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July 03, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

01-1

ST RATEGIC SITUATION:
Pastor Tells of Guidance Importance
P a t r T lsBy NANCY BYLAN
The most "strategic place" of
work for a religious counselor is
wth students, according to the
Reverend William H. Henderson,
assistant minister of the First
Presbyterian Church and advisor
to Westminster Guild. Y
Mr. Henderson finds the job of
counseling 2,200 Presbyterian stu-
dents a most important and enjoy-
able one. College students are at
the "apron-string-cutting" time of:
life, when spiritual guidance and
advice in the right direction are
especially needed, he explained.-
BORN IN PITTSBURGH, Mr. --
Henderson studied electrical engi-
neering at Carnegie Tech, but
later turned to philosophy, psy-n
chology, speech, and religion aty
the College of Wooster, Ohio.

AP LOOKS AhIE AD:
Showdown A pproaches
On British Pound Value;

Dormitory News

BEAT THE HEAT:
Student Religious Groups,
Plan Outdoor Activities

After three years of graduate
work at Yale Divinity School,
Mr. Henderson took special
courses in counseling and group
work in several different col-
leges.
He came to Ann Arbor in Au-
gust, 1948, after spending some
time at the University of West
Virginia. During the war he served
as a USO director in Tennessee,
Florida, and at Fort Bragg, N.C.
** *
MR. HENDERSON has also
counseled freshmen at Virginia
Polytechnic Institute and worked
three years with a Community
Church in Oregon.
A man of diverse interests, Mr.
Henderson especially enjoys
camping and fishing. He also
expressed a fondness for music,
particularly light opera. An ac-
tive glee club member in hisi

By The Associated Press
An eventual showdown on de-
valuation of the British pound
sterling is certain.
The British are reluctant to tam-
per with the foreign exchange
value of their money, but pressure
comes from European countries
whose own currencies are out of
line with real values.
*~ * *
PRESSURE also comes from the
United States Treasury, the U.S.
Economic Cooperation Administra-
tion and the International Mone-
tary Fund, all pressing for a gen-
eral realignment of foreign cur-
rencies.
The big question is: When will
Britain devalue the pound, or
when will its economic crisis
pass?
Most authorities guess there will
be no devaluation this summer. It
may not even come this year. If
Britain weathers her present busi-
ness troubles-even temporarily-
devaluation can be put off.
THE THING to keep in mind is
this: the value of money rests on
the attitude of people toward it.
Devaluation requires the most
careful stage setting of any mone-
tary maneuver. People must be
conditioned to accept it. Usually
all the background is thoroughly
explained as a prelude, then over-
night - without warning - comes
the decision.
Butter Barometer
WASHINGTON-Instead of pay-
rolk,, employment and industrial
production, some farm experts use
butter as an economic barometer.
Butter often is called a "depres-
sion product." Production tends to
be highest in hard times and low-
est in good times. In hard times
people drink less milk and more is
diverted into butter.
For what it may be worth, but-
ter production is running nearly

20 percent greater than a year
ago.
Spins
WASHINGTON - Now that the
Civil Aeronautics Board has elim-
inated the requirement that stu-
dent pilots be trained ine recovery
from spins, private flying interests
are urging steps to reduce the spin
possibilities in tens of thousands
of light airplanes.
AFGroups
WASHINGTON-The Air Force
is down to 54 groups of planes
from its peak of 69 a few months
ago, but may not shrink further
despite the earlier plan to cut to
48.
Manpower is now under the 420,-
000 authorized by the Budget Bu-
reau last March. Some Air Force
planners think it may be possiblej
to keep the present number of air
groups by spreading personnel a
little thinner.
Public Relations
WASHINGTON-Inside word at
the Pentagon is that the Army, Air
Force and Navy may get back con-
trol of their public relations, now
centered in the National Military
Establishment.
The present unified setup is be-
ing criticized both in and out of
the services. Another angle is that
Secretary Johnson must justify the
cost of the entire staff of more
than 300 in his budget.
Out of Print
PARIS-Bookworms in search of
out-of-print magazines are going
to get a helping hand from the
United Nations.
The UN Educational, Scientific
and Cultural Organization (UNES-
CO) has organized a "clearing
house for periodical reproduction."
When it gets 100 calls for a certain
number it will reproduce it by pho-
to-lithograph.

CHRISTOFFEL BEAMS-Harold R. Christoffel smiles as he
reads that the U.S. Supreme Court threw out charges that he
had perjured himself when he claimed before the House Labor
Committee that he was not a Communist and had no Communist
connections.

college days, he likes to sing
himself.
As advisor to Westminster Guild,
Mr. Henderson supervises all so-
cial, educational and religious
functions of the group. His favor-
ite guild activity is the Sunday

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!
TEMPLE CAFETERIA

morning Bible seminar which he
leads.
PRESBYTERIAN student activ-
ities have a long history on cam-
pus. The, first university pastor
was a Presbyterian. In 1887 Tap-
pan Association was formed, which
in more recent years was replaced
by the present Westminster Guild.
Mr. Henderson's emphasis on
student work is very much in ac-
cord with the present program of
the Presbyterian Church, which is
beginning a five year period of
concentration on working with
students.

(FDITOP'S NOTE: Contributors to
XN -tF. Up ;n the norms should con-
tact Miartha Ba-zar at The Daily or
401\ Nsw Dorm.)
The women of the New Resi-
dence Hall are looking forward
to a bright summer.
The first event will be an open
house from 2 to 4:30 p.m. on
Sunday, July 10, with refresh-
ments served in the main lounge.
- * *
A "GET ACQUAINTED" pajama
party with punch and cookies, is
planned for Wednesday evening
by the girls of Unit 4.
At elections held the first week
of the semester, Debbie Dubinsky
was chosen president and Nancy
Bylan social chairman.
Unit 2 will present a pro-
gram of movies, featuring the
latest March of Time and other
short subjects at 9 p.m. Tues-
day in the lounge.
The group's newly elected
president and social chairman
are Dolores Whitlatch and Mar-
garet Sarmast, respectively.
Betsy Barbour president Kay
Hood has announced an informal
tea (iced please) to be held on
June 6. Another session over the
teacups, this time with faculty
members is scheduled for July 13.
On July 27 students receiving
their degrees this summer will be
honored at an after dinner coffee
hour.
VICTOR VAUGHAN (formerly
Vickie) seems to change its name
more often than a Hollywood ac-
tress. This summer it is "English
House," and will house approxi-
mately one hundred students, en-
rolled in the University's English
Language Institute.
Helpful Husbands
MALACKY, Czechoslovakia -
Two members of the toad family
are called midwife, because the
male helps bear the young, accord-
ing to obstetrician experts.
The male toad carries the eggs
around on his back like a bunch
of grapes.
by Rev. Burt on "Discipline on the
Christian Life." 5 p.m., Picnic and
swimming. Transportation provid-
ed from Canterbury House at 218
N. Division Street.
Congregational-Disciples Guild
will meet at the Congregational
Church at 6:30 p.m. Dr. Alma
Cook of the University Health
Service will speak on "Recent News
from China." Dr. Cook has served
as supervisor of hospitals in North
China for the AmericanBoard of
oreign Missions since 1920.
Wesleyan Guild: Methodist stu-
dents will meet at the Wesley
Foundation at 5 p.m. today to go
to Silver Lake for a picnic and
swimming party.

Hot weather is persuading many
of the student religious groups to
fold their activities outdoors.
The Lutheran Student Associa-
tion will enjoy an outing and pic-
nic today with outdoor devotional
services.
Gamma Delta's program for to-
day will take students on a lake
outing and picnic supper.
* * *
ALSO PICNICING is Wesleyan
Guild, which will hold a swimming
party today at Silver Lake.
An early morning breakfast hike
and a Saturday watermelon hike
constitute the outdoor program of
the Congregational-Disciples Guild
for the week.
The group has also planned
several "indoor" activities. To-
night Alma Cook, missionary
from China, will speak at the
supper program.
Wednesday night a student
group will discuss "Prayer-the
Mightiest Force in the World," by
Frank Laubach. The book will be
reviewed by Sis Gibbons, secretary
in the office of the Director of
the Summer Session.
THE REVERENT H. L. Pickerill
will lead the regular Thursday
night discussion of "The Ancient
Faith in a Modern World."
Westminster Guild will offer

I ,

Wesminte- Guld il ofe

I, .

MASONIC TEMPLE
Now

the second in its series of lec-
tures concerning "Christianity
and Present World Issues."
Tonight Prof. Preston W. Slos-
son of the history department will
talk on "Religion as a Uniting
and Dividing Force." The lecture
will be followed by a buffet
supper.
* * *
MEMBERS OF Roger Williams
Guild will hear the Reverend C.
H. Loucks speak tonight at the
supper-discussion. Mr. Loucks will
show color slides of his trip to
San Francisco, where he attended
the Northern Baptist Convention,
Lecture Series
The University's summer session
lecture series of public affairs will
continue Tuesday night as Prof.
Paul B. Sears of Oberlin College
speaks on "Man and Nature in the
Modern World," at 8 p.m. in the
Rackham Lecture Hall.
This week's general topic is
"Food, Forests and People."
Waterproof, Too?
Marquette, Mich.-A new glass
fibre insulation is flreproof, rot-
proof and verminproof, according
to a local construction firm.

9 327 S. Fourth Ave.

Under

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

11:

NEW MANAGEMENT
Serving
SUNDAY DINNERS

30 A.M. to 3:30 P.M.

(Reg. Weekday Prices)

(Continued from Page 3)
Museum of Archaeology. Anti-
quities of the Mediterranean area.
Clements Library. Unique Ca-
nadiana: A Selection of Fifteen
Canadian Rarities in the Clem-
ents Library. (June 20-August 19).
General Library, main lobby
cases. Contributions of the An-
cient Mediterranean World to
Western Culture.
Michigan Historical Collections,
156 Rackham Building. Sketches

WEEKDAYS (MON. thru FRI.)

11 to 2, 5 to 7:30 P.M.

Closed Sat. All Day

A PLEASANT PLACE TO DINE

U

N OW"-when ou want them mod!
those natioally-y-ainous $25 sunniaer saits
reduced to on4 $1800

and architectural plans of Irving
K. Pond.
Coming Events
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
will hold open house Sunday night,
7:30-10:30.
Botanical Seminar-Wednesday
evening, July 6, at 7:30 p.m., in
room 1139 Natural Science Build-
ing. Professor F. K. Sparrow will
present a seminar report on Bio-
logical Observations on Water
Fungi. Professor Sparrow has
studied these fungi for many
years. Everyone interested is in-
vited.
La Sociedad Hispanica: Conver-
sation group meets Tuesday at the
Spanish House, 1219 Washtenaw
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Faculty and
students are cordially invited.
La Sociedad Hispanica cordial-
ly invites students and faculty to
an informal talk by Mr. Emiliano
Gallo-Ruiz on "El arte de Picas-
so," East Conference room of the
Rackham Building, Wednesday,
July 6, at 8 p.m.
The weekly Square Dancing
Class sponsored by the Graduate
Outing Club will be held on Thurs-
day, July 7, instead of Wednes-
day this week, at 8:00 p.m. in the
Women's Athletic Building.
University of Michigan Hostel
Club. Meeting Tuesday, July 5,
at 7:00 p.m. in Lane Hall. All
who were at our first meeting and
anyone else interested in outdoor
activities please come. Square
dancing after meeting for those
who wish.
Life With Father, the hilarious
comedy by Howard Lindsay and

Russel Crouse, will open this Wed-
nesday at 8 o'clock and run
through Saturday night. This
play, which holds the record of
the world's longest run, will be
the second in the current series
of plays presented by the Depart-
ment of Speech. Tickets can be
purchased at the Mendelssohn
Theater box office, open from 10
to 5 daily (except Sundays and
July 4th).
Chur ches
Evangelical and Reformed Stu-
dent Guild will meet with the Con-
gregational-Disciples group at the
Congregational Church, 6:30 p.m.,
for supper and program.
First Congregational Church.
Worship at 10:45 a.m. Dr. Parr
will speak on "Prove All Things."
At 6:30, Student supper; Dr. Alma
Cook, recently from China, will
speak on "Recent News from
China."
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation-
-Open house this evening, 7:30 to
10:30, at the Foundation, 1201 Hill
St.
Lutheran Student Association-
9:10 a.m., Sunday Morning Bible
Hour at the Student Center, 1304
Hill Street. Outdoor meeting and
picnic supper-meet promptly at
4:30 p.m. at Center. Choir Re-
hearsal-3:30 p.m. at Center.
Canterbury Club: Discussion led
HAIR STYLING
FOR WOMEN..
Hair cutting and styling is ex-
pertly done by 5 barbers of our
staff who have had years of
experience in Ladies Hair cut-
ting. We invite your approval.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State Theater

RHYTHM.SLIPS
Beautifully tailored,
perfect fitting Burmil Crepe
ALL WHITE . . . Sizes 32 to 38
74 VAN BUREN &
8 NICKELS ARCADE

J acOkAOfli

iii:

i

of

Ssssh!

We can't mention the name

these summer suits - can't even show
the fomous labor or tag. But you will
recognize it because you know . . .4
ti It's impeccably tailored!
t*' It fits beautifully!
x' It's cool ... and lightweight!
W' It's easy to keep clean!
t~ It resists wrinkles!
1/ It's featured in every fashion magazine!
io It's a remarkable value at any price!
: Better hurry in while there is t
still some selection available!
* Remember there's still a full
hot summer ahead... /

1 r
;3 }
47yy

MIDSUMMER
Clearance
beginning Tuesday at 9:30 A.M.
Early Summer Fashions
Substantially Reduced -
in time for Vacation Outfitting
Perfect traveling companions for now
and well into Fall!

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WHY SLAVE
on hot wash days?

SUMMER TOPPERS
Orig. $22.95..........$16
LONG AND SHORT COATS
Orig. $49.95 ..........$24
Orig. $39.95-$59.95 ....$18

SPORTSWEAR
BLOUSES

Orig.
Orig.
Orig.
Orig.

$4.95
$4.95
$5.95
$7.95

........now$2
.........now $3
.......now $4
.........now $5

t -
,', ; "d
; , '
', .
''

Do your entire laundry in
half an hour at our store.
Wash, rinse and damp-dry
clothes automatically in Wes-
tinghouse Laundromat auto-
matic washers.
Dryers available
to dry clothes

Kool Brooke SUMMER SUITS
Orig. $25.00 ............$16
DRESSES
Crepes - Cottons - Shantungs

BUTCHER LINEN
BOLERO SUITS
Orig. $8.95... ..... now $6
SUMMER SUITS
Precision Tailored Crease Resistant Suits
Orig. $17.95-$25... ... .$14
SHOES
Jacobson Debs Toni Drakes

completely

III Orig. $16.95-$19.95.now $11

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