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July 17, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


UNUAX, JU 7, TH MICIGAND
........... .THIE M9ICHIGAN DAILY

! ==WTW

rAGE

MAM'SELLE GUEST EDITOR:
'U' Coed Enjoys Big

..._._

Town Glamour

KEY TO CHRISTIANITY:
Pastor Emphasizes Study of History

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Miss Feldman;
a member of The Daily staff, is visit-
ing New York City this month as a
guest editor of Mademoiselle, na-
tional women's magazine.)
By PHOEBE FELDMAN
(Special to The Daily)
When the tall young English-
man from "Time" waltzed me
around the St. Regis' floor again
and enquired how long my time
for being "People" lasted, I real-
ized what being a Guest Editor
for "Mademoiselle" really meant.
I told him my time as a semi-
important person probably ran out
when my guest editorship did-
after, a month and asked to sit
down. He was an Englishman and
he waltzed like one-in concentric
circles. I was dizzy.
*~* *
AS, A MATTER OF FACT, my
somewhat unbalanced state prob-
ably came from something greater
than just the night and the music.
I would say that the previous
month of celebritizing,- picture
taking, glamourizing, and plain
and fancy galavanting might have
had something to do with it.
If you have never been to New
York, coming as a "Mademoi-
selle" Guest Editor is the way
to do it. Not only because that
way you come to the city tas
portation-free for a month and
receive a $150 salary plus rent
subsidy, but because as a "Mile."
guest editor you'll meet the New
York you probably expected to
meet.
And if you are a rare New
Yorker born and bred, you will
meet the part of New York that
you too have read about, but as an
average New Yorker, have never
lived in.
YOU WILL LIVE-for a month
--the world of People. For a
month, you will walk among the
great and near-great. And you
will be treated as a future mem-
ber of the Society. As a prospec-
tive member of the group-which
generally operates in perfect ac-
cord with Darwin-you will. be
treated with kindness and consid-
eration.
Doors will be opened for you.
You will be introduced to the

1$1

* *

, *

, * ,

By NANCY BYLAN
A vital interest in the history of

r

* * *

BACKSTAGE ON BROADWAY-Fay Kanin (left), author of the c irrent Broadway stage hit "Goodbye My Fancy," gets a good laugh
out of what Madelaine Carroll (center) is saying to Ruth Hus ;ey, while Mademoiselle guest editors Fran Jones, University of
Mexico and Phoebe Feldman, University of Michigan, look on. Mi:s Hussey has replaced Miss Carroll as the star of the play about
college life.

people you have wanted - per-
haps needed-to meet in your
field. If you are a novice actress,
and would like to work for Lon-
don's Old Vic, you will meet the
One to See about that.
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED in
merchandising, you will meet top
designers. And if, as in my own
case, you would like to work as a
drama critic, or on the New York-
er someday-you'll meet People
from the New Yorker, and you'll
meet a drama critic.
And while you are writing for
the magazine (Mlle.), or going
out into the garment center of
New York to get acquainted
with the merchandising market,
you will learn still more of the
world of "Work, Wine, and Dine

-All Together and All the
Time."
You will go to cocktail parties,
and meet Names, and find them
human beings. And the Names will
tell you that the best way to get
ahead is to go to other cocktail
parties, and meet other Names.
You will go to parties, and meet
the good looking collegiates from
the Ivy League.
* * *
YOU WILL be treated as some-
thing of a celebrity yourself.
You will grow accustomed to
popping flashbulbs-and regularly
doing your all for Pepsodent. As
something of a celebrity, you will
go to the places and things that
the People go to-the Stork Club;

* * *
the private advance screenings of
movies; the showings of haute cul-
ture fashions; the star's dressing
room backstage at the theatre.
You will even get to buy your fall
clothes wholesale-without benefit
of Sam-the Middle Man.
And though you will find that
this world of the cocktail and
the cigarette-holder is often as
false as its women's beautiful
eyelashes, if you don't want to
be a doctor, lawyer, or Indian
chief-you will probably like it.
Some of these people are just
trying too hard. You will come to
know that. Some of them take
themselves too seriously. Your
sense of humor will take care of

** *
that. (Caution: minus sense of
humor means most likely mad-
ness.)
* * *
BUT A LOT of them are just
plain bright; intelligent, creative,
talented and stimulating. And you
will probably like this kind of
people, and their way of life. And
you will decide after seeing for
yourself that theirs is the kind
of life you want to lead.
At least-I did.
A College Edition of Mademoi-
selle, done exclusively by*20 guest
editors picked from colleges and
universities from all over the Unit-
ed States, will appear throughout
the country sometime in August.

early Protestantism marks the
work of the Rev. Leonard Verduin,
pastor of the Students Evangelical
Chapel.
Believing that a knowledge of
history is second in importance
only to an understanding of the
Bible, Mr. Verduin feels that the
basic thrust of the faith has been
lost to modern life and can be
found only in a study of historic
Christianity.
MR. VERDUIN'S SPECIAL field
is the pre-Reformation in the
southern Netherlands. He has fre-
quently given lectures in the his-
tory department's course on the
Northern Renaissance.
The pastor is producing a
book on the early origin of the
Protestant movement. His fond-
est ambition is to spend six
months in the southern Nether-
lands completing his research.
He expects to realize that am-
bition next summer.
Born in Chicago, Mr. Verduin
lived on the Rosebud Indian Res-
ervation in South Dakota as a
young man. He spent one year in-
structing in a school there and
can still speak a little of theSioux
Indian language.
* * *
MR. VERDUIN received his the-
ological training at Calvin Sem-
inary and an AM in history from
the University. For 10 years he
served as minister of a church in
South Dakota, coming to Ann Ar-
bor in 1941 as the first resident
pastor of the Students Evangelical
Chapel.
Among Mr. Verduin's avoca-
tions, building ranks foremost.
He is constructing by himself a
country home of which he is
also the 'architect. He considers
that building takes the place of
golf in his life.
The minister is an accomplished
linguist in Dutch and German. He
also has a thorough knowledge of
Grad Onting Club
To Picnic Today
Members of the Graduate Out-
ing Club who have signed up for
the joint outing with the AVC will
meet at 2:15 p.m. today at the
northwest entrance of the Rack-
ham Building.
From there, the group will go
to Independence Lake for a base-
ball game, swimming, and a steak
roast.
At8 p.m. Tuesday the Outing
Club will hold its weekly square
dance in the Women's Athletic
Building.
CHICAGO-The giraffe, tallest
of all animals, owes a great por-
tion of its height to its extremely
long neck. However, according to
The World Book Encyclopedia, the
lowly mouse and theylofty giraffe
both have the same number of
neck bones-seven in all.

PASTOR-HISTORIAN-The Rev. Leonard Verduin, pastor of the
Students Evangelical Chapel, emphasizes the historical approach
to the study of Christianity in his work as minister and student
religious counselor.
* * * *

Greek, Latin and Hebrew and can
read French and Spanish.
* * *
HE RECENTLY translated into
English "The Complete Theolog-
ical Works of Menno Simons" for
the Mennonite Publishing House,
Scottsdale, Pa. The original work,
two volumes long, was written in
various 16th century Dutch dia-
lects.
Mr. Verduin's chief project as
pastor here has been his con-
stant efforts to get a new chapel.
His success resulted in the pres-
HAIR STYLES
for Women!!
They are shaped and feather-
edged to individual needs. Five
barbers are on our staff who
have had years of experience in
the art of cutting Ladies and
Children's hair. Your approval
is invited.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

ent chapel building, completed
only eight weeks ago.
Built to hold 265 people, the
chapel includes a $6,000 electronic
organ, paid for entirely by stu-
dents. At present, students are
raising money to buy pews.
Mr. Verduin contributed his tal-
ents to the building by putting in
the antique cathedral glass win-
dow panes.
In addition to a chapel, the new
building has a study and social
facilities in the basement.
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Sold,
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. E. Requisitions Accepted
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.

S

-"'"

""""""''"""".'

"",

Lectures, Social Functons
Offered by Religious Groups

BOOK SUGGESTIONS
for Summer Reading

M. STERN ....
P. BUCK.....
W. BEEBE. ....
YERBY .......
COZZENS
DAVIS ........
SINCLAIR .... .
HEYER .......
V. SHEEN . . . .
A. PEGIS.. . . .

Twilight of The Floods
Kinfolk
. High Jungle
Pride's Castle
.Guard of Honor
.Beulah Land
O Shepherd, Speak
. Arabella
. Lead Kindly Light
Wisdon of Catholicism

Student religious groups will
continue their summer programs
of lectures and social activities.
Gamma Delta, the Lutheran
Student Club, will hear a talk to-
night by Prof. Paul Saafpakk of
Upsala College, New Jersey.
Wesleyan Guild's program to-
night will include an address by
Dr. James Brett Kenna, director
of the guild, and pastor of the
First Methodist Church.
Prof. Howard Y. McClusky of
the education school will speak on
"Man's Inner World" to Westmin-
ster and Roger Williams Guilds to-
night.

Congregational-Disciples Guild
will spend the week recovering
from their Ice Cream Carnival.
However, guild members are not
too worn out to enjoy a picnic
supper at Barton Pond tonight.
Hillel will hold its weekly open
house tonight, and the Students
Evangelical Chapel its Sunday
evening social.
Canterbury Club members will
go picnicing tonight, as will the
Lutheran Student Association,
which plans a supper at North
Lake.

Concert To
Be Given
Paul Doktor, viola, and Benning
Dexter, piano, will present a con-
cert of chamber music at the reg-
ular meeting of Le Cercle Fran-
cais, 8 p.m. Thursday in the
League.
Doktor is a music school faculty
member and a member of the
Stanley String Quartet of the Uni-
versity. Dexter is a guest lecturer
at the Music School during the
summer session.
The program will consist of two
groups, the first featuring two
works,

s

J~cIciAora.

i

and many others
(Don't miss our Bargain Book Counter)
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 South University

L

Come
CANOEING
Tonight
on the Huron River

M
WI

EVERYONE IS WRITING HOME
ABOUT .. .
The Cifr h 1illn

is
,_. - .

-,q
a1 p ..
;,. y f t
E '{,.
_-
r

Just in time for you to have those little summer "extras" you've been wanting
at a fraction of their original cost!

Old Town Canoes for Rent
Open Daily-- 10 A.M .'til Midnight
CANOE LIVERY
Huron River at Longshore Drive - Phone 5004-
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!
TEMPLE CAFETERIA

1
"
*0

Group of DRESSES
Spun Linen * Cords
Cottons * Shantungs
originally to $16.95

i

SIZES 9 to 15
10 to 44, 1412 to 2412

$700

1 Group of DRESSES
* Sheers * Shantungs
" Crepes - Cottons
originally to $25

1
-0
0

Group of DRESSES
Pire Silk * Crepes
Sheers * Cottons
originally to $29.95

Evening and Dinner Gowns included

1
0
0

Group of DRESSES
Better Cottons
Shantungs " Crepes $1800
originally to $39.95

::,"..:: : re^

I Group of SUITS
Nationally famous -
regular $25.00 value
short and long sleeved

I Group of SUMMER SUITS

$1800

SIZES 9 to 15
10 to 44, 141/2 to 24V/
S UI T-

from our regular stock
Pastel and Dark Colors
originally to $19.95

$1495

1 Group of WASHABLE
SUITS - COTTONS

MASONIC TEMPLE

* 327 S. Fourth Ave.

Cords and Chambrays
Stripes and Solids
originally to $14.95

$1000

1 Group of SUITS
Famous Printzess
Cooltimers
originally to $29.95

$22 50

Now Under
MF\A/ kAAMA(F.AFMT

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