The Cain Park project has
made Cleveland community thea-
tre conscious by linking the city
and the theatre. We hope our suc-
cess will prove to other localities
that community theatrical centers
are practical and possible every-
where," Miss Evans commented.

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UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 5560
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Rev. Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
9:30 A.M.: Bible Study.
10:30 A.M.: Service, with Holy Communion. Ser-
mon by the pastor, "Assuming Responsibility
-A Christian Duty."
5:30 P.M.: Supper-Program of Gamma Delta,
Lutheran Student Club. Miss Leona Eisele will
lead a discussion of "Christianity Behind the
Iron Curtain."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Joe A. Porter, Ministers
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "Keeping Our Good Deeds
Good," Dr. Dwight S. Large, preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Student Supper and Social Hour.
6:30 P.M.: Vespers, "The Job of the Church,"-
Reverelnd Erland J. Wangdahl, speaker.
Welcome to the Wesley Foundation-Open Daily.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Av.
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Harper Maybee, Director of Music
Mary Lown, Organist
10:45 A.M.: Morning worship. Guest preacher,
the Rev. James Van Pernis whose topic will
be "Moments of Realization."
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
National Lutheran Council
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
9:10 A.M.@" Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Services in Zion and Trinity Churches.
4:00 P.M.: Meet at the Center for outdoor meet-
ing at the Hammett Cottage, Strawberry Lake.
Tuesday, 7:30 P.M.: Discussion Hour at the
Center.

I

EVERY DAY is 1
Chicken-in-the-Basket
VDAY v
Our Specialty at O
95c
ORDERS TO GO OUT
0 AT LAST.. .
RealBItaliae paghetti-60C
Beverage included

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by
Student Breakfast at Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Summer Church School (thru 3rd
grade only).
11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion. Sermon by the
PRv ,Herv I wis STD.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

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