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July 13, 1949 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-13

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PAGE FOUR

'""HE MICHIGAN DAILY

r TWEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 1949

.D.. sia..1 STiAN-A itI.Vt11N ".tvljj 1
ry y m

A HELPING HAND:
Congregational Guild To
Sponsor D.P. Student Here

BabySitters Offer Bargain Rates
*p

Congregational-Disciples Guild
will soon join the ranks of cam-
pus organizations sponsoring Dis-
placed Students at the university.
Before the council of the guild
dissolved in the spring, it decided
to undertake the project, and
summer guild members are al-
ready working on plans to raise
money. Their first undertaking
will be an ice cream carnival to
be held Friday night on the corner
of State and Williams Streets.
Slosson Will
Lead Forum
Under. the leadership of Prof
Preston W. Slosson of the ihstory
department, local members of the
Michigan Committee to Defend
the Bill of Rights will hold a
luncheon meeting at 12:15 p.m.
today at the Union.
Prof. Emeritus John L. Brumm,
who was a delegate to last year's
lobby against the Mundt-Nixon
Bill, will review his first-hand
Washington experiences.
Miss Ruth Frank of Detroit,
Michigan representative for the
New York Bill of Rights Confer-
ence, will review the purposes of
the new conference and the im-
plications of the present Mundt
Bill.

THE GUILD COUNCIL hopes
to bring the student from Europe
in time to begin the 1950 spring
semester at the University, ac-
cording to Wym Price, guild mem-
ber'.
The council is viewing the
possibility of sponsoring some-
one from a house for displaced
students on the outskirts of
Paris. A correspondence group in
the house has been exchanging
letters with guild, members and
a number of mail friendships
have developed, Price explained.
There are already nine displaced
students on campus. Sponsoring
groups are Assembly, Pan-Hellenic
Association, Inter - Cooperative
Council, IFC, West Quad Council,
and SRA. These organizations pro-
vide for the students' room, board,
and general welfare, especially
clothes and books They also make
arrangements for the students to
secure part-time jobs.
Grats To Cavort
The Graduate Outing Club's
square dance for this week will be
held at 8 p.m. today at the Wom-
en's Athletic Building.
Contrary to a ^ previous an-
nouncement, it is expected that
next week's dance will be on Tues-
day.
These square dances are open to
everyone.

By NANCY BYLAN and
MARTHA BAZAR
Student baby sitters will handle
up to five children for 35 cents
an hour, despite the challenging
difficulties that attend their job.
In a Daily survey which polled
baby sitters registered with the
Office of the Dean of Women, this
low rate was found to be wholly
unconnected with practices of col'-
fusion. It is subject to a reduction
if the babies are asleep when the
sitter arrives.
ACCORDING TO survey results,
the most usual call for baby sitters
comes from young parents who
want to go to a movie or a party.
Local plays and concerts are also
assets to the baby sitting business.
Baby sitters are left with a
barrage of last minute instruc-
tions on whereabouts of par-
ents, pajamas and food. Other
instructions range from coke
consumption limitations to
hours at which baby must be
awakened to perform his na-
tural functions.
Parents gone, the baby sitter is
left in the hands of fate. In con-
templation of a quiet evening, she
is likely to begin her homework,
although current issues of mag-
azines may claim her initial at-
tention.
* * *
BEFORE LONG, however, duties
of the job beckon. A proficiency
in diapering is a must for all baby
sitters. A good sitter should also
be able to ooh and aah properly
over collections of dead snakes and
decapitated insects.,
The major difficulty of baby

M
4.-
-Daily-Bill Hampton
* * * *
sitting is putting the child to are satisfied with a desk and an
bed. This task is never com- ash tray, others give first prefer-
pleted for baby is perpetually ence to homes with televisions ets.
crying for fresh diapers, cookies, * * *
or a lullaby. In crises, baby may MOST OF THE student sitters
even bang his head against the have been in the business since'
wall, while the sitter frantically junior high school days. They are
tugs the bed to the middle of the called from one to four times a
floor. week. Usually parents call for the
The Daily survey revealed that same girl every time and fre-
most baby sitters favor on ice box quently give her name to their
open-door policy. They also enjoy neighbors. However, the survey
a free hand with the radio and showed the summer demand for
telephone. Although some sitters sitters to be particularly low.

WUOM
Carry T
By Gov4

To
Lalk

el nor

I.

A broadcast of Gov. Williams
talk on "The State Looks at Edu-
cation" will be featured at 8 p.m.
today as the highlight of WUOM's
program for the day.
The governor's address will re-
place the broadcast of the Inter-
lochen National Music Camp Or-
chestra. originally scheduled for
the 8 o'clock slot.
ED BURROWS, of the WUOM
staff, has just begun the reading
of Edward Streeter's novel "Father
of the Bride" for his 5 p.m. "Books
by Radio" show. "Books by Radio"
features the reading of a com-
plete popular novel, with the read-
er taking whatever time is needed
to finish the job.
Following is a completel isting
of WUOM programs for today.
All programs can be heard at
91.7 on the dial.

SUSTERKA LAKE
SWIMMING - FREE DANCING
Picnic Grounds -- Refreshments
Parties Accommodated
CALL DON BASTEDO - YPSI 1038-W2
Riding Horses For Hire
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NEW HORSES
Ins/ruc /ions Avrailable
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Golfside Stables
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3250 E. Huron River Dr. Ph. 7772
~- - -

of

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2:30
2:45
2:55
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:15
4:30
5:00
5:15
5:30
5:45
6:00
7:00
8:00

p.m -Tell Me, Professor.
p.m.-School of Music.
p.m.-Daily Bulletin.
p.m.-Campus Varieties.
p m.-University Sym-
phony.
p.m.-Campus News.
p.m.-The Beaver's Tale.
p.m.-Requestfully Yours.
p.m.-Books by Radio.
p m.-Adventures in Re-
search.
p.m.-Children's Ctory.
p.m.-Guest Star.
p.m.-Dinner Music.
p.m.-Classical Concert.
p m.-Gov. Williams' Talk.

at 1:40 - 4:50

- 8 00

Doors Open 1:15 P.
NOW & THURS.
Matinee 25c Nights 35c
at 3:10 - 6:20 - 9:30
LorettaRobert
YOUNG "CUMMINGS
with WENDELL COREY

ow

Fine Imported Linen
Silk Scarfs - Jewelry
Tca -Fans
And many other unusual items from the Orient.
INDIA ART SHOP
330 Maynard Phone 2-3600
nct oc- cnc moccOO oc- o

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

It's Here . .
OPENING TONIGHT
SHE GLAS
MENAGERIE
by Tennessee Williams
N.Y. Drama Critics Circle Award Play
Wednesday thru Saturday
8:00 P.M.
Admissions: $1.20, 90c, 60c (tax incl.)
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater

(Continued from Page 2)
Johnson, conductor, Tues., Jan. 17;
Myra Hess, pianist, Fri., Feb. 17;
Pittsburgh Orch., Paul Paray,
Miniature's on
Display at
Museum Here
Thirty-five Arabic and Persian
miniatures will be on display in
the North Gallery of the Univer-
sity Museum of Art from today
through Wednesday, Aug. 3, it is
announced by Prof. Jean Paul
Slusser, director of the museum.
The collection, which belongs
to Mrs. Charles C. Webber of Min-
neapolis, Minn., is one of the best
and most extensive ones in the
country since it includes very fine
examples of most of the schools.
* * *
"IT IS THEREFORE, exception-
ally well fitted to give a general
idea about the development of this
charming branch of painting,"
Professor Slusser said.
"One can follow the develop-
ments of the art from the first
delicately drawn plant forms
and flowers which illustrate
books on drugs and medicines
which were made for the use of
doctors and druggists in the 12th
and 13th centuries," he pointed
out.
The collection also contains ex-
amples from the earliest known
manuscripts of the great Persian
epic, "The Book of Kings." These,
in an impressive but still simple
fashion show the war and hunt-
ing expeditions of tre early Persian
heroes.

guest conductor, Thurs., Feb. 23;
Zino Francescatti, violinist, Mon.,
Mar. 20.
Extra Concert Series (5 con-
certs): Nelson Eddy, baritone,
Sun., Oct. 9; Boston Symphony
Orch., Charles ,Munch, conductor,
Tues., Oct. 25; Tossy Spivakovsky,
violinist, Tues., Nov. 22; Carroll
Glenn, violinist and Eugene List,
pianist, Fri., Jan. 6; Chicago Sym-
phony Orch., Fritz Reiner, guest
conductor, Sun., Mar. 12.
Orders for season tickets now
being accepted and filed in se-
quence Orders will be filled in the
same order and mailed Sept. 20.
Address: Charles A. Sink, Pres-
ident, University Musical Society,
Burton Memorial Tower.
Student Recital: Howard Street,
a student of voice with Philip
Duey, will present a program at
8:00 p.m., Wednesday, July 13, in
the Rackham Assembly Hall, in
partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the Master of Music
degree. His program will include
compositions by Handel, Schubert,
Brahms, Gretchaninoff, Rachman-
inoff, M o u s s o r g s k y, Balakiref f,
Parker, Holst, and MacGimsey.
Exhibitions
Rackham Galleries: Paintings
by Willard MacGregor, Visiting
Professor of Piano, School of Mu-
sic (July 8-August 5), East Gal-
lery.
Education Conference Textbook
Exhibit: Corridors of University
High School and University Ele-
mentary School buildings.
Events Today
Open House at German Lan-
guage Residence-Deutsches Haus

-1101 Church St., Wed., July 13,
7:30 to 10 p.m. All German-speak-
ing faculty and students are cor-.
dially invited. Refreshments.
The Square Dancing Class spon-
sored by the Graduate Outing Club
will be held Wed., July 13, at 8:00
p.m. in the Women's Athletic
Bldg There is a small admission
fee. Everyone is welcome.
Phi Delta Kappa-Tre fourth
in a series of informal dinner and
discussion meetings will be held
Wednesday, July 13, 6:00-7:30
p.m., in the University Club Din-
ing Room, Michigan Union. Dr.
William T. Blatz, professor of
Child Psychology and director of
the Institute of Child Study at the
University of Toronto, will be the
guest speaker. Members of the fac-
ulty and Phi Delta Kappans are
invited to bring a guest. Obtain
your dinner in the cafeteria line
and proceed to the Club dining
room.
"The Glass Menagerie" by Ten-
nessee Williams will open tonight
at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
This first Broadway success of
Mr. Williams' was given the New
York Drama Critics Circle Award
for the best play during the 1944-
45 season. Curtain time is 8 o'clock
Tickets are on sale at the Theatre
box office from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
through Saturday.
Coming Events
The Cerele Francais cordially in-
vites you to its next meeting,
Thurs., July 14, at 8 p.m. in the
Hussey Rm., Michigan League.
Dr. Marius Barbeau, disin-
guished Canadian folklorist, will
talk on "Les Arts traditionnels au
Canada." Miss Cohleen Jensen will

Bloomer To Talk
Prof. Harlan H. Bloomer, direc-
tor of the Speech Clinic, will speak
on "Palatal Function in Voice Pro-
duction" at 3 p.m. today in Rack'
ham Amphitheatre.
The lecture, the third in a series
of speech assemblies presented by
the speech department, will be ac-
companied by 16 mm sound films.
sing selections by Ravel and Pou-
lenc
Fun For All! A benefit Ice Cream
Carnival is being sponsored by the
Congregational-Disciples and E &
R Guild Friday and Saturday, July
15 and 16 on the Lawn of the
Congregational Church, State and
William Street. Proceeds go to-
ward bringing a displaced person
to our campus. Square dancing for
young and old. Come join the fun
and help our DP.
Wesleyan Guild-4:00 p.m. to-
day-Tea in the Wesley Lounge
of the First Methodist Church for
all Methodist students and their
friends.
Sociedad Hispanica: Professor
Ruth Kennedy will speak on "El
Madrid de 1617 a 1625"; Wed.,
July 13, 8 p.m., East Conference
Rm. of the Rackham Bldg. The
public is cordially invited.
University Community Center,
1045 Midway Place, Willow Run
Village, Mich : Wed., July 18, 8
p.m. Interdenominational Choir.
Cosing for Summer
30 to 40% discount '
on all our
FINE
RUGS
Large assortment -- scat-
ters, runners, mats - in
all sizes .Several 8x11,
9x12 consigned rugs will
be sold very reasonably ,
before shipping back
N. L. MANGOUNI
334 S. 4th Ave
Ph. 6878

1 '-
"'I bet yiou'd stay I civI if I had a hiri-do fr omu the
STAEB R BAUT Y SIIOP too!"
STAEBLER BEAUTY SHOP
601 E. Liberty Phone 8878

J acokson>L

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