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July 02, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE VOUlt
,OB EASIER:
Drama Reviewers Pray
For Good Play Seasons

CA"!''iTirnriAV' rr-r r n yn w

THE MICHIGAN TIAIT Y ;

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By PHOEBE FELDMAN
(Special to The Daily)
NEW YORK-Most drama crit-
ics hope for a season full of good
plays.
At least that was the opinion
Louis Kronenberger, "Time" and
"Town and Country" critic, voiced
in a recent interview.
"It makes the job easier," he
commented. "After all, when you
say a play is bad, all you can say
Positions Open
To Graduates,
Professionals
Positions ranging from teachers
to Navy officers have been an-
nounced, available on examination
to University graduates and pro-
fessional personnel, according to
three job sources.
Interviews for positions teach-
ing American children in occu-
pied Germany and Japan will be
held next week in the Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational
Information.
TEACHERS of mathematics and
science, combined mathematics-
boy's physical education, boys'
physical education alone, French,
Spanish and music are needed in
Japan and elementary teachers in
Germany.
Age limit is 22 to 40, with spe-
cial exception for men up to 45.
Families may not accompany
teachers to Japan.
THE U.S. CIVIL SERVICE Com-
mission has announced an exam-
ination for Medical Bacteriologist
for filling positions in various Fed-
eral agencies throughout the coun-
try.
Salaries range from $3,727 to
$5,232 a year.
The general requirements for
applicants is a 4-year college
course with major study in bac-
teriology or a bacteriological
science and appropriate profes-
sional experience.
Age limits of 18 to 62 will be
wailed for veterans. Applications
may be received in the Commis-
sion's Washington office not later
than August 16, 1949.
* * *
THE REGULAR NAVY is now
accepting applications for com-
missions in the Medical Service
Corps.
Applicants holding a minor
degree in Optometry, Pharmacy,
or sience allied to medicine
will be commissioned as ensigns
and those holding a DSc or PhD
in the above fields will be com-
missioned Lieutenants (j.g.)
Candidates must be between the
ages of 21 and 32 (30 for women).
Further information may be ob-
tained-from ;the Office of Naval
Officer Procurement, Rm. 949
Book- Building, Detroit.

is that it's bad-and then you be-
gin to sound like Gertrude Stein.
It gets to be a bit repetitious."
* * *
REMARKING THAT "being a
drama critic is more than just
playgoing," he noted that a critic
can't just sit back, relax, and en-
joy the play.
"You're always worrying about
what you're going to say in your
review," he noted. "While you're
watching the play, you're not
only trying to get an overall im-
pression and a good analytical
breakdown in one sitting-you're
trying to write your review. That's
not relaxing."
"But it's definitely a 'good job',"
Kronenberger stated, "although
getting paid almost detracts from
the position. After all, if you're
getting paid, you're working-and
which one of us enjoys work?"
Asked about the best back-
ground for the position, Kronen-
berger advised a good knowledge
of the methods of play production.
* * * -
"YOU WON'T be able to get into
rehearsals once you start working
as a critic. Producers don't allow
critics into rehearsals. They're
afraid it will prejudice your final,
judgment and don't want you to
see anything but the presumably
polished product."
How to get a job as a drama
critic? "Try to get hired on any
newspaper in their drama depart-
ment. Or you might try to talk
some publication that doesn't have
a drama critic into starting, a de-
partment-with you as their first
critic," Kronenberger smiled.
I'i

VICTIM OF NEAR-RACE RIOT-A girl, identified as Joan Sex-
ton, lies on the ground after an unidentified policeman on horse-
back raced, over her as he was summoned to halt a threatened
race riot at the Anacostia Park swimming pool in Washington,
D.C. The scuffle started after some 70 Negro youths showed
up at the pool. The girl pictured and two other persons were
injured, and three men were arrested. This was the second race
. trouble in several days, the other incident occurring in a Southern
city.
OPEN AIR:
Recreation Facilities Open
In Ann Arbor for Students

Kapur Sees
Peace Hope
In Gandhi
By ARLYNN ROSEN
"Grandhi has given us the out-
look, method, and weapon which
we must use if we are to escape
war."
That is the opinion of R. K.
Kapur, educational attache of the
Indian Embassy in Washington,
D.C.
"TRUTH AND non - violence
were Gandhi's main principles,
and are the ones most needed in
the world today," Kapur said yes-
terday.
Kapur explained that these
ideas are not new to India, but
have re-emerged through Gand-
hi.
"The keynote of Indian culture
is synthesis. Through the min-
gling of many races and religions,
the Indians have learned to be
supremely toleranteofrdifferent
points of view."
* * *
"BECAUSE OF INDIANS' great
love of truth, they realize that no
one knows real truth, and each
person must therefore tolerate the
next one's opinion. If a person
believes that he does know real
truth, Gandhi said that the only
means of proof is through demon-
station."
"To Gandhi, his fasts were
not pressure on others to achieve
his ends. Instead, they were a
means of self-purification to
find the cause of a bad turn of
events."
Kapur said that Gandhi's means
to an objective was through "non-
cooperation," but that if there was
ever any doubt about Gandhi's
honesty he would not accept the
fruits of success.
"Gandhi was essentially a man
of God who spiritualized politics,"
Kapur added.
"He is not merely the man of
today, but the man of tomorrow."
Win Awards
George B. Berridge, '49, has
been awarded the Sims Senior
Honor Scholarship in Economics.
Bernard L. Goodman, '50, won
the Harold D. Osterweil Prize in
Economics, which is for juniors.
They carry prizes of $500 and
$50 respectively.
Second Best
INDEPENDENCE, Mo.-Roman
candles, firecrackers, and pin-
wheels on the Fourth of July are
important than eyes, teeth, and
fingers, according to local sur-
geons.

I

ASSOCIATED PRESS
P DCUTURE NEWS

UNE - LQ E SI GN S CR O S S -T H E L I N E - U. S. and Bermuda International One-
Designs start the first of their series of seven races for the Amorita Cup in Bermuda's Great Soundi

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

L '
(Continued from Page 2) 7
Music degree. His program will
include compositions by Mozart,
Beethoven, Herbert Elwell, and
Chopin, and will be open to the
general public.
Carillon Recital: Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, will pre-
sent a recital on Sunday, July 3
at 2:15 p.m. His program will in-
clude selections by Phile, Stephen
Foster, 5 American compositions
for carillon and a group of spiri-
tuals.
Coning Events
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
will hold open house Sunday night,
7:30-10:30.
Square Dance, sponsored by U.
of Mich. Hostel Club. To be held
Saturday evening, July 2, from
8 p.m. to 11 p.m. at Women's
Athletic Building.

By DON SIGMAN
Softball diamonds, tennis courts
and picnic areas are just a few of
the many recreational facilities
offered to students by Ann Arbor's
Park Department.
Closest to campus is Burns Park
on Wells Street off Lincoln.
Burns Park offers four tennis
courts, a picnic area with tables,
many horseshoe pits, two softball
diamonds and archery. The book-
weary student will find many op-
portunities for relaxation.
* * *
HORSESHOE pitching addicts
may also throw their arms out at
night on the eight lighted pits at
Wines Field, corner Hill and Divi-
sion Streets. A lighted softball
diamond is also available for night
use.
For those who would rather
"just take it easy," picturesque
Island Park and The Glen pro-
vide many acres of grass and
trees alongside the Huron River.
Under the jurisdiction of the
City Park Department is the .18-
hole Municipal Golf Course.
* * *
The MUNICIPAL COURSE is
easier than the "U" course and is
usually less crowded, offering be-
ginners their chance to "flub" as
often as they please without hav-
ing the party behind them breath-
ing down their necks.
Opportunities other than those

offered by the city include Whit-
more Lake within an easy driv-
ing or hitch-hiking distance of
Ann Arbor. Two public beaches
on the lake provide lockers,
water slides and docks for fees
up to 50 cents.
Those with an urge to "get up
and go" might try a bike ride
through the Arboretum, over to
the Island, and through the golf
course on Fuller Street. A trip
such as this offers a real chance
to see the country about Ann
Arbor.
* * *
AND OVER, the weekend of the
fourth, with nobody in town,
there's always a little jaunt to
Detroit or a slightly longer trip
to one of the larger lakes on either
side of Michigan.
If there's absolutely nothing to
do, and nobody to do it with,
there's always solitaire.
Sun get you down? Try an air-
conditioned movie.

G I A N T S K E ET I K .- Lorain Farmer examines a two-foot-long model of a mosquito at the,
Chicago Natuftal history Museum. James E. Trott, artist of Museum staff, took 2 years to complete it.'

Classified Advertising ]

I.t

WANTED TO BUY
GOOD, USED studio couch. Ph. 2-6629.
)48
ROOM AND BOARD
TASTY HOME-COOKED MEALS-Sani-
tary approved AA Health Dept. Mrs.
Peachers, 1009 E. Catherine St. Call
2-3782. 2 meals daily 12:15 p.m., 6:15
p.m. Sunday 1:00 p.m. )37
BUSINESS
SERVICES
THE COST OF KEEPING fully inform-
ed today will be minimized if you
subscribe to TIME at the special Stu-
dent Rate-only $5.00 yr. Less than
two hours reading and a dime will
be the weekly cost to you. Order now
by phoning 6007. Student Periodical
Agency. )46
WILL MOW your lawn..Call Yang.
2-3219 between 11-12 a.m. )42
TYPEWRITING SERVICE-Student re-
ports, theses, dissertations. Phone
6197. ) 28
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2
HOT WEATHER SPECIAL - With an
easy to manage new permanent wave,
cut and styled especially for you, you
can beat the summer heat. Our regu-
lar $15 permanent waves now $10.
$12.50 now $8.50. Rainey's Beauty
Salon, 1031 E. Ann. Air-conditioned.
Ph. 2-3725. Open evenings by ap-
pointment. )32P

a,

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
Michigan League Ballroom
10:30 A.M.: Sunday Lesson Sermon.
11:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday evening Testimonial
Meeting.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
W. P. Lemon, W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Morning worship. Sermon by Dr.
Lemon, "A Dialogue with God."
10:45 A.M.: Summer Church School through Jun-
ior Department.
5:30 P.M.: Summer Vesper Service in Social
Hall. Prof. Preston W. Slosson will speak on
"Religion as a Uniting and Dividing Force."
Buffet supper follows.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Washington
Ministers: James Brett Kenna and
Erland J. Wang
Music: Lester McCoy, director
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist
-Student Activities: Doris Reed, associate
director.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's ser-
mon topic: "The Reason for Living."
5:30 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild. Wesley Lounge.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

FOR RENT

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Sunday at 10:00: Bible Study.
Sunday at 11:00: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "The Breastplate of Righteousness."
Sunday at 3:00: Meet at the Student Center for
Lake Outing and Picnic Supper.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
N. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House. Reserva-
tions 2-4097).
11:00 A.M.: Church School Summer Session
(through second grade).
11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion. Sermon by the
Reverend Henry Lewis, S.T.D.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
5:00 P.M.: Canterbury Club leaves from Canter-
bury House (218 N. Division) for a picnic
supper, fellowship hour and discussion. (Bring
swimming suits.) Reservations, 2-4097.
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast).
Wednesday, 7:30 to 10:00 P.M.: Chaplain Burt
and his wife will be "at home" to students and
their friends at 702 Tappan St.
Friday, 4:00 to 6:00 P.M.: Open House at Can-
terbury House.

SINGLE ROOM for man, linens and
towels furnished, close to campus.
Phone 2-8787. )44
SINGLE AND DOUBLE ROOM with
cooking privileges. Maple furniture.
507 East Liberty. Ph. 5224. )43
FOR
SALE
BIOLOGY TEACHERS! The micro-
scope you need. B&L 3-obj., medical,
mech. stage. New. Lowest price. 2-
4271. )47
BINOCULAR MICROSCOPE - German,
new, modern design. Full optical
equipment. Call 2-2521, Ext. 415 'til
5 p.m. After 6 2-8551. ) 38
SUMMER SPECIALS at Sam's. Men's
loafers $3.88; men's moccasins $2.48;
navyT-shlirts 49c; wash slacks $2.99.
Sam's Store, "122 E. Washington. )36
TOWN AND COUNTRY JEEP
Unique custom-built convertible. 4-
wheel drive. Highest bid takes it. Call
25-9383 after 6. )22
NEED CASH-Must sell tennis racquet,
radio that wakes you to music, pho-
tographic equipment. Call Bob 2-
8429. ) 45

S E A T E S T ' - Renato Greco, 25-year-old Italian model ship builder, tests a model of the
Italian battleship, "Armando Diaz," for seaworthiness in the bathroom of his Rome apartment.

eaOIft9

~ L

-=

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
11 A M . Service. Mr Rriman nreochinaon.

Then protect your funds
with TRAVELER'S CHECKS
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